Thursday, June 30, 2016

autonomy & infantilize

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep29

Brendan O'Neill: [autonomy; infantilize; feminism; obnoxious; consensual; consolatory; rehabilitation; on one's own;] These are autonomous adults. They have freedom. They have autonomy and the problem is that women are being infantilized by this process. So much of modern feminism actually infantilizes women by treating them as incapable of negotiating public life on their own without the assistance of the government or targets and so on, and the thing I find really obnoxious about this discussion is the idea that women make politics more consensual and more consolatory and more friendly and what you have is the rehabilitation of the old prejudice that this is the fairer sex, that they are mothering, that they are caring, my political heroines are not - were not consensual. Bernadette Devlin, the MP for Mid Ulster in the 1970s who strode across the house of commons and punched the home secretary in the face when he lied about bloody Sunday. She wasn't consensual. This idea that women are more consensual than men, more caring, more motherly is actually, in a PC form, it rehabilitates an old prejudice. I think we need let women go, let them run with on their own, and they will make it on their own. They are not children. They are adults.

Definitions:

autonomy:
1. the freedom for a country, a region or an organization to govern itself independently;
2. the ability to act and make decisions without being controlled by anyone else;

infantilize: 
to treat sb as though they are a child. 

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

a host of & white paper

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep29

Kelly O'Dwyer: [ a whole host of] I'll come straight to that, but let me just say this, because what I've heard Richard say was that they have a whole host of  new scenarios to dream up new taxes ...

Kelly O'Dwyer: [federation white paper] to make - it's for the states, though, to make that argument. You need - this is part of the reason we've got the federationwhite paper is try and connect the spending and the revenue.

Definitions:

a host of:
a large number of people or things.

white paper:
a government report that gives information about sth and explains government plans before a new law is introduced.


bell the cat & fically

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep29

Tony Jones: [bell the cat] Okay. All right. Kelly O'Dwyer. I'll bring you in and, well, let's go out to the question which is about GST, and now the New South Wales Premier has belled the cat, are you prepared to jump in and defend raising the GST. 

Kelly O'Dwyer: [fiscally] Well, first, the questioner actually asked a question of the Greens when you're actually going to be fiscally responsible, economical responsible and what I've heard, give me ..

Definitions:

bell the cat:
to be brave and do something dangerous.

fiscally:
fiscal:
connected with government or public money, especially taxes.

Monday, June 27, 2016

on the record & human capital

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep29

Richard Di Natale: [on the record; human capital;] India, in the next decade, have made their statement, that they would no longer buy not a kilo of Australian coal. They will be out of the coal business as far as Australian imports is concerned in the next decade. They are on the record as saying that. And so we have - we have a choice, you can continue to rely on those industries of last century, or you can have a jobs rich, pollution free future based on renewables, on high-tech industries, on increasing investment in science, in research, in innovation, that's where the future this country lies. It relies on those industries where we can make the most advantage of the grate human capital we've got in this country. We're not going to continue to build up our prosperity simply on minerals and resources. And we are the only party - the only party who is prepared to chart a vision, on that 21 century modern economy.

Definitions:

on the record:
said formally or publicly with the knowledge that it may be recorded or disseminated.

human capital:
the people an organization employs, and their skills, knowledge and experience.

Sunday, June 26, 2016

negative gearing & ledger

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep29

Richard Di Natale: [negative gearing; ledger; consumption; ] Thanks for the question. Thanks for the question and I'm really pleased to be able to answer that. We've been tackling the issue of revenue head on. We released the policy into negative gearing which we think is an important reform. It will bring in 40 billion dollars over the next decade. We think the concessions around superannuation need to be addressed and we've taken that issue head on. I think multinational tax avoidance is a big issue and it is on their revenue side of the ledger. I think that you do those things before you start increasing something like a consumption tax. You've got deal with those issues first. They are huge distortions in the market. Now, if we talk broadly about what the economic future for this country looks like, we've got a government that has hitched its prosperity on a business model that's failing; we've got a government that has said that it's committed to coal, to coal exports when the market is telling us that it's an industry on the way out. We've got India not longer buying our coal; we've got the market in Japan flattening; we've got China who are no longer ...

