Wednesday, November 30, 2016

artefact & apposite

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32


Germaine Greer: [olde-worlde; it drives me nuts;] Well, it's obviously possible and yes, I would. But what worries me slightly is the assumption that that Shakespeare is kind of olde-worlde and not of today and so forth. The reason we speak Shakespearean language is because it is still current for us. People say that Shakespeare is full of cliches, what they don't realise is that we've been copying his way of saying things for a very long time. It drives me nuts that people want to prove that he is the Earl of Oxford. 


Anthony Grayling: [apposite; essayist; inhabit;] Can I just comment, by the way, I've been struck by the idea that if the royalties due to Plato, Aristotle an so on could be paid into a fund. I could arrange that would be ... But I think it's a very good idea. I think in the case of this question that it's very very apposite, because Shakespeare is a wonderful resource, not alone, but I think magnificently ahead of the game in getting us to see things about despair, ambition, desire, passion for vengeance, love and all these things. One of the greatest writers about Shakespeare is William Hazlitt, the essayist, talking about the characters. Not the plays so much, their structure and the like, but his investigation of characters, he was so fascinated by the fact that somehow Shakespeare with this marvellous ability he had to be anybody and everybody, to see everything from all points of view, to inhabit these different sensibilities, brought out things about what it is to be human, which when you see a play or when you read a play today, you're very struck by. So I mean I think he remains a great relevance for that point. 

Definitions:

artefact:
an object that is made by a person, especially sth of historical or cultural interest.

apposite:
very appropriate for a particular situation or in relation to sth.

Monday, November 28, 2016

avid & aviation

Quotations:


Former airline employee could endanger lives if released on bail over hoax radio calls, court told:

-- "Given that he's an avid fan of aviation, there's a risk he may be tempted to continue making these calls," she said.

Definitions:

avid:
1. very enthusiastic about st (often a hobby);
2. wanting to get sth very much;

aviation:
the designing, building and flying of aircraft.


Sunday, November 27, 2016

feature & debutant

Quotations:


Australia v South Africa: Australia beats Proteas by seven wickets to end Test match losing streak:

-- In an age of renewal for Australia's Test side under captain Steve Smith, the result was the perfect tonic after two sorry losses in Perth and Hobart, with a team featuring three debutants showing improved spirit and application to pull one back in the series.

Definitions:

feature:
1. to have an important part in sth;
...

debutant:
a man making his first public appearance, especially in sport.








Saturday, November 26, 2016

magnate & fallout

Quotations:


Crown Casino arrests: Government notified of formal arrest of three Australian staff in China:

-- In October, billionaire casino magnate James Packer expressed "deep concern" for the detained Crown Casino employees.

-- The fallout could hurt Crown's operations in Melbourne and Perth along with James Packer's new project at Barangaroo in Sydney, which will have no poker machines and have a heavy reliance on high rollers, including ones from China.

Definitions:

magnate:
a person who is rich, powerful and successful, especially in business.


fallout:
1. the bad results of a situation or an action;
2. ..

Friday, November 25, 2016

headquarters & high roller

Quotations:


Crown Casino arrests: Government notified of formal arrest of three Australian staff in China:

-- The three Australians include the head of Crown's VIP International team, Jason O'Connor, who was visiting China from the company headquarters in Melbourne when he and others were detained in October.

-- He is responsible for attracting wealthy high rollers to Crown's casinos in Australia.

Definitions:

headquarters:
a place from which an organization or a military operation is controlled.

high roller:
a person who spends a lot of money, especially on gambling.

Thursday, November 24, 2016

crackdown & enclave

Quotations:


Crown Casino arrests: Government notified of formal arrest of three Australian staff in China:

-- The industry has been known to skirt the ban by touting destination packages rather than gambling, particularly as Chinese President Xi Jinping's ongoing corruption crackdown has deterred some gamblers from the Chinese gambling enclave of Macau.

Definitions:

crackdown:
severe action taken to restrict the activities of criminals or of people opposed to the government or sb in authority.

enclave:
an area of a country or city where the people have a different religion, culture or nationality from those who live in the country or city that surrounds it.

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

consular & tout

Quotations:


Crown Casino arrests: Government notified of formal arrest of three Australian staff in China:

-- Foreign Minister Julia Bishop confirmed the arrests in a statement to the ABC, adding the three Australians remained in detention in Shanghai and had been visited by Australian consular officials.

