Thursday, July 30, 2015

outsource & sneakers

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Amanda Vanstone: [ditto;op-shop;  Royal Flying Doctor Service; in effect; outsource; sneakers;] Well, ditto to everything he said I once was the Minister who had the responsibility for volunteering and we are great at it.  From 14 up to all ages you can't imagine are choosing ways and places to give and often people who haven't got the money to give, as Peter said, you've got to have a sliding scale for this sort of thing. There is a woman who runs an op-shop for the Royal Flying Doctor Service in the Riverland, she's raised hundreds and thousands of dollars over her time in running this op shop. She couldn't give hundreds thousands dollars, but,  in effect, she has by giving her time. I have a couple of concerns with the notion of, you know, just giving your potion of your income, because I think it's an outsourcing goodness to someone else and I don't think you should be able to do that, and I think we actually have to focus on trying to be better people ourselves and it will come from that, we have, as Peter says, become very materialistic, you know, kids don't share rooms any more, they have their own room; they have a TV, you know, they don't go to school unless they've got the right snacks. So, I don't disagree with any of the shocking way we've developed into materialists. I think the way out of that, though, is not just outsource the goodness and say, well, I give some of my money so I'm a good person, you have to actually be a good person.

Definitions:

outsource:
to arrange for sb outside a company to do work or provide goods for that company;

sneakers:
a shoe with a rubber sole and, usually, a cloth upper.

Royal Flying Doctor Service & in effect

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Amanda Vanstone: [ditto;op-shop;  Royal Flying Doctor Service; in effect; outsource; sneakers;] Well, ditto to everything he said I once was the Minister who had the responsibility for volunteering and we are great at it.  From 14 up to all ages you can't imagine are choosing ways and places to give and often people who haven't got the money to give, as Peter said, you've got to have a sliding scale for this sort of thing. There is a woman who runs an op-shop for the Royal Flying Doctor Service in the Riverland, she's raised hundreds and thousands of dollars over her time in running this op shop. She couldn't give hundreds thousands dollars, but,  in effect, she has by giving her time. I have a couple of concerns with the notion of, you know, just giving your potion of your income, because I think it's an outsourcing goodness to someone else and I don't think you should be able to do that, and I think we actually have to focus on trying to be better people ourselves and it will come from that, we have, as Peter says, become very materialistic, you know, kids don't share rooms any more, they have their own room; they have a TV, you know, they don't go to school unless they've got the right snacks. So, I don't disagree with any of the shocking way we've developed into materialists. I think the way out of that, though, is not just outsource the goodness and say, well, I give some of my money so I'm a good person, you have to actually be a good person.

Definitions:

Royal Flying Doctor Service: (RFDS, informally known as The Flying Doctor) is one of the largest and most comprehensive aeromedical organisations in the world. It provides emergency and primary health care services for those living in rural, remote and regional areas of Australia. It is a not-for-profit organisation which provides health care to people who cannot access a hospital or general practice due to the vast distances of the Outback.

in effect:
in fact; actually;

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

ditto & op-shop

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Amanda Vanstone: [ditto;op-shop;  Royal Flying Doctor Service; in effect; outsource; sneakers;] Well, ditto to everything he said I once was the Minister who had the responsibility for volunteering and we are great at it.  From 14 up to all ages you can't imagine are choosing ways and places to give and often people who haven't got the money to give, as Peter said, you've got to have a sliding scale for this sort of thing. There is a woman who runs an op-shop for the Royal Flying Doctor Service in the Riverland, she's raised hundreds and thousands of dollars over her time in running this op shop. She couldn't give hundreds thousands dollars, but,  in effect, she has by giving her time. I have a couple of concerns with the notion of, you know, just giving your potion of your income, because I think it's an outsourcing goodness to someone else and I don't think you should be able to do that, and I think we actually have to focus on trying to be better people ourselves and it will come from that, we have, as Peter says, become very materialistic, you know, kids don't share rooms any more, they have their own room; they have a TV, you know, they don't go to school unless they've got the right snacks. So, I don't disagree with any of the shocking way we've developed into materialists. I think the way out of that, though, is not just outsource the goodness and say, well, I give some of my money so I'm a good person, you have to actually be a good person.

