Monday, October 31, 2016

far afield & futon

Quotations:


Naps at work, second sleeps and shared bedrooms: How culture affects sleep:

-- You don't have to look too far afield to see there are some wildly different ideas of what's appropriate in the land of nod.

-- "If colleagues go away on a trip together, it would be normal for them to sleep on futons in the same room together and to bathe in onsen (hot spring) together, and this would all be part of fostering intimacy and closeness — a sort of bonding, which is a very different approach to sleep than we typically have in the West," she said.

Definitions:

far/farther/further afield:
far away from home; to or in places that are not near.

afield:
distant from home.

futon:
a Japanese mattress, often on a wooden frame, that can be used for sitting on or rolled out to make a bed.

Sunday, October 30, 2016

intractable & resurgence

Quotations:


Naps at work, second sleeps and shared bedrooms: How culture affects sleep:

-- And what about your habit of spending two hours awake in the middle of each night? A red flag for an intractable problem, or merely a resurgence of a sleep pattern that was once considered entirely normal?

Definitions:

intractable:
very difficult to deal with.

resurgence:
the return and growth of an activity that has stopped.

Saturday, October 29, 2016

interplay & lightning rod

Quotations:


Six striking facts about lightning:

-- There's nothing like a dramatic interplay of lightning and thunder for atmosphere and fear, but is it really true that lighting never strikes twice? And what does lightning have to do with volcanoes?

-- ​ABC weatherman Graham Creed agrees. "These days lightning rods get hit multiple times and other things such as large trees or overly metallic rocks can become lightning attractors," he says.

Definitions:

interplay:
the way in which two or more things or people affect each other.

lightning rod:
1. a metal rod attached to the highest point of a building or other structure to protect it from lightning by conducting the lightning to the ground;
2. someone who attracts a lot of criticism, sometimes as a way of protecting someone else.

Friday, October 28, 2016

pastime & chicken out

Quotations:


Australian dollar could be poised for significant drop:

-- I'm constantly looking at financial markets commentary. I may be a little biased in saying this, but I've noticed recently that writing about every movement in the Aussie dollar, and predicting where it may move, seems to be a national pastime.

-- I'm also going to chicken out with my forecast and give you two likely scenarios, rather than one.

Definitions:

pastime:
something that you enjoy doing when you are not working.

chicken out:
to manage to get out of something, usually because of fear or cowardice.




Thursday, October 27, 2016

spike & upmarket

Quotations:


Cyanide coffee death: Jessica Wongso found guilty of Mirna Salihin's murder:

Police alleged Wongso spiked her friend's iced coffee with cyanide as they dined with another friend at an upmarket shopping mall in Jakarta in January

Definitions:

spike:
1. to add alcohol, poison or a drug to sb's drink or food without them knowing;

upmarket:
designed for or used by people who belong to a high social class or have a lot of money.



be dead in the water & a hell of a

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32

John Bell: [commission; be dead in the water; a hell of a;]Thank you. I think it's a question of balance. Any theatre culture needs a balance of classics and new work. It's just a matter of working out the proportions. Audiences need to see the classics, we, the artists need the classics, actors, directors, designers need to work on the classics to become good at them. It's all a matter of proportion. Looking around the country, I would say that all the major companies might do 7 or 8 plays a year, they might do one Shakespeare in that season, some of them do not do a Shakespeare at all that season. So, looking around the country as a whole, I'd say Shakespeare certainly isn't pushing anybody out of the way, or taking over; what I'd like to see is that the companies both commissioning new Australian work and then developing it, too often a play gets thrown on before it's ready and it's dead in the water. Plays need a lot of nurturing. And I think that's what the companies should be doing. But I don't think we're being swarmed by Shakespeare and I do question your ideas about Shakespeare producing stereotypes, I think he created extraordinarily original characters, he broke stereotypes, he challenged notions of stereotypes, and I think he can teach us a hell of a lot about the world we live in. 

Definitions:

be dead in the water:
to have no chance of success or survival.

a hell of a:
used for emphasising how good something is.

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

malfunction & tip

Quotations:


Dreamworld: Four people killed on Thunder River Rapids ride at Gold Coast theme park:

-- Two of the four victims were thrown off the ride when it malfunctioned and the other two were trapped inside.

-- Early investigations suggest water pushed one raft into another and one of the rafts tipped over, throwing the riders out.