-- The industry has been known to skirt the ban by touting destination packages rather than gambling, particularly as Chinese President Xi Jinping's ongoing corruption crackdown has deterred some gamblers from the Chinese gambling enclave of Macau.

Definitions:

consular:
adj of consul;

consul:
a government official who is the representative of his or her country in a foreign city.

tout:
1. to try to persuade people to buy your goods or services, especially by going to them and asking them directly;
2. ...

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

the tip of the iceberg & rupture

Quotations:


ACL injuries: Growing number of child cases prompts call for national database:

-- Sports injury expert Professor Caroline Finch from Federation University said that would just be the tip of the iceberg.

--That's the ACL. This is what it looks like when you rupture it.

Definitions:

the tip of the iceberg:
a problem of difficult situation that shows that a much more serious problem exists.

rupture:
1. to burst or break apart sth inside the body; to be broken or burst apart;
...




malware & dormant

Quotations:


Computer Owners Urged to Do This Today:

-- This revolutionary new sytem from ScanGuard will detect and eliminate any Viruses, Adware and Malware which may be silently dormant on your computer ready to bombard you with advertising, slow down your computer, or even, steal your personal information like credit card data when shopping online or Internet banking.

Definitions:

malware:
software such as a virus on a computer or computer network that the user does not know about or want.

dormant:
not active or growing now but able to become active or to grow in the future.

Sunday, November 20, 2016

expressiveness & toff

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32


Germaine Greer: [olde-worlde; it drives me nuts; expressiveness; toff; artefact; ] Well, it's obviously possible and yes, I would. But what worries me slightly is the assumption that that Shakespeare is kind of olde-worlde and not of today and so forth. The reason we speak Shakespearean language is because it is still current for us. People say that Shakespeare is full of cliches, what they don't realise is that we've been copying his way of saying things for a very long time. It drives me nuts that people want to prove that he is the Earl of Oxford, because one thing that is obvious to me is that he is not the Earl of Oxford. He is someone who speaks the language of ordinary people and who has no university degrees and none of that. It's all to do with expressiveness and putting into words things that people had never managed to say. I mean, we have to understand what it is like, when the only thing you've got in the way of literary culture is the sermon in your church on a Sunday, and the play that you may hear only once a year or even once in your lifetime, and then that play - the play doesn't work unless you bring your imagination and extraordinary thing about that is that you have this big hungry imagination that pounced on these plays and turned them into what they are? They are our collective inheritance. They are not simply a literary exercise by some strange toff who existed 400 years ago. They are ours. We made them. It's our language. Our language is our most important artefact. It's a huge language and the person who put it together for us in the best way is Shakespeare.  

Definitions:

expressiveness:
expressive:
showing or able to show your thoughts and feelings.

toff:
a disapproving way of referring to sb from a high social class.

Saturday, November 19, 2016

homicide & superintendent

Quotations:


Man killed after being shot in neck at Baulkham Hills:

-- Homicide detectives and officers from the Hills Local Area Command are investigating what led to the attack on the Baulkham Hills man.

-- Hills LAC commander Superintendent Rob Critchlow said: "We don't believe it was a random attack. We do understand there was some degree of targeting and some degree involved in the crime which is subject to further investigation."

Definitions:

homicide:
the crime of killing sb deliberately.

superintendent:
1. a police officer just above the rank of chief inspector;
2. a person who has a lot of authority and manages and controls an activity, a place, a group of workers, etc.
...



Thursday, November 17, 2016

olde-worlde & it drives me nuts

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32


Germaine Greer: [olde-worlde; it drives me nuts;] Well, it's obviously possible and yes, I would. But what worries me slightly is the assumption that that Shakespeare is kind of olde-worlde and not of today and so forth. The reason we speak Shakespearean language is because it is still current for us. People say that Shakespeare is full of cliches, what they don't realise is that we've been copying his way of saying things for a very long time. It drives me nuts that people want to prove that he is the Earl of Oxford. 

Definitions:

olde-worlde:
trying deliberately to seem old-fashioned.

it drives me nuts:
to be getting annoyed by a trivial or small matter.

commission & subsidise

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32

Alana Valentine: [box office; royalty; commission;]I'm a working playwright and my question to the panel is: Could the box office royalties that Shakespeare would be entitled to as the author of his produced plays be paid into a found to commission and produce new Australian work? 

Tony Jones: [subsidise] So, Germaine, would like to see Shakespeare subsidising young Australian writers. Is that even theoretically possible? I mean, it's obviously. 