Definitions:

ditto:
used instead of repeating something that has just been said to indicate that the same thing applies to you.

op-shop:
opportunity shop, a shop or store that sells clothes and other goods given by people to raise money for a charity.

Monday, July 27, 2015

in-kind & holistic

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Mark Butler: [brunt; leverage; in-kind; charitable; holistic; settled;] Well, I might just make very brief comment about foreign aid. It's quite clear the foreign aid projections which had started to rise very significantly over the years, took the major brunt of budget cuts from the government last year and that was the decision that the government took that, I think, was probably regarded as an easy decision but I think it was a poor one. But I want to address the question more particularly, because Australia has seen a lower rate of giving, in financial terms, than countries to which we usually compare ourselves, like the UK, the US and Canada, and we've seen it for some time, and I think it's interesting to reflect on that. I't's been increasing, but still at slightly lower rate. And I don't know whether that's got something to do with the fact that we're very highly leveraged. We've got significant household debts because of much higher house prices. But you know, it's worth examining that. What we do do though, better than most other countries is volunteer, as Greg said. Our giving rates are a little bit lower than average in the OECD. Our volunteer rates that in-kind contribution are substantially higher than OECD average and they have been rising very significantly for many years. I think the last time I looked it was about 700 million unpaid hours of volunteering are performed by Australian adults, not to mention what children do as well. I mean, that's worth a very substantial amount and is utterly critical to the ability of a lot of church and charitable organizations to keep functioning. So, I think we also need to be holistic in thinking about giving, not just about financial giving, but also the sort of in-kind volunteering, that's a much more settled part of Australian culture, I think.  


Definitions:

in-kind:
in the form of goods and services rather than in cash.

holistic:
thinking about the whole of something, and not just dealing with particular aspects

brunt & leverage

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Mark Butler: [brunt; leverage; in-kind; charitable; holistic; settled;] Well, I might just make very brief comment about foreign aid. It's quite clear the foreign aid projections which had started to rise very significantly over the years, took the major brunt of budget cuts from the government last year and that was the decision that the government took that, I think, was probably regarded as an easy decision but I think it was a poor one. But I want to address the question more particularly, because Australia has seen a lower rate of giving, in financial terms, than countries to which we usually compare ourselves, like the UK, the US and Canada, and we've seen it for some time, and I think it's interesting to reflect on that. I't's been increasing, but still at slightly lower rate. And I don't know whether that's got something to do with the fact that we're very highly leveraged. We've got significant household debts because of much higher house prices. But you know, it's worth examining that. What we do do though, better than most other countries is volunteer, as Greg said. Our giving rates are a little bit lower than average in the OECD. Our volunteer rates that in-kind contribution are substantially higher than OECD average and they have been rising very significantly for many years. I think the last time I looked it was about 700 million unpaid hours of volunteering are performed by Australian adults, not to mention what children do as well. I mean, that's worth a very substantial amount and is utterly critical to the ability of a lot of church and charitable organizations to keep functioning. So, I think we also need to be holistic in thinking about giving, not just about financial giving, but also the sort of in-kind volunteering, that's a much more settled part of Australian culture, I think.  


Definitions:

brunt:
the main force or effect of something such as a blow or criticism;

leverage:
1. use (something) to maximum advantage; 

Sunday, July 26, 2015

mean & live within your means

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Greg Hunt: [live within your means; mean]  It's the second, it's to live within your means, so if you are borrowing to give money away ...

Definitions:

mean:
1. available resources, especially money.
2. considerable financial resources; riches; "a man of means"

live within/beyond your means:
to have a way of life in which you spend less/more money than you earn.