Definitions:

negative gearing:
a tax reduction available to somebody who has borrowed money to pay for an investment such as shares or a house and whose income from that investment is less than the loan repayments;

ledger:
a book in which a bank, a business, etc. records the money it has paid and received;

be generally held & bleed

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep29

Jim Wilkinson: [be generally held; credibility; bleed;]  Senator there is a generally held view that your party is financially naive and lacks economic credibility. You can not rely solely on bleeding the wealthy any more than the government could last year by hitting the needy. You know, naming and shaming, as someone has just said, will not bring in any dollars. It's all good local politics, but that's all it is. Increasing the rate of GST must be a central part of any solution and if done properly, it need not be regressive. Will you, Senator, show political and financial leadership by working with a future government to repair our revenue base by increasing the rate of GST.

Definitions:

be generally held:
to be believed by a lot of people.

bleed:
1. to force sb to pay a lot of money over a period of time;
...

Friday, June 24, 2016

debilitate & symmetry

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep29

Richard Di Natale: [tax haven; slug;mega; gut; slash; debilitate ] Well, where to start. There is 400 billion dollars of money going offshore, 60 billion of it going into tax havens and we're having a debate around GST and whether people should be slugged more for a loaf bread, mainly a tax that impacts most on poor people. Of course people who are earning mega profits here in Australia should pay their fair share. I mean, there's nothing moral about it. This just - it's a decent thing and it's what the country needs if we are to deal with some of our revenue issues. Now, I have to say on - I have to give credit to Christine Milne because she set up this inquiry and we're having this debate now nationally because of the work that she did in the area. And Kelly talks about the ATO and giving them more resources. Well, we've gutted the ATO. There have been hundreds of jobs slashed from the Australia Taxation Office. So, now the way these guys pay their taxes is they sit 're with their lawyers, having a negotiation with a completely debilitated taxation office and they negotiate what a level of tax they want to pay. I mean, imagine going to your accountant and saying: well, you know, what, I think I pay too much tax, let's negotiate how much I can pay. So we've got to resource Australia Taxation Office. The idea of - it's not naming and shaming. It's just getting some transparency.

ichard Di Natale: [symmetry] It's not naming and shaming. It's actually transparency information. As a libertarian, as somebody who believes in market economies surely a symmetry of information is something you're concerned about. And this is what we've got here. We've got these big companies ...

Definitions:

debilitate:
1. to make a country, an organization etc. weaker;
2. to make sb's body or mind weaker;

symmetry:
1. the exact match in size and shape between two halves, parts or sides of sth;
2. the quality of being very similar or equal;


Thursday, June 23, 2016

mega & gut

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep29

Richard Di Natale: [tax haven; slug;mega; gut; slash; debilitate ] Well, where to start. There is 400 billion dollars of money going offshore, 60 billion of it going into tax havens and we're having a debate around GST and whether people should be slugged more for a loaf bread, mainly a tax that impacts most on poor people. Of course people who are earning mega profits here in Australia should pay their fair share. I mean, there's nothing moral about it. This just - it's a decent thing and it's what the country needs if we are to deal with some of our revenue issues. Now, I have to say on - I have to give credit to Christine Milne because she set up this inquiry and we're having this debate now nationally because of the work that she did in the area. And Kelly talks about the ATO and giving them more resources. Well, we've gutted the ATO. There have been hundreds of jobs slashed from the Australia Taxation Office. So, now the way these guys pay their taxes is they sit 're with their lawyers, having a negotiation with a completely debilitated taxation office and they negotiate what a level of tax they want to pay. I mean, imagine going to your accountant and saying: well, you know, what, I think I pay too much tax, let's negotiate how much I can pay. So we've got to resource Australia Taxation Office. The idea of - it's not naming and shaming. It's just getting some transparency.

Definitions:

mega:
very large or impressive.

gut:
1. to make something powerless or ineffective, especially by removing essential parts or features from it;
2. ...

trainers & moralistic

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep29

Brendan O'Neill: [medieval; sphere;convent; trainer; moralistic; displacement;] Yeah, what's with all this naming and shaming. When did politics become so medieval. It's like everywhere you go someone is naming and shaming. On twitter, in the political sphere, in the media. It reminds me of being back convent school when the nuns were always shaming someone for wearing make up or trainers or whatever it was. In my mind this chasing, this moralistic witch hunt of people who do not pay enough tax, it's actually a displacement activity from talking about the economic problems that are faced across the western world.