Definitions:

commission:
1. to officially ask sb to write, make or create sth or to do a task for you;
...

subsidise:
to give money to sb or an organization to help pay for sth; to give a subsidy.

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

box office & royalty

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32

Alana Valentine: [box office; royalty; commission;]I'm a working playwright and my question to the panel is: Could the box office royalties that Shakespeare would be entitled to as the author of his produced plays be paid into a found to commission and produce new Australian work? 

Definitions:

box office:
1. the place in a theatre where you buy tickets;
2. tickets sales for a theatrical or cinematic entertainment, or the income from these sales;

royalty:
1. a sum of money that is paid to sb who has written a book, piece of music, etc. each time that it is sold or performed;
...

morph & trump


Quotations:


-- ​From Brexit in the United Kingdom, to Mr Trump in the US, to Pauline Hanson's re-emergence in Australia, protectionist instincts are morphing into political movements that are shaking the foundations of liberal democracies.​

-- The message could not be clearer: protectionism in an age of economic insecurity, globalisation and terrorism trumps identity politics.

Definitions

morph:
1. to change, or make sb/sth change into sth different;
...

trump:
1. to beat sth that sb says or does by saying or doing sth even better;
2. to win or to succeed, for example in sports or business, because you have an advantage that your opponent does not have;
3. to defeat or outdo a competitor by bringing a valuable resource or advantage into play

Monday, November 14, 2016

wash-up & ascendency

Quotations:


-- Now in the wash-up of Mr Trump's ascendency that has sent shockwaves through the world, the political classes are facing up to confronting realities.

Definitions:

wash-up:
1. if someone washes up somewhere, they arrive there unexpectedly after a long time;
2. a debriefing session or follow-up discussion;
...

ascendency:
1. a position of power or domination over others;
2. the advantage, power, or influence that one person or group have over another;





Saturday, November 12, 2016

bard & perennial

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32

Anthony Grayling: [bard; perennial;] Not really. Because, of course, he is the national bard, so, you know, no problem about performances. Look the point has been well made that you wouldn't want performances of Shakespeare to exclude everything else. Obviously not. But human nature is perennial, if you went all the way back to Homer, for example, if you read in the Iliad, Homer's account of the grief of Achilles for Patroclus, if ever you've yourself experienced any kind of grief, you see with the immediacy that that is very very true and deep account of it. 

Definitions:

bard:
a person who writes poems.

perennial:
1. continuing for a very long time; happening again and again;
...

Friday, November 11, 2016

have a crack at & it's no easy feat

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32

Tony Jones: [have a crack at] Aren't you having a crack at Macbeth as well? 

Kylie Farmer: [be no easy feat] I haven't started yet. Because I haven't got the contract, but when that comes through then I'll start doing the work. But I am. Yes, so it's no easy feat. Let me tell you. But yes.


Definitions:

have a crack at sth/doing sth:
try to do sth.

it's no easy feat:
The matter at hand is not easily attained or achieved.

Thursday, November 10, 2016

gammon & sonnet

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32

Kylie Farmer: [by the name of; gammon; sonnet;] Another man by the name of Kyle. J. Morrison, who's the current artistic director of Yirra Yaakkin, has had a long held goal, I suppose, to translate, or have a full work translated into Noongar language. He had opportunity recently in 2012 through Shakespeare's Globe to do that, but unfortunately, he did not have enough time offered to him, so we ended up putting together six selected Shakespearean sonnets, which I translated into Noongar language. I know earlier they said I'm a Shakespearean translator which is a little bit gammon, but I have translated six Shakespearean sonnets, so that's how I ....

Definitions:

gammon:
1. false or meaningless talk that is intended to deceive somebody;
...

sonnet:
a poem that has 14 lines, each containing 10 syllables, and a fixed pattern of rhyme.

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

on one's feet & get/be hooked on

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32

Kate Mulvany: [casting; on my feet;] She's an English teacher. Yes, my mum told me, I grew up in country western Australia, my mum said to me: you're not going to enjoy Shakespeare. We could either do literature, Shakespeare, or we could do Australian literature. And she said to me: do the Australian literature. So I actually studied John Romeril, Debera Oswald, Dorothy Hewett, Germaine Greer. I studied amazing, amazing Australian writers and thinkers and that was what encouraged me to become a playwright. It wasn't till I was at university and got a casting in Hamlet --  as Claudius, of all things --  that I kind of had to put my hand up and say, I've never studied it before and I learnt on my feet. And I think, I'm still learning on my feet. I do a lot of Shakespeare and I adore it, but I'm still catching up. So, I have a foot in both kind of fields, I guess, I love my Shakespeare, but first and foremost I'm an Australian writer.