Saturday, July 25, 2015

gross domestic product & foreshadow

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Peter Singer: [gross domestic product; foreshadow;] But Greg, why can we not give more. In fact we're giving less and less when the United Kingdom which is surely not richer country than Australia has now met the United Nations target of 0.7% of gross domestic product and with the foreshadow aid cuts, we are going to get down to what 0.23% or something, I mean, we'll be about a third of what the UK is giving on per capita basis. 

Definitions:

gross domestic product: GDP:
the total value of all goods and services produced within a country in a year, minus net income from investments in other countries;

foreshadow:
to indicate or suggest something, usually something unpleasant, that is going to happen

Thursday, July 23, 2015

decent & macro

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Greg Hunt: [decent] Look, it's very powerful and just to go to the original questioner, there are many ways that people give, and I would say this that we actually have, I think, a very good and decent society. We had, this morning, just in my own electorate on the Mornington Peninsula, a senior's forum and we had a lot of people who came in and some of the presenters were from the community, talking about things such as the Rosebud Police Senior Citizen Registerwhere you have volunteers who are working with senior citizen, so some give money, some give time, some give mentoring, and a surprising amount of society are involved in that, we had, as one of our speakers, today, Pat Farmer who ran from the north pole to the south pole, an amazing Australian, and he gave up a year of his life, he raised extraordinary sum for clean water through the Red Cross, and just the sense of respect that that group had for him, but also others in the local community, so the answer is giving is important but there are many ways to give and a surprising number of Australians do that, but we can all always do more.

Tony Jones: [macro] Yeah, that's at the personal level, what about at the macro level with governments, I mean, could effective altruism be a way to distribute Australian aid, for example?

Definitions:

decent:
1. of a good enough standard or quality
2. acceptable to people in a particular situation;
...

macro:
large scale; overall;

aid worker & suck

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Peter Singer: [aid worker; suck; alongside;] Well, that's right and that surprises people, but I've had a student decide to do that, the Princeton student called Matt Wagger who went into Wall Street not because he wanted to earn a lot of money for himself, but because he realised that the more money you earn the more money you have to give away, and he's been giving away half of his income each year, it's a 6 figure sum that he's giving to effective charities. And he thinks he is doing more good that way than he would if he were to, say, become an aid worker, because there are plenty of people who want to be aid-workers and he would just be taking a job that somebody else probably almost as good as him would have got, but there aren't plenty of people going to Wall Street in order to give away half of their salary and that can lead to organizations employing new positions altogether. So, I think if you've got the right character and the right ability to do that and not be sucked into the temptation of saying: now I'm working alongside people with big apartments and driving Porsches and so on, so I've got to do that, if you can stick with it I think it's a great thing to do

Definitions:

aid worker:
somebody who works for an aid agency either as an employee or volunteer;

suck:
1. to pull sb/sth with great force in a particular direction; 
...

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

presumably & trachoma

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Peter Singer: [head for; presumably; trachoma] Right. Well, Toby Ord actually is an Australian, since we're here in Australia, though he is now working in Oxford. Toby Ord strated an organization called giving what we can in Oxford, because he realised that - he was just heading for an academic career, but he realised that he could live on less than he was going to earn. He was actually graduate student at that time and was living on a quite modest amount, but he felt fine with that, so he tried to work out how much good he could do if he kept living at a modest level and giving away the rest that he was likely to earn as he dvanced in his academic career, presumably to a professor at the end. And he worked out that if he took the all that money over his lifetime and gave it to an organization that was preventing people from going blind from a condition called trachoma which is the most common cause of preventable blindness. He could save the sight of 80,000 people, and he thought that is really amazing. You know, a huge football stadium full of people who would be able to see because of what one person and not Bill Gates, not particularly wealthy person had been able to give. So he started this organization to put that message out there and to get people to think about living more ethically and encourage other people to pledge to do something of that sort.

