Tuesday, May 31, 2016

vengeful & rapacious

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

From the interior came Indians with subtle poisons, naked bodies, and painted idols; from the sea came vengeful Spaniards and rapacious Portuguese; exposed to all these enemies ( though the climate proved wonderfully kind and the earth abundant) the English dwindled away and all but disappeared.

Definitions:

vengeful:
showing a desire to punish sb who has harmed you.

rapacious:
wanting more money or goods than you need or have a right to.

Sunday, May 29, 2016

tawny & conflagration

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

The Spaniards, bloated with fine living upon the fruits of the miraculous land, fell in heaps; but the hardy Englishmen, tawny with sea-voyaging, hairy for lack of razors, with muscles like wire, fangs greedy for flesh, and fingers itching for gold, despatched the wounded, drove the dying into the sea, and soon reduced the natives to a state of superstitious wonderment.

But it must be supposed that the political mind of that age lacked imagination, and, merely for want of a few thousand pounds and a few thousand men, the spark died that should have been a conflagration.

Definitions:

tawny:
brownish-yellow in colour.

conflagration:
a very large fire that destroys a lot of land or buildings.

Saturday, May 28, 2016

barque & unmanned

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

The piece of information that died within him was to the effect that three hundred years ago five Elizabethan barques had anchored where the Euphrosyne now floated. Half-drawn up upon the beach lay an equal number of Spanish galleons, unmanned, for the country was still a virgin land behind a veil.

Definitions:

barque:
a sailing ship with three or more masts ( = posts that support the sails)

unmanned:
if a machine, a vehicle, a place or an activity is unmanned, it does not have or need a person to control or operate it. 

Friday, May 27, 2016

sultry & odd

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

The hour being still early, the whole view was exquisitely light and airy; the blues ad greens of sky and tree were intense but not sultry.

"Three hundred years odd," said Mr. Pepper meditatively at length.

Definitions:

sultry:
1. oppressively hot and damp;
2. giving a suggestion of underlying passion and sensuality;
3. sultry weather is unpleasant because the air is hot and slightly wer;
4. a sultry woman is sexually attractive.

odd:
1. approximately or a little more than the number mentioned;
...

Thursday, May 26, 2016

thrice & pinnacle

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Absorbed in her letters she did not notice that she had left the Euphrosyne, and felt no sadness when the ship lifted up her voice and bellowed thrice like a cow separated from its calf.

Mountains whose sides were flushed with red, but whose crowns were bald, rose as a pinnacle, half-concealing another pinnacle behind it.

Definitions:

thrice:
three times;

pinnacle:
1. a high pointed piece of rock, especially at the top of a mountain;
2.  the most important or successful part of sth;
3. a small pointed stone decoration built on the roof of a building.

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

jerk & recumben

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

One's constituents like to be fed, I believe. In all these ways Rachel could be of great help to me. So," he wound up, "I should be very glad, if we arrange this visit (which must be upon a business footing, mind), if you could see your way to helping my girl, bringing her out - she's a little shy now, - making a woman of her, the kind of woman her mother would have liked her to be, " he ended, jerking his head at the photograph.

By nine o'clock the Euphrosyne had taken up her position in the middle of a great bay; she dropped her anchor; immediately, as if she were a recumbent giant requiring examination, small boats came swarming about her.

Definitions:

jerk:
to move or to make sth move with a sudden short sharp movement.

recumbent:
lying down; describes a plant or animal part that rests or leans against something else


Tuesday, May 24, 2016

pucker & constituent

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

The need of sitting absolutely still before a Cockney photographer had given her lips a queer little pucker, and her eyes for the same reason looked as though she thought the whole situation ridiculous.

One's constituents like to be fed, I believe. In all these ways Rachel could be of great help to me. So," he wound up, "I should be very glad, if we arrange this visit (which must be upon a business footing, mind), if you could see your way to helping my girl, bringing her out - she's a little shy now, - making a woman of her, the kind of woman her mother would have liked her to be, " he ended, jerking his head at the photograph.


Definitions:

pucker:
to form or to make sth form small folds or lines.

constituent:
1. one of the parts of sth that combine to form the whole;
2. a person who lives and can vote in a constituency;

Sunday, May 22, 2016

filmy & Cockney

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

She found him sitting in his room working, applying a stout blue pencil authoritatively to bundles of filmy paper.

The need of sitting absolutely still before a Cockney photographer had given her lips a queer little pucker, and her eyes for the same reason looked as though she thought the whole situation ridiculous.

Definitions:

filmy:
thin and almost transparent.

Cockney:
1. the accent or dialect of native Londoners from the East End;
...

Saturday, May 21, 2016

stout & authoritatively

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

She found him sitting in his room working, applying a stout blue pencil authoritatively to bundles of filmy paper.

Definitions:​​

stout:
1. strong and thick;
2. rather fat;
3. brave and determined;

authoritatively:
authoritative:
1. that you can trust and respect as true and correct;
2. showing that you expect people to obey and respect you;

hitherto & candidly

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Rachel explained that most people had hitherto been symbols; but that when they talked to one they ceased to be symbols, and became - "I could listen to them for ever!" she exclaimed.

"I really can't tell you," replied Helen candidly, after a moment's thought.

Definitions:​​

hitherto:
until now; until the particular time you are talking about;

candidly:
in a frank manner, telling the truth;

Thursday, May 19, 2016

thimble & glamour

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

"She was quite nice, but a thimble-pated(?) creature," Helen continued.

The glamour insensibly faded a little both from Richard and Clarissa.

Definitions:​​

thimble:
a small metal or plastic object that you wear on the end of your finger to protect it when sewing or used to push a needle through fabric.

glamour:
1. the attractive and exciting quality that makes a person, a job or a place seem special, often because of wealth or status;
2. physical beauty that also suggests wealth or success;



Wednesday, May 18, 2016

ingenuously & out of proportion

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

"No," she answered ingenuously.

The pity is to get things out of proportion. 

Definitions:​​

ingenuously: 
ingenuous:
honest, innocent and willing to trust people.

out of proportion:
if a reaction or result is out of proportion, it is too strong or serious for the thing or situation that has caused it.

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

bloated & bolt upright

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

"But I didn't mind till afterwards; when -" she paused, and saw the figure of the bloated little man again - "I became terrified."

"No," said Rachel, sitting bolt upright, "I shan't do that. I shall think about it all day and all night until I find out exactly what it does mean."

Definitions:​​

bloated:
1. excessively large;
2. a bloated organization or system is not effective because it is too large or has too many workers;
3. swollen with liquid, air or gas.

bolt upright:
with your back very straight.

Monday, May 16, 2016

pompous & twitch

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

"Pompous and sentimental."

"Tell me what happened," said Helen. She had to keep her lips from twitching as she listened to Rachel's story.

Definitions:​​

pompous:
showing that you think you are more important than other people, especially by using long and formal words.

twitch:
1. if a part of your body twitches, or if you twitch it, it makes a sudden quick movement, sometimes one that you can not control;
2. to give sth a short sharp pull;

Sunday, May 15, 2016

languor & listlessness

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Rachel's obvious languor and listlessness made her an easy prey, and indeed Helen had devised a kind of trap.

Definitions:​​

languor:
the pleasant state of feeling lazy and without energy.

listlessness:
listless:
having no energy or enthusiasm.

Saturday, May 14, 2016

congregate & jersey

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Sailors were shouldering the luggage, and people were beginning to congregate. There were Captain Cobbold, Mr. Grice, Willoughby, Helen, and an obscure grateful man in a blue jersey.

Definitions:​​

congregate:
to come together in a group.

jersey:
1. a knitted piece of clothing made of wool or cotton for the upper part of the body, with long sleeves and no buttons;

scuffle & flyleaf

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

All night long barbarian men harassed the ship; they came scuffling down the passages, and stopped to snuffle at her door.

With a silver pencil she wrote her name and address on the flyleaf of Persuation, and gave the book to Rachel.

Definitions:

scuffle:
1. to move quickly making a quiet rubbing noise;
2. to fight or struggle with each other for a short time, in a way that is not very serious;

flyleaf:
an empty page at the beginning or end of a book.

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

pitted & ooze

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

His face was pitted and like the face of an animal. The wall behind him oozed with damp, which collected into drops and slid down.

Definitions:

pitted:
1. having small marks or holes in the surface;
2. having had the large hard seed ( the pit ) removed;

ooze:
1. if a thick liquid oozes from a place, or if sth oozes a thick liquid, the liquid flows from the place slowly;
2. if sb/sth oozes a particular characteristic, quality, etc., they show it strongly.

Monday, May 9, 2016

squat & gibber

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

At length the tunnel opened and became a vault; she found herself trapped in it, bricks meeting her wherever she turned, alone with a little deformed man who squatted on the floor gibbering, with long nails.

Definitions:

squat:
1. to sit on your heels with your knees bent up close to your body;
...

gibber:
to speak quickly in a way that is difficult to understand, often because of fear.

Sunday, May 8, 2016

platitude & pallor

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Formal platitudes were manufactured with effort, but Willoughby was kindled.

After dinner, sitting alone with Rachel under the great swinging lamp, Helen was struck by her pallor

Definitions:

platitude:
a comment or statement that has been made very often before and is therefore not interesting.

pallor:
pale colouring of the face, especially because of illness or fear.

Saturday, May 7, 2016

detached & exultation

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Rising and falling with smooth and graceful movements in the hollows of the waves they seemed singularly detached and unconcerned.

"You're peaceful," she said. She became peaceful too, at the same time possessed with a strange exultation. 

Definitions:

detached:
1. describes a buildings that stands on its own and is not joined to another building;
2. ...

exultation:
great pride or happiness, especially because of sth exciting that has happened;

inestimable & singularly

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

You have an inestimable power -- for good or for evil.

Rising and falling with smooth and graceful movements in the hollows of the waves they seemed singularly detached and unconcerned.

Definitions:

inestimable:
too great to calculate;

singularly:
very; in an unusual way;

Thursday, May 5, 2016

whirlpool & reticence

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

They stood in a whirlpool of wind; papers began flying round in circles, the door crashed to, and they tumbled, laughing, into chairs. 

This reticence - this isolation - that's what's the matter with modern life! 

Definitions:

whirlpool:
1. a place in a river or the sea where currents of water spin round very fast;
2. something that has or seems to have the action, motion, or power of a whirlpool;

reticence:
the quality of being reticent; reserve.

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

muffler & buffet

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Richard twisted a muffler twice round his throat and struggled up on deck.

Pride glowed in his eye as he let the wind buffet him and stood firm.

Definitions:

muffler:
a thick piece of cloth worn around the neck for warmth.

buffet:
to knock or push sb/sth roughly from side to side.

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

jolly & cloister

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

"Good, then, is indefinable," he read out. "How jolly to think that's going on still!

I can remember arguing until five in the morning with Duffy - now Secretary for India - pacing round and round those cloisters until we decided it was too late to go to bed, and we went for a ride instead. 

Definitions:

jolly:
1. happy and cheerful;
2. enjoyable;

cloister:
1. a covered passage with arches around a square garden, usually forming part of a cathedral, convent or monastery.
2. life in a convent or monastery;

Monday, May 2, 2016

cook one's goose & metaphysics

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

"You've cooked your goose!" said Helen brightly.

"We can't make you take us seriously, Mrs. Ambrose," he protested. "May I ask how you've spent your time? Reading - philosophy?" (He saw the black book.) "Metaphysics and fishing!" he exclaimed. "If I had to live again I believe I should devote myself to one or the other." 

Definitions:

cook one's goose:
spoil someone's plans; cause someone's downfall

metaphysics:
the branch of philosophy that deals with the nature of existence, truth and knowledge.

Sunday, May 1, 2016

undertake & hob

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

"This is a great undertaking of his, " Richard continued. "It's a business that won't stop with ships, I should say.

D'you know, I can never work without a kettle on the hob. 

Definitions:

undertake:
1. to promise to do something;
2. to agree to be responsible for a job or a project and do it;
3. make oneself responsible for;
4. to begin to do something or to set out on something;

hob:
1. the top part of a cooker where food is cooked in pans; a similar surface that is built into a kitchen unit and is separate from the oven;
2. a metal shelf at the side of a fire, used in the past for heating pans, etc. on.