Tony Jones: [get hooked on] Kylie, let's bring you in. How did you get hooked on the work of a white man from Britain who's been dead for more than 400 years?

Definitions:

on one's feet:
1. In an impromptu situation; extemporaneously;
...

get/be hooked on:
to be addicted to or to really like something.

EastEnders & casting

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32


Germaine Greer: [recast; carry out; nonsensical; end up; Mafioso;alleyway; tax; call sth into question; dramatise; EastEnders] And 400 years is not very long. It's a blink in the history of the world. And what actually happens in a Shakespeare play is you are prevented from arriving at easy certainties. Every thing you think you understand is challenged. So, you have to recast your own ideas. People start off thinking, for example, about Hamlet, that Hamlet's duty is to carry out revenge on a death of his father. That's a nonsensical idea. We have justice in order to keep us free from revenge which will end us up in a kind of Mafioso situation with blood in every alleyway. It's altogether more taxing and intelligent and questing, Shakespeare isn't a representative of the ruling class. He exists to call into question all our certainties, and this is what makes them, the plays, work, because everything keeps shifting. It's not a question of dramatising a narrative that when you've got hold the narrative, you've understood the story. He is not writing scripts for EastEnders or neighbours. He is actually making you think. The only thing he wants you to do is to think. He doesn't tell you what to think; he tells you that you must think.


Kate Mulvany: [casting; on my feet;] She's an English teacher. Yes, my mum told me, I grew up in country western Australia, my mum said to me: you're not going to enjoy Shakespeare. We could either do literature, Shakespeare, or we could do Australian literature. And she said to me: do the Australian literature. So I actually studied John Romeril, Debera Oswald, Dorothy Hewett, Germaine Greer. I studied amazing, amazing Australian writers and thinkers and that was what encouraged me to become a playwright. It wasn't till I was at university and got a casting in Hamlet --  as Claudius, of all things --  that I kind of had to put my hand up and say, I've never studied it before and I learnt on my feet. And I think, I'm still learning on my feet. I do a lot of Shakespeare and I adore it, but I'm still catching up. So, I have a foot in both kind of fields, I guess, I love my Shakespeare, but first and foremost I'm an Australian writer.

Definitions:

EastEnders:
A British television soap opera about a group of people who live in alber square, an imaginary part of east London.

casting:
1. the process of choosing actors for a play or film/movie.
...

Tuesday, November 8, 2016

call sth into question & dramatise

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32


Germaine Greer: [recast; carry out; nonsensical; end up; Mafioso;alleyway; tax; call sth into question; dramatise; EastEnders] And 400 years is not very long. It's a blink in the history of the world. And what actually happens in a Shakespeare play is you are prevented from arriving at easy certainties. Every thing you think you understand is challenged. So, you have to recast your own ideas. People start off thinking, for example, about Hamlet, that Hamlet's duty is to carry out revenge on a death of his father. That's a nonsensical idea. We have justice in order to keep us free from revenge which will end us up in a kind of Mafioso situation with blood in every alleyway. It's altogether more taxing and intelligent and questing, Shakespeare isn't a representative of the ruling class. He exists to call into question all our certainties, and this is what makes them, the plays, work, because everything keeps shifting. It's not a question of dramatising a narrative that when you've got hold the narrative, you've understood the story. He is not writing scripts for EastEnders or neighbours. He is actually making you think. The only thing he wants you to do is to think. He doesn't tell you what to think; he tells you that you must think.

Definitions:

call sth into question:
to doubt sth or make others doubt sth;

dramatise:
1. to present a book, an event, etc. as a play or a film;
2. to make sth seem more exciting or important than it really is.