Definitions:

presumably:
used to say that you think that sth is probably true;

trachoma:
a contagious bacterial eye disease in which scar tissue forms inside the eyelid, eventually causing it to curve inwards and the eyelashes to scrape the eye and cause infection

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

consumer goods & altruism

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Peter Singer: [sliding scale; hedonic; treadmill; consumer goods; cause;] Yeah, thank you, that's a very good question. The third is a little bit of an exaggeration, I mean, I am not suggesting everyone, that's - I've suggested in a book The Life you can save and in the organization with that name that there is a sliding scale depending how much you earn and I think the higher levels of income, yes, a third seems reasonable, and the lower levels it would be too difficult. But your question is how we change this society and this culture. I think that a lot of people are actually looking for change. They are realizing that by simply looking for material success, consuming more spending more, you get on a hedonic treadmill, you have to keep working harder to maintain the same level of enjoyment at getting more consumer goods, bigger cars, or houses whatever it might be, and in fact, there is a lot of psychological research showing that if you are generous in contributing to causes that help others, if you think others more, you are more satisfied with your life. The people who do that are more fulfilled, rate their lives higher than people who don't. So, I am hoping that this knowledge will spread. I am trying to spread it in my own work and ...

Tony Jones: [altruism] You actually call it the effective altruism movement. And ...

Definitions:

consumer goods:
things you buy for personal or home use, such as food and clothing.

altruism:
a way of thinking or behaving that shows you care about other people and their interests more than you care about yourself


Monday, July 20, 2015

break into & sliding scale

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Alice Sexton: [break into] Peter you suggest that Australian should ideally be donating a third of their income to charity. How will we achieve change from the current culture where the focus is on living an individualistic lifestyle, we're earning more to spend more and it's harder than ever to break into the property market. 

Peter Singer: [sliding scale; hedonic; treadmill; consumer goods; cause;] Yeah, thank you, that's a very good question. The third is a little bit of an exaggeration, I mean, I am not suggesting everyone, that's - I've suggested in a book The Life you can save and in the organization with that name that there is a sliding scale depending how much you earn and I think the higher levels of income, yes, a third seems reasonable, and the lower levels it would be too difficult. But your question is how we change this society and this culture. I think that a lot of people are actually looking for change. They are realizing that by simply looking for material success, consuming more spending more, you get on a hedonic treadmill, you have to keep working harder to maintain the same level of enjoyment at getting more consumer goods, bigger cars, or houses whatever it might be, and in fact, there is a lot of psychological research showing that if you are generous in contributing to causes that help others, if you think others more, you are more satisfied with your life. The people who do that are more fulfilled, rate their lives higher than people who don't. So, I am hoping that this knowledge will spread. I am trying to spread it in my own work and ...

Definitions:

break into:
1. to begin an act or activity suddenly;
2. to begin working in a profession or field, often after having tried to do so for some time without success

sliding scale:
a system in which the rate at which sth is paid varies according to particular conditions;

Sunday, July 19, 2015

where possible & individualistic

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Greg Hunt: [tasteless; where possible; maturely;  ] No, actually I wasn't looking to walk into this space, but anyway. No. There is a point of agreement with Mark here, and that is that anything which in any way focuses on the victim is inevitably going to be tasteless and almost certainly destructive. I'm not a great believer in censorship. I think we have the laws which should be allowing free speech where possible. But then there are  social conventions,and it is the distinguish between the two. that's important here. As a general principle, I think we can deal with these topics maturely, and I think that's the real development in society in the last, you know, decade or more we can deal with suicide and sexual assault and mental illness in a way which we did not. So, that's, I think, the primary place to start in most of these things.

Alice Sexton: [break into] Peter you suggest that Australian should ideally be donating a third of their income to charity. How will we achieve change from the current culture where the focus is on living an individualistic lifestyle, we're earning more to spend more and it's harder than ever to break into the property market. 

Definitions:

where possible:
when or where you have an opportunity to do something;

individualistic:
believing that what individual people want is more important than what society or the government wants

Saturday, July 18, 2015

tasteless & censorship

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Greg Hunt: [tasteless; where possible; maturely;  ] No, actually I wasn't looking to walk into this space, but anyway. No. There is a point of agreement with Mark here, and that is that anything which in any way focuses on the victim is inevitably going to be tasteless and almost certainly destructive. I'm not a great believer in censorship. I think we have the laws which should be allowing free speech where possible. But then there are  social conventions,and it is the distinguish between the two. that's important here. As a general principle, I think we can deal with these topics maturely, and I think that's the real development in society in the last, you know, decade or more we can deal with suicide and sexual assault and mental illness in a way which we did not. So, that's, I think, the primary place to start in most of these things.