Definitions:

trainers:
a shoe that you wear for sports or as informal clothing;

moralistic:
having or showing very fixed ideas about what is right and wrong, especially when this causes you to judge other people's behaviour.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

sphere & convent

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep29

Brendan O'Neill: [medieval; sphere;convent; trainer; moralistic; displacement;] Yeah, what's with all this naming and shaming. When did politics become so medieval. It's like everywhere you go someone is naming and shaming. On twitter, in the political sphere, in the media. It reminds me of being back convent school when the nuns were always shaming someone for wearing make up or trainers or whatever it was. In my mind this chasing, this moralistic witch hunt of people who do not pay enough tax, it's actually adisplacement activity from talking about the economic problems that are faced across the western world.

Definitions:

sphere:
1. an area of activity, influence or interest, a particular section of society;
2. ...

convent:
1. a school run by nuns;
2. a building in which nuns ( = members of a femal religious community) live together;

Monday, June 20, 2016

grassroot & medieval

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep29

Kelly O'Dwyer: [grassroot] So, the Australian Taxation Office under the treasury Joe Hockey has actually sent tax officials into thirty major multinational companies to try and understand at grassroots level, exactly what it is going on.

Brendan O'Neill: [medieval; sphere;convent; trainer; moralistic; displacement;] Yeah, what's with all this naming and shaming. When did politics become so medieval. It's like everywhere you go someone is naming and shaming. On twitter, in the political sphere, in the media. It reminds me of being back convent school when the nuns were always shaming someone for wearing make up or trainers or whatever it was. In my mind this chasing, this moralistic witch hunt of people who do not pay enough tax, it's actually adisplacement activity from talking about the economic problems that are faced across the western world.

Definitions:

grassroot:
1. ordinary people regarded as the main body of an organisation's membership;
2. the most basic level of an activity or organisation.

medieval:
1. old-fashioned, especially because lacking modern enlightened attitudes;
2. relating to, involving, belonging to or typical of the Middle Ages in Europe;
3. relating to the period of European history between about the year 1000 ad and the year 1500

Sunday, June 19, 2016

run around & whistle-blowing

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep29

Sam Dastyari: {run around; whistle-blowing;] Yeah, this is - Look,  really look, sorry.This is something that the government has been kind of running around with and, of course, I did not and wouldn't. But, look, what we need in this space is a lot more transparency.  We need a lot more facts out there. We need a lot information, We need a lot more whistle-blowing, we need to make sure that we have people out there actually talking about what's going on, because the enormity of this. And, you know, one of the big ideas and again this wasn't the question, but I'll take the opportunity take about it, is ...

Definitions:

run around:
1. to spend a lot of time with sb/sth;
2. to behave promiscuously;

whistle-blowing:
whistle-blower: a person informs people in authority or the public that the company they work for is doing sth wrong or illegal.

Saturday, June 18, 2016

in the name of & get at

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep29

Katy Faust: [in the name of] Well, it's not wrong. And we know that it's not wrong because when kids lose a relationship of the parent, they really tend to suffer. I think most of us can look at our childhoods and say "That hurt. When I lost parent, that hurt." And so we don't want to inflict intentional motherlessness and fatherlessness on kids in the name of progress.

Sam Dastyari: [out of; get at] Thank you and actually Andrew Tran is a great blogger and he does a lot of stuff on this issue out of Perth. I have seen his tweets and that he writes quite a bit about it. So, it's nice to actually put a face to the tweets. Look, the point that he is, I think, getting at and I think it's the right point is a lot of what's going on is legal.

Definitions:

in the name of:
1. for the same of something;
2. by the authority of.

get at:
1. to discover or find out something;
2. ...

Friday, June 17, 2016

newness & activist

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep29

Brendan O'Neil: [newness] This is what's new. So, why would you not admit the newness of the institution. Why do you pretend that it's the same as the other institution that has existed for thousands of years. 