Sunday, November 6, 2016

Mafioso & tax

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32


Germaine Greer: [recast; carry out; nonsensical; end up; Mafioso;alleyway; tax; call sth into question; dramatise; EastEnders] And 400 years is not very long. It's a blink in the history of the world. And what actually happens in a Shakespeare play is you are prevented from arriving at easy certainties. Every thing you think you understand is challenged. So, you have to recast your own ideas. People start off thinking, for example, about Hamlet, that Hamlet's duty is to carry out revenge on a death of his father. That's a nonsensical idea. We have justice in order to keep us free from revenge which will end us up in a kind of Mafioso situation with blood in every alleyway. It's altogether more taxing and intelligent and questing, Shakespeare isn't a representative of the ruling class. He exists to call into question all our certainties, and this is what makes them, the plays, work, because everything keeps shifting. It's not a question of dramatising a narrative that when you've got hold the narrative, you've understood the story. He is not writing scripts for EastEnders or neighbours. He is actually making you think. The only thing he wants you to do is to think. He doesn't tell you what to think; he tells you that you must think.

Definitions:

Mafioso:
a member of the Mafia;

Mafia:
a secret organization of criminals, that is active especially in Sicily, Italy and the US.

tax:
1. to need a great amount of physical or mental effort;
...

Saturday, November 5, 2016

recast & nonsensical

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32


Germaine Greer: [recast; carry out; nonsensical; end up; Mafioso;alleyway; tax; call sth into question; dramatise; EastEnders] And 400 years is not very long. It's a blink in the history of the world. And what actually happens in a Shakespeare play is you are prevented from arriving at easy certainties. Every thing you think you understand is challenged. So, you have to recast your own ideas. People start off thinking, for example, about Hamlet, that Hamlet's duty is to carry out revenge on a death of his father. That's a nonsensical idea. We have justice in order to keep us free from revenge which will end us up in a kind of Mafioso situation with blood in every alleyway. It's altogether more taxing and intelligent and questing, Shakespeare isn't a representative of the ruling class. He exists to call into question all our certainties, and this is what makes them, the plays, work, because everything keeps shifting. It's not a question of dramatising a narrative that when you've got hold the narrative, you've understood the story. He is not writing scripts for EastEnders or neighbours. He is actually making you think. The only thing he wants you to do is to think. He doesn't tell you what to think; he tells you that you must think.

Definitions:

recast:
1. to change sth by organizing or presenting it in a different way;
2. to change actors or the role of a particular actor in a play, etc.

nonsensical:
ridiculous, with no meaning.

playwright & moratorium

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32

Tony Jones: [playwright; moratorium] Now, John, the Sydney playwright, Lachlan Philpott asks whether play about Danish or British king is relevant to contemporary Australian audiences, and he says we need a five-year moratorium, no Shakespeare on our play, on our stages for five years, what do you say to him?

Definitions:

playwright:
a person who writes plays for the theatre, television or radio.

moratorium:
a temporary stopping of an activity, especially by official agreement.

Thursday, November 3, 2016

practiced & swell

Quotations:


Naps at work, second sleeps and shared bedrooms: How culture affects sleep:

-- "The family I lived with practiced co-sleeping as well as a greater integration of sleeping and waking activity, with string beds placed outside the house so members of the family could lie down or nap on them while various activities household activities went on around them," Dr Glaskin said.

-- The next time you feel a swell of anxiety about whether you're sleeping the way you "should", take a deep breath and remind yourself there's an enormous variety of sleep patterns experienced by the 7.4 billion people across the planet.

Definitions:

practiced:
1. expert in doing something because of long experience;
2. skillful in something as a result of experience.

swell:
1. a situation in which sth increase in size, number, strength, etc.
2. ...

insomniac & the tenor of

Quotations:


Naps at work, second sleeps and shared bedrooms: How culture affects sleep:

-- With the exception of shift workers and insomniacs, sleeping in single, consolidated, eight-hour blocks is a widespread expectation for people in the West. But it hasn't always been that way.

-- "One of things that she observed was that where people slept every night within these camps varied according to a whole range of factors that were indicative of the emotional tenor of what was going on in the camp, as well as things like kinship, and ideas about keeping people safe," Dr Glaskin said.

Definitions:

insomniac:
a person who finds it difficult to sleep.

the tenor of:
the general character or meaning of sth.

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

onsen & adept

Quotations:


Naps at work, second sleeps and shared bedrooms: How culture affects sleep:

-- "If colleagues go away on a trip together, it would be normal for them to sleep on futons in the same room together and to bathe in onsen (hot spring) together, and this would all be part of fostering intimacy and closeness — a sort of bonding, which is a very different approach to sleep than we typically have in the West," she said.

-- Japanese people are adept at sleeping in public

Definitions:

onsen: 
hot spring.

adept:
adept at/in sth; adept at/in doing sth: good at doing sth that is quite difficult.