Definitions:

tasteless:
1. offensive and not appropriate;
2. showing a lack of the ability to choose things that people recognize as attractive and of good quality

censorship:
the act or policy of censoring books, etc


Friday, July 17, 2015

on a regular basis & cringe-worthy

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Tony Jones: [on a regular basis] Actually Bill shorten seems to fail on a regular basis.

Mark Butler: [cringeworthy] ... in spite of it often being incredibly uncomfortable and cringe-worthy sometimes. It is ...

Definitions:

on a regular basis:
It means "regularly", repeatedly over a set period of time; often;

cringeworthy:
causing feelings of embarrassment or awkwardness.

Thursday, July 16, 2015

at the expense of & adjudicate

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Mark Butler:  [subversion; at the expense of; adjudicate;] ... comedy is one of the most important weapons against the abuse of power we've ever had, people who abuse power hate nothing more than being laughed at and good jokes directed at people who abuse their power, I think, are an  incredibly important form of subversion. As Adrienne said, though, it's a very fine and important line not to cross over targeting things at the abuser into just getting a cheap laugh, or even worse making a joke at the expense of victims  and I think that's really the question that has been asked. There is no one less qualified to determine  and adjudicate where the line is  than politicians, I'm happy to say, but, you know, in the area of comedy I think I am ...

Definitions:

at the expense of:
 to the detriment of someone or something; to the harm of someone or something. 

adjudicate:
to make an official decision about a problem or dispute

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

risque & subversion

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Amanda Vanstone: [but still; genre; penance; sex outside of marriage; risque] First time I have been called that, but still. Look, in any genre of comedy, you can find people who do it badly and have bad taste as you said - not the sort of comedic response you want - but comedy can bring things out of the dark. You know, there used be a joke about a young priest who was taking confession and he forgot what the penance was for sex outside of marriage, so he heard alter boys going past and, you know, pulled the curtain back and said: Hey, what does Father O'Reilly give for sex and the kids said Mars Bar and a can of coke. You know, that was considered at the time to be a little be risque, but you know what ...

Mark Butler:  [subversion; at the expense of; adjudicate;] ... comedy is one of the most important weapons against the abuse of power we've ever had, people who abuse power hate nothing more than being laughed at and good jokes directed at people who abuse their power, I think, are an  incredibly important form of subversion. As Adrienne said, though, it's a very fine and important line not to cross over targeting things at the abuser into just getting a cheap laugh, or even worse making a joke at the expense of victims  and I think that's really the question that has been asked. There is no one less qualified to determine  and adjudicate where the line is  than politicians, I'm happy to say, but, you know, in the area of comedy I think I am ...


Definitions:

risque:
 like to offend some people, especially by referring to sex;

subversion:
an action, plan, or activity intended to undermine or overthrow a government or other institution

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

genre & penance

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Amanda Vanstone: [but still; genre; penance; sex outside of marriage; risque] First time I have been called that, but still. Look, in any genre of comedy, you can find people who do it badly and have bad taste as you said - not the sort of comedic response you want - but comedy can bring things out of the dark. You know, there used be a joke about a young priest who was taking confession and he forgot what the penance was for sex outside of marriage, so he heard alter boys going past and, you know, pulled the curtain back and said: Hey, what does Father O'Reilly give for sex and the kids said Mars Bar and a can of coke. You know, that was considered at the time to be a little be risque, but you know what ...


Definitions:

genre:
a particular type or style of literature, art, film or music that you can recognize because of its special features

penance:
an act that you give yourself to do, or that a priest gives you to do in order to show that you are sorry for sth you have done wrong.