Definitions:

malfunction:
to fail to work correctly.

tip:
1. to move so that one end or side is higher than the other;
...






Monday, October 24, 2016

irreversible & no brainer

Quotations:


Georgie Stone wins GLBTI Person of the Year: GLOBE Awards:

-- In 2013, as a result of her appeal, the rules changed so transgender children no longer need to go to court to get puberty blockers. However they are still required to apply to court for irreversible gender-affirming hormones, and that's something she's now lobbying the government to change.

-- "For my family and I it was really a no brainer. We have the opportunity to change lives and make a difference. People are listening to us so for me it wasn't really an option. I wanted to do it because I could do it.

Definitions:

irreversible:
that cannot be changed back to what it was before.

no brainer:
a question or problem that is very easy to deal with.





Sunday, October 23, 2016

quite a character & commission

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32

Tony Jones: [quite a character] I'm sure Richard would like us to have a bit of laugh, because he was quite a character. But just what's sort of legacy, do you think he left behind? 

John Bell: [commission; be dead in the water; a hell of a;]Thank you. I think it's a question of balance. Any theatre culture needs a balance of classics and new work. It's just a matter of working out the proportions. Audiences need to see the classics, we, the artists need the classics, actors, directors, designers need to work on the classics to become good at them. It's all a matter of proportion. Looking around the country, I would say that all the major companies might do 7 or 8 plays a year, they might do one Shakespeare in that season, some of them do not do a Shakespeare at all that season. So, looking around the country as a whole, I'd say Shakespeare certainly isn't pushing anybody out of the way, or taking over; what I'd like to see is that the companies both commissioning new Australian work and then developing it, too often a play gets thrown on before it's ready and it's dead in the water. Plays need a lot of nurturing. And I think that's what the companies should be doing. But I don't think we're being swarmed by Shakespeare and I do question your ideas about Shakespeare producing stereotypes, I think he created extraordinarily original characters, he broke stereotypes, he challenged notions of stereotypes, and I think he can teach us a hell of a lot about the world we live in. 

Definitions:

quite a character:
"you are quite a character" always means "you are not typical" and "you are not politically correct." This also implies you are unusual, perhaps even one-of-a-kind. (quote from: https://www.quora.com/What-does-it-mean-when-someone-calls-you-quite-a-character)

commission:
1. to ask someone such as an artist or musician to produce a piece of work in exchange for payment;
2. to officially ask for a piece of work to be done for you;
...

Saturday, October 22, 2016

repercussion & ludicrous

Quotations:


Appco: Workers launch $85m class action against marketing giant over alleged underpayment, bullying:

-- "It was embarrassing having to do them and complete them in the first place. But if you didn't the repercussions were even worse. You're made to feel like you weren't part of the group if you didn't do these things and you were made to feel like you were by yourself if you went against their decisions," Mr Yates said.

-- "Why would I want to stay in a job that pays me $1,400 after seven months work? It's just ludicrous".

Definitions:

repercussion:
an indirect and usually bad result of an action or event that may happen some time afterwards.

ludicrous:
unreasonable; that you cannot take seriously.




Friday, October 21, 2016

quartile & crunch

Quotations:


200,000 jobs at risk as housing boom rolls over, Morgan Stanley research shows:

-- "Transaction volumes and price growth have slowed, but auction clearance rates have remained high — reflecting lower volumes and their bias to top-quartile [more expensive] Sydney and Melbourne property.

-- Morgan Stanley is forecasting a credit crunch resulting in a hard landing for the new apartment construction cycle.

Definitions:

quartile:
one of four equal groups into which a set of things can be divided according to the distribution of a particular variable.

crunch:
1. an emergency or crisis, especially one caused by a shortage of money or other resources;
...





Thursday, October 20, 2016

manslaughter & hand down

Quotations:


Gable Tostee found not guilty of killing Warriena Wright on Tinder date:

-- A Supreme Court jury in Brisbane had struggled to reach a verdict, but it finally acquitted Mr Tostee of both murder and manslaughter, with the decision handed down just hours after defence lawyers called for a mistrial.

Definitions:

manslaughter:
the crime of killing sb illegally but not deliberately.

hand down:
1. to decide on a verdict or sentence and announce it in court;
2. ...


chide & staffer

Quotations:


Tony Abbott says 'no deal' negotiated with David Leyonhjelm over Adler ban:

-- But the former prime minister told the ABC he was "chiding" the Senator Leyonhjelm, not Mr Turnbull.