Brendan O'Neil: [activist] Gay marriage activists, gay marriage activists, they compare themselves, they -- hold on, hold on - they compare themselves to Martin Luther King. Martin Luther King said "we do not hate our enemies, we love them" the exact opposite is the case of gay marriage activists, the exact opposite.

Definitions:

newness:
Newness is the state or quality of being new, novel or unused. When you are just starting a school for the first time and feel disoriented and a bit confused, this is an example of newness.

activist:
a person who works to achieve political or social change, especially as a member of an organisation with particular aims.

Thursday, June 16, 2016

facetious & broker

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep29

Brendan O'Neil: [oversight; facetious; broker; traditionalist;] It's about becoming part of a community. My problem, my problem with the gay marriage debate is that it actually increases the state's oversight a family life rather than decreasing it. So, the presentation of this as a liberal issue is completely facetious. This is about the state having the right to redefine the moral meaning of marriage. Now the modern state brokers marriage. It brokers it. It gives you a certificate. It says your are married, thumbs up, well done. This gives the state the right to redefine the moral meaning of marriage which has been an organic thing developed over thousands of years. For me, as a libertarian that's a step to far and I think for you to redefine a view that was standard for thousands of years as a bigotry, that in itself is a form of bigotry, because what you are saying is that you will not toleratetraditionalists, you will not tolerate religious people, you will not tolerate Christians.


Definitions:

facetious:
trying to appear amusing and intelligent at a time when other people do not think it is appropriate, and when it would be better to be serious.

broker:
1. to arrange the details for an agreement, especially between different countries;
2. ...

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

monastery & inscrutable

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

"Once a monastery," said Mr. Pepper.

She was half-moved to cry, "Stop, William; explain!" and would have returned to the subject at luncheon if William had not shown himself inscrutable and chill, lifting fragments of salad on the point of his fork, with the gesture of a man pronging seaweed, detecting gravel, suspecting germs.


Definitions:

monastery:
a building in which monks ( = members of a male religious community) live together.

inscrutable:
if a person or their expression is inscrutable, it is hard to know what they are thinking or feeling, because they do not show any emotion.

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

subterfuge & orchestra

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

The effect of these subterfuges was a little dashed by Ridley, who, after regarding Pepper for some moments, sighed aloud, "Poor fellow!" and inwardly speculated upon the unkindness of women.

The sight fulfilled the same purpose as an orchestra in a London restaurant, and silence had its setting. 

Definitions:

subterfuge:
a secret, usually dishonest, way of behaving.

orchestra:
a large group of people who play various musical instruments together, led by a conductor.

Sunday, June 12, 2016

cascade & peacock

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

"That great stream!" Helen would begin, gazing as if she saw a visionary cascade, "I've a good mind to go with you myself, Willoughby -- only I can't. Think of the sunsets and the moonrises -- I believe the colour are unimaginable."

"There are wild peacocks," Rachel hazarded. 

Definitions:

cascade:
1. a small waterfall, especially one of several falling down a steep slope with rocks;
2. ...

peacock:
a large male bird with long blue and green tail feathers that it can spread out like a fan.

Saturday, June 11, 2016

forcibly & terrier

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

The indecency of the whole place struck Mrs. Chailey forcibly. 

Standing in the bare stone hall, and surveying a staircase of superb breadth, but cracked and carpetless, she further ventured the opinion that there were rats, as large as terriers at home, and that if one put one's foot down with any force one would come through the floor.

Definitions:

forcibly:
1. in a way that involves the use of physical force;
2. in a way that makes sth very clear;

terrier:
a small active dog. There are many types of terrier.

Friday, June 10, 2016

mob & indecency

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

A few tall trees shaded it, and round bushes with wax-like flowers mobbed their heads together in a row.

The indecency of the whole place struck Mrs. Chailey forcibly. 

Definitions:

mob:
1. to crowd into and fill a place;
2. if a crowd of birds or animals mob another bird or animal, they gather round it and attack it;
...

indecency:
1. the offensive or shocking nature of something;
2. behaviour that is thought to be morally or sexually offensive.

pagoda & verandah

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

The villa was a roomy white house, which, as is the case with most continental houses, looked to an English eye frail, ramshackle, and absurdly frivolous, more like a pagoda in a tea-garden than a place where one slept.