Sunday, July 12, 2015

gal & but still

Quotations:

Adrienne Truscott: [outfit;gin and tonics;approachable; gal;] In heels. I don't wear pants in my show. I wear a jacket and shoes. I'm not ridiculous, I wouldn't go out on stage barefoot. But I obviously, as a performer, I am taking this notion of wearing an 'asking for it' outfit to what I think is both a comedic extreme, because it looks really silly, as well as taking that logic that somehow what a woman is wearing affects how she is treated and possibly invites violent assault. So, I am in a room. I drink gin and tonics during my show. I am a very approachable and friendly gal. And I am not wearing pants and there's not much more of 'asking for it' outfit you can wear than that and I don't get rape every night in my show. So, to me, that act only happens when somebody is willing to rape you. 

Amanda Vanstone: [but still; genre; penance; sex outside of marriage; risque] First time I have been called that, but still. Look, in any genre of comedy, you can find people who do it badly and have bad taste as you said - not the sort of comedic response you want - but comedy can bring things out of the dark. You know, there used be a joke about a young priest who was taking confession and he forgot what the penance was for sex outside of marriage, so he heard alter boys going past and, you know, pulled the curtain back and said: Hey, what does Father O'Reilly give for sex and the kids said Mars Bar and a can of coke. You know, that was considered at the time to be a little be risque, but you know what ...


Definitions:

gal:
a girl or woman.

but still:
but still, even so, it was ...

tonic & approachable

Quotations:

Adrienne Truscott: [outfit;gin and tonics;approachable; gal;] In heels. I don't wear pants in my show. I wear a jacket and shoes. I'm not ridiculous, I wouldn't go out on stage barefoot. But I obviously, as a performer, I am taking this notion of wearing an 'asking for it' outfit to what I think is both a comedic extreme, because it looks really silly, as well as taking that logic that somehow what a woman is wearing affects how she is treated and possibly invites violent assault. So, I am in a room. I drink gin and tonics during my show. I am a very approachable and friendly gal. And I am not wearing pants and there's not much more of 'asking for it' outfit you can wear than that and I don't get rape every night in my show. So, to me, that act only happens when somebody is willing to rape you. 

Definitions:

tonic:
1. a clear fizzy drink (= with bubbles in it) with a slightly bitter taste, that is often mixed with a strong alcoholic drink, especially gin or vodka;

approachable:
1. friendly and easy to talk to;
...

Saturday, July 11, 2015

outfit & gin

Quotations:

Adrienne Truscott: [outfit;gin and tonics;approachable; gal;] In heels. I don't wear pants in my show. I wear a jacket and shoes. I'm not ridiculous, I wouldn't go out on stage barefoot. But I obviously, as a performer, I am taking this notion of wearing an 'asking for it' outfit to what I think is both a comedic extreme, because it looks really silly, as well as taking that logic that somehow what a woman is wearing affects how she is treated and possibly invites violent assault. So, I am in a room. I drink gin and tonics during my show. I am a very approachable and friendly gal. And I am not wearing pants and there's not much more of 'asking for it' outfit you can wear than that and I don't get rape every night in my show. So, to me, that act only happens when somebody is willing to rape you. 

Definitions:

outfit:
a set of clothes that you wear together, especially for a particular occasion or purpose;

gin:
an alcoholic drink made from grain and flavoured with juniper berries . Gin is usually drunk mixed with tonic water or fruit juice.

Thursday, July 9, 2015

titillate& buck's party

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Tony Jones: [titillate; buck's party;]  I've actually seen people suggest to you that you're putting yourself at risk in your performances. Because there are a number of single men in the audience who, as you put it, go to be titillated. You get buck's parties come along to the show.

Definitions:

titillate:
to excite or stimulate somebody pleasurably, usually in a mildly sexual way;

buck's party:
a bachelor party; a stag night;

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

light-heartedly & aftermath

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Adrienne Truscott: [light-heartedly; aftermath] Yeah, well, I mean, I think, like I said I think comedy is a really supