Saturday, April 30, 2016

hearty & on the score of

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

"Now, I should advise a hearty tea, then a brisk walk on deck; and by dinner-time you'll be clamouring for beef, eh?" He went off laughing, excusing himself on the score of business.

Definitions:

hearty:
1. a hearty meal is large;
2. ...

on the score of:
because of.

Friday, April 29, 2016

wash out & convalescence

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

"Go and get a breath of air, Dick," she said. "You look quite washed out ... How nice you smell! ... And be polite to that women. She was so kind to me."

"There are three stages of convalescence, I always say," broke in the hearty voice of Willoughby. "The milk stage, the bread-and-butter stage, and the roast-beef stage.

Definitions:

wash out:
1. to make somebody exhausted;
2. ...

convalescence:
a period of time when you get well again after an illness or a medical operation; the process of getting well.

Thursday, April 28, 2016

tweed & lapel

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

At four o'clock he woke from sleep and saw the sunlight make a vivid angle across the red plush curtains and the grey tweed trousers.

He stood beside his wife. She pulled him down to her by the lapel of his coat, kissed him, and held him fast for a minute.

Definitions:

tweed:
a type of thick rough cloth made of wool that has small spots of different coloured thread in it.

lapel:
one of the two front parts of the top of a coat or jacket that are joined to the collar and are folded back.

Sunday, April 24, 2016

traverse & contemplate

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

They looked, and beheld a complete yellow circle of sun; next minute it was traversed by sailing stands of cloud, and then completely hidden.

She did not attempt to sit up; her husband stood on his feet, contemplated his waistcoat and trousers, shook his head, and then lay down again.

Definitions:

traverse:
1. to cross an area of land or water;

contemplate:
1. to look at sb/sth in a careful way for a long time.
...



Friday, April 22, 2016

petticoat & void

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Her petticoats, however, rose above her knees.

Instantly the world dropped into shape; they were no longer atoms flying in the void, but people riding a triumphant ship on the back of the sea.

Definitions:

petticoat:
a piece of women's underwear like a thin dress or skirt, worn under a dress or skirt.

void:
a large empty space.

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

agony & flap

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Pale agonies crossed Mrs. Dalloway in waves. When the curtains flapped, grey lights puffed across her.

Definitions:

agony:
extreme physical or mental pain.

flap:
1. to move or to make sth move up and down or from side to side, often making a noise;
...

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

tumbler & contortion

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Planting her feet wide, Helen contrived to pour champagne into a tumbler with a tooth-brush in it.
 
"There's a tooth-brush in it," murmured Clarissa, and smiled; it might have been the contortion of one weeping. 

Definitions:

tumbler:
1. a glass of drinking out of, with a flat bottom, straight sides and no handle or stem;
2. ...

contortion:
1. the state of the face or body being twisted out of its natural shape;
2. a movement which twists the body out of its natural shape; 

Sunday, April 17, 2016

dissipate & plant

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Clarissa opened one eye. It gave her an incredibly dissipated appearance. 

Planting her feet wide, Helen contrived to pour champagne into a tumbler with a tooth-brush in it. 

Definitions:

dissipate:
1. to waste sth, such as time or money especially by not planning the best way of using it;
...
 
plant:
1. to place sth or yourself firmly in a particular place or position;
...


wedge & wizened

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

For comfort they retreated to their cabins, where with tightly wedged feet they let the ship bounce and tumble. 

Rachel had just enough consciousness to suppose herself a donkey on the summit of a moor in a hail-storm, with its coat blown into furrows; then she became a wizened tree, perpetually driven back by the salt Atlantic gale. 

Definitions:

wedge:
1. to put or squeeze sth tightly into a narrow space, so that it cannot move easily;
...

wizened:
looking smaller and having many folds and lines in the skin, because of being old.

Thursday, April 14, 2016

propel & bandanna

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

On the following day they met - but as flying leaves meet in the air. Sick they were not; but the wind propelled them hastily into rooms, violently downstairs.

They wore fur coats; and Helen was never seen without a bandanna on her head.