-- "A staffer in a Minister's office [sent the email], no deals from me," he said.

Definitions:

chide:
to criticize or blame sb because they have done sth wrong.

staffer:
a member of staff in a big organization.


Monday, October 17, 2016

outgun & erstwhile

Quotations:


Islamic State: Iraq launches operation to capture Mosul from terrorists:

-- The extremists are vastly outnumbered by as much as 10 to one. They are also fantastically outgunned, faced by an Iraqi military re-armed by the Americans, retrained by a coalition including Australia, and backed by formidable, and precise, air power.

-- There's even been a report (unconfirmed so far) that an extremist organisation of ex-Baathists, who cooperated with IS, has called for an uprising against their erstwhile allies.

Definitions:

outgun:
to have greater military strength than sb.

erstwhile:
former; that until recently was the type of person or thing described but is not any more;



coroner & cordon

Quotations:


Four people found dead in home in Davidson, in Sydney's north:

-- Detectives are now investigating and a report will be prepared for the coroner.

-- A section of the leafy suburban road has been cordoned off restricting access to the house.

Definitions:

coroner:
an official whose job is to discover the cause of any sudden, violent or suspicious death by holding an inquest.

cordon:
a line or ring of police officers, soldiers, etc. guarding sth or stopping people from entering or leaving a place.

cordon off:
to surround an area with a line of police officers, soldiers, or their vehicles, to control access to it.




Sunday, October 16, 2016

seizure & haul

Quotations:


AFP seizes 1.2 tonnes of MDMA in Sydney raid, two men charged:

-- Police have charged two Polish men in connection with the seizure of 1.2 tonnes of drugs in Sydney — the biggest haul in the country this year.

Definitions:

seizure:
1. the use of legal authority to take sth from sb;
...

haul:
1. a large amount of sth that has been stolen or that is illegal




Friday, October 14, 2016

Festival of Dangerous Ideas & shake up

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep32


Tony Jones: [Festival of Dangerous Ideas] Good evening and welcome to Q&A live from the Sydney Opera House and the Festival of Dangerous Ideas. I'm Tony Jones. Tonight a Q&A devoted to Shakespeare's dangerous idea that all the world's a stage and all of us are merely players. Well, joining us to play the panel, award-winning writer and actor Katy Mulvany; Indigenous performer and translator Kylie Farmer; the founding artistic director of Bill Shakespeare, John Bill; celebrated Shakespeare scholar Germaine Greer; and philosopher A.C. Anthony Grayling. Please welcome our panel.  Thank you. Now Q&A is live in the Eastern States on the ABC TV, and you can also watch and listen live across Australia on Iview, Facebook and the News radio. It's 400 years since Shakespeare died, but his plays continue to be celebrated, performed, discussed and debated around the world as we'll do tonight. Before, however, we go to our first question, today, Australia actually lost one of its great culture figures in Richard  Neville, and Germaine Greer, a friend of his and old colleague, wants to say something to mark his passing before we go ahead. And I'd like to hand the microphone over to you, Germaine, before we start. 

Tony Jones: [shake up] He shook things up. 

Definitions:

Festival of Dangerous Ideas:
The Festival of Dangerous Ideas is an annual event presented by Sydney Opera House and The Ethics Centre (formerly known as the St James Ethics Centre) that brings leading thinkers and culture creators from around Australia and the world to discuss and debate some of the most important issues of our time

shake sb/sth/things up:
1. to make major changes in an organization or institution, especially with the intention of improving or modernising it.
2. to make somebody feel upset and disturbed;
3. to mix something by shaking it in a container;

Thursday, October 13, 2016

downturn & starch

Quotations:


Housing slump bigger economic threat than China slowdown: Fitch:

-- In a survey of leading fixed interest and bond traders, Fitch found a domestic housing downturn had replaced the prospect of a hard economic landing in China as their biggest worry.

-- At the same time, a string of regulatory initiatives, coupled with active supervision have added starch to bank underwriting standards."

Definitions:

downturn: 
1. a fall in the amount of business that is done; 
2. a time when the economy becomes weaker;

starch:
1. a white carbohydrate food substance found in potatoes, flour, rice, etc.
2. starch prepared in powder form or as a spray and used for making clothes, sheets, etc. 





last-ditch & sounding board

Quotations:


Rebooting your relationship: How couples can avoid complacency and reignite the spark:

-- Usually I am the last-ditch effort to save the relationship.

-- Ms Lambros said she was clear with couples that she could not fix their relationships for them but could be a sounding board and offer suggestions.

Definitions:

last-ditch:
used to describe a final attempt to achieve sth, when there is not much hope of succeeding.

sounding board:
1. someone who listens to your ideas and opinions and tells you whether they think they are good or not;
2. a person or group that gives feedback on preliminary ideas before they are considered for further development;
...





Tuesday, October 11, 2016

benchmark & detract

Quotations:

Executive pay: 'Soft' bonus targets under the spotlight this corporate AGM season:


-- From next year, another soft target, "people and community", will be added to Mr Narev's benchmarks, meaning half of Mr Narev's long term bonus will not be linked to the financial performance of the bank.

-- "If anything, if they're not achieved they should detract from one's remuneration rather than add to it."

Definitions:

benchmark:
something that can be measured and used as a standard that other things can be compared with.

detract:
to reduce the quality, value, or importance of something by taking something away from it.




Monday, October 10, 2016

stirrer & percussionist

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep11


Tony Jones: [cue; uphill; MP; commentator; self-confessed stirrer; percussionist ] I think we've got her. Well, that's all we have time for tonight. Please thank our panel, Sharman Stone, Joseph Tawadros, Germaine Greer, Lisa Singh and Theodore Dalrymple. And Joseph, that's your cue. Next Monday, Q&A will be joining by the man who featured on 4 Corners tonight, billionaire, businessman Clive Palmer, who's facing an uphill battle to retain his seat in Parliament; West Australian Labor MP Alannah MacTiernan, author, commentator and self-confessed stirrer  Jane Caro. We'll tell you the rest during the week. And we'll end tonight with performance by Joseph and his brother, the percussionist, James Tawadros, playing Forbidden Flute. Until next week's Q&A, Good night. 

Definitions:

stirrer:
a person who likes causing trouble, especially between other people, by spreading secrets.

percussionist:
a person who plays percussion instruments.

Sunday, October 9, 2016

cue & uphill

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep11


Tony Jones: [cue; uphill; MP; commentator; self-confessed stirrer; percussionist ] I think we've got her. Well, that's all we have time for tonight. Please thank our panel, Sharman Stone, Joseph Tawadros, Germaine Greer, Lisa Singh and Theodore Dalrymple. And Joseph, that's your cue. Next Monday, Q&A will be joining by the man who featured on 4 Corners tonight, billionaire, businessman Clive Palmer, who's facing an uphill battle to retain his seat in Parliament; West Australian Labor MP Alannah MacTiernan, author, commentator and self-confessed stirrer  Jane Caro. We'll tell you the rest during the week. And we'll end tonight with performance by Joseph and his brother, the percussionist, James Tawadros, playing Forbidden Flute. Until next week's Q&A, Good night. 

Definitions:

cue:
1. an action or event that is a signal for sb to do sth;
...

uphill:
1. sloping upwards;
2. uphill battle/struggle, task, etc.: an argument or a struggle that is difficult to win and takes a lot of effort over a long period of time.

Saturday, October 8, 2016

surface & egregious

Quotations:


Donald Trump apologises for vulgar comments, criticises Bill and Hillary Clinton:

-- A defiant Donald Trump has apologised after a 2005 video surfaced of him making crude comments about women but he says the revelations amount to "nothing more than a distraction".

-- The Republican presidential nominee argued his words were not nearly as egregious as former president Bill Clinton's extramarital affairs.

Definitions:

surface:
1. to suddenly appear or become obvious after having been hidden for a while;
...

egregious:
extremely bad.






Friday, October 7, 2016

abrasion & tavern

Quotations:


Car crashes into Cape York funeral, killing one, seriously injuring 12:

"As would be expected with a structural collapse, we have patients with multiple fractures and abrasions and possibly internal injuries," the Queensland Ambulance Service's Neil Noble said.

-- A Kowanyama resident has told the ABC the local tavern, cafe and bakery had all been closed in an attempt to quell community unrest.

Definitions:

abrasion:
1. a damaged area of the skin where it has been rubbed against sth hard and rough;
2. damage to a surface caused by rubbing sth very hard against it;

tavern:
a pub or an inn

Thursday, October 6, 2016

stoush & downplay

Quotations:


Attorney-General George Brandis denies misleading Parliament over stoush with solicitor-general:

-- Federal Attorney-General George Brandis is trying to downplay a public feud with the nation's second highest law officer, saying he has not misled Parliament over the fight and the pair have never had a "cross word".

Definitions:

stoush:
a fight or dispute.

downplay:
to make people think that sth is less important than it really is.


connectedness & out of hand

Quotations:


ACT election: All Territory public service jobs to be flexible by 2025, Canberra Liberals pledge:

-- "The Canberra Liberals are committed to enhancing women's choices and connectedness, and will work to ensure the ACT Public Service is a leader in workplace flexibility and leads by example developing a culture of flexibility," Liberals spokeswoman Giulia Jones said.

-- "We should evolve in this space, and improvements in flexibility shouldn't be dismissed out of hand."

Definitions:

connectedness:
a feeling that you have a link with sb/sth or are part of a group.

out of hand:
1. immediately and without consideration or explanation;
2. out of control.



Tuesday, October 4, 2016

arm & grill

Quotations:


Commonwealth Bank boss Ian Narev says no-one sacked over CommInsure scandals:

- No Commonwealth Bank staff member has been sacked over scandals involving its insurance arm, the bank has conceded.

- Commonwealth Bank chief executive officer Ian Narev is the first bank boss being grilled by a federal parliamentary inquiry into the sector.

Definitions:

arm:
1. a section of a large organization that deals with one particular activity.
...

grill:
1. to ask sb a lot of questions about their ideas, actions, etc., often in an unpleasant way;
...


Monday, October 3, 2016

immerse & dude

Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep11

Lisa Singh: [immerse] Absolutely, we all grew up learning Shakespeare at school, but then have gone on to continue to, you know, be able to immerse ourselves in Shakespeare every so often in the theatre, and you know, whether you want to laugh or you want to cry, Shakespeare always provides and as Germaine said it's always different and I think that's the beauty of it. 

Tony Jones: Joe.

Joseph Tawadros: [dude; verse] Oh, Shakespeare, I thought he was some Arabic dude, Sheikh Spear, as we'd like to say Shakespeare. Look, he's a great writer. I mean I'm not personally versed in Shakespeare. I'm more a Kahlil Gibran man myself. But, good, well done, Germaine. Sharman. 

Definitions:

immerse:
1. to become completely occupied with something, giving all your time, energy, or concentration to it;
...

dude:
a man.

tarnish & dog

Quotations:


Samsung says over 1 million people globally using Note 7 with safe battery:

-- The recall could cost the company billions of dollars and tarnish its brand image, analysts say.

-- But a string of reports by users in China, the world's top smartphone market, that their Note 7s caught fire have dogged Samsung in a country where they have already fallen out of the top five in terms of market share.

Definitions:

tarnish:
1. to damage somebody's reputation or good name, or become damaged;
...

dog:
1. to cause trouble for someone over a long period of time;
...




Saturday, October 1, 2016

pressing & infuse

Quotations:


Microsoft Creates A 5,000-Person AI Research Team:

-- "At Microsoft, we are focused on empowering both people and organizations, by democratizing access to intelligence to help solve our most pressing challenges. To do this, we are infusing AI into everything we deliver across our computing platforms and experiences."

Definitions:

pressing:
1. needing to be dealt with immediately;
2. difficult to refuse or to ignore;

infuse:
1. to make sb/sth have a particular quality;
2. to have an effect on all parts of sth;


goal post & Briton


Quotations:

qanda_2016_ep11

Germaine Greer: [didactic; whatnot; goal post;] I think we can't do without Shakespeare. He just - we keep having to use Shakespeare, turn back to Shakespeare, treat Shakespeare in different ways  and I've developed this notion that Shakespeare keeps the British sane, because the plays are so difficult. It's difficult to decide what they mean, because they are not actually didactic in that sense, they're not telling you what to think. They're making you think rather than filling you with notions of, you know, the divine right of kings and whatnot. Everything is undermined in Shakespeare. The goal post move all the time. And so we returned to Shakespeare when we're trying to understand the things like would it be better to be authoritarian and punish people for eating sugar, or would it better to persuade them not to be so stupid as to keep eating so much sugar. 

Tony Jones: [Briton] Germaine, how does it keep Britain sane if so few Britons still read him?

Definitions:

goal post:
goal:
1. a frame with a net into which players must kick or hit the ball in order to score a point;

Briton:
a person from Britain.