In the circular piece of ground in front of the verandah were two cracked vases, from which red flowers drooped, with a stone fountain between them, now parched in the sun.

Definitions:

pagoda:
a temple (= religious building) in S or E Asia in the form of a tall tower with several levels, each of which has its own roof that extends beyond the walls.

verandah:
a roofed platform along the outside of a house, level with ground floor

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

ramshackle & frivolous

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

The villa was a roomy white house, which, as is the case with most continental houses, looked to an English eye frail, ramshackle, and absurdly frivolous, more like a pagoda in a tea-garden than a place where one slept.

Definitions:

ramshackle:
1. in a very bad condition and needing repair;
2. badly organized or designed and not likely to last very long.

frivolous:
1. silly or amusing, especially when such behaviour is not suitable;
2. having no useful or serious purpose.

Monday, June 6, 2016

canter & roomy

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Higher they went, until Ridley and Rachel walked behind; next they turned along a lane scattered with stones, where Mr. Pepper raised his stick and silently indicated a shrub, bearing among sparse leaves a voluminous purple blossom; and at a rickety canter the last stage of the way was accomplished.

The villa was a roomy white house, which, as is the case with most continental houses, looked to an English eye frail, ramshackle, and absurdly frivolous, more like a pagoda in a tea-garden than a place where one slept.

Definitions:

canter:
1. a movement of a horse at a speed that is fairly fast but not very fast; 
2. to move or make a horse move at a canter;

roomy:
having a lot of space inside.

Saturday, June 4, 2016

voluminous & rickety

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Higher they went, until Ridley and Rachel walked behind; next they turned along a lane scattered with stones, where Mr. Pepper raised his stick and silently indicated a shrub, bearing among sparse leaves a voluminous purple blossom; and at a rickety canter the last stage of the way was accomplished.

Definitions:

voluminous:
1. very large;
2. very long and detailed;

rickety:
1. in bad condition, unstable, and likely to collapse;
2. a rickety structure or piece of furniture is likely to break if you put any weight on it, often because it is old;

member & sparse

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Taking seats in a carriage drawn by long-tailed horses with pheasants' feathers erect between their ears, the Ambroses, Mr. Peper, and Rachel rattled out of the harbour. The day increased in heat as they drove up the hill. The road passed through the town, where men seemed to be beating brass and crying "Water," where the passage was blocked by mules and cleared by whips and curses, where the women walked barefoot, their heads balancing baskets, and cripples hastily displayed mutilated members; it issued among steep green fields, not so green but that the earth showed through.

Higher they went, until Ridley and Rachel walked behind; next they turned along a lane scattered with stones, where Mr. Pepper raised his stick and silently indicated a shrub, bearing among sparse leaves a voluminous purple blossom; and at a rickety canter the last stage of the way was accomplished.

Definitions:

member:
1. a part or organ of a plant or animal body, especially a limb;
...

sparse:
only present in small amounts or numbers and often spread over a large area.

Thursday, June 2, 2016

pheasant & mutilate

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Taking seats in a carriage drawn by long-tailed horses with pheasants' feathers erect between their ears, the Ambroses, Mr. Peper, and Rachel rattled out of the harbour. The day increased in heat as they drove up the hill. The road passed through the town, where men seemed to be beating brass and crying "Water," where the passage was blocked by mules and cleared by whips and curses, where the women walked barefoot, their heads balancing baskets, and cripples hastily displayed mutilated members; it issued among steep green fields, not so green but that the earth showed through.

Definitions:

pheasant:
a large bird with long tail, the male of which is brightly coloured. People sometimes shoot pheasants for sport or food meat from this bird is also called pheasant.

mutilate:
1. to damage sb's body very severely, especially by cutting or tearing off part of it;
2. to damage sth very badly.

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

sloop & purser

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Somewhere about the middle of the seventeenth century a single sloop watched its season and slipped out by night, bearing within it all that was left of the great British colony, a few men, a few women, and perhaps a dozen dusky children.

Often, leaning upon the column in the verandah, he had watched the English ships with English schoolmasters for pursers steaming into the bay.

Definitions:

sloop:
a small sailing ship with one mast ( = a post to support the sails.)

purser:
an officer on a ship who is responsible for taking care of the passengers, and for the accounts.