Definitions:

propel:
1. to move, drive or push sth forward or in a particular direction;
2. to force sb to move in a particular direction or to get into a particular situation;

bandanna:
a piece of brightly coloured cloth worn around the neck or head;

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

blanch & asparagus

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out
She who had been a broad-backed dray-horse, upon whose hind-quarters pierrots might waltz, became a colt in a field. The plates slanted away from the knives, and Mr.s Dalloway's face blanched for a second as she helped herself and saw the potatoes roll this way and that.

Richard faced three meals, eating valiantly at each; but at the third, certain glazed asparagus swimming in oil finally conquered him.

Definitions:

blanch:
1. to become pale because you are shocked or frightened;
...

asparagus:
a plant whose young green or white stems are cooked and eaten as a vegetable;

Friday, April 8, 2016

Pierrort & slant

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out
She who had been a broad-backed dray-horse, upon whose hind-quarters pierrots might waltz, became a colt in a field. The plates slanted away from the knives, and Mr.s Dalloway's face blanched for a second as she helped herself and saw the potatoes roll this way and that.

Definitions:

Pierrort
a clown with a pointed white hat and white clothes whose face is painted white and made to look sad.

slant:
1. to slope or to make sth slope in a particular direction or at a particular angle;
2. 

Thursday, April 7, 2016

pitch & drayhorse

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Even at tea the floor rose beneath their feet and pitched too low again, and at dinner the ship seemed to groan and strain as though a lash were descending. She who had been a broad-backed dray-horse, upon whose hind-quarters pierrots might waltz, became a colt in a field.

Definitions:

pitch:
1. to throw sb/sth with force;
...

drayhorse:
a large horse used for pulling a dray.

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

gesticulate & admiral

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

"Warships, Dick! Over there! Look!" Clarissa, released from Mr. Grice, appreciative of all his seaweeds, skimmed towards them, gesticulating.

At lunch the talk was all of valour and death, and the magnificent qualities of British admirals.

Definitions:

gesticulate:
to move your hands and arms about in order to attract attention or make sb understand what you are saying.

admiral:
an officer of very high rank in the navy.

Tuesday, April 5, 2016

fallacy & chock-full

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

It's a fallacy to think that children are happy. 

Here I sit; there you sit; both, I doubt not, chock-full of the most interesting experiences, ideas, emotions; yet how communicate?

Definitions:

fallacy:
1. a false idea that many people believe is true;
2. a false way of think about sth;

chock-full:
chockfull:
1. crammed with something;
2. very full, especially with things that are pleasant or enjoyable;

Monday, April 4, 2016

thrusting & jumbled

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

Vanity, irritation, and a thrusting desire to be understood, urged her to make another attempt.

She was haunted by absurd jumbled ideas - how, if one went back far enough, everything perhaps was intelligible; everything was in common; for the mammoths who pastured in the fields of Richmond High Street had turned into paving stones and boxes full of ribbon, and her aunts.

Definitions:

thrusting:
tending to pursue ambitions aggressively.

jumbled:
1. mixed together in an untidy way;
2. confused;

Sunday, April 3, 2016

exalted & statesmanship

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

I can conceive no more exalted aim - to be the citizen of the Empire.

You have very great virtues; I am the first, I hope, to admit that; but  I have never met a woman who ever saw what is meant by statesmanship.

Definitions:

exalted:
1. in very high spirits;
2. high in rank, position, or esteem;
3. grand or noble in character;
4. an exalted position is an important position in an organization or in society;
5. extremely happy and proud;

statesmanship:
skill in managing state affairs;

Saturday, April 2, 2016

paternally & banter

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

"It's far better that you should know nothing," he said paternally, "and you wrong yourself, I'm sure. You play very nicely, I'm told, and I've no doubt you've read heaps of learned books."

Elderly banter would no longer check her.

Definitions:

paternally:
paternal:
1. relating to fathers or considered characteristic of a father;
2. being on a father's side of a family;

banter:
friendly remarks and jokes.

Friday, April 1, 2016

fad & drawback

Quotations:

Complete Works of Virginia Woolf: The Voyage Out

It was a fad of my father's.

But, good Lord, don't run away with the idea that I don't see the drawbacks - horrors - unmentionable things done in our very midst! I'm under no illusions.

Definitions:

fad:
something that people are interested in for only a short period of time;

drawback:
1. a disadvantage or problem that makes sth a less attractive idea;
2. to move away from someone;
3. to pull something such as a curtain into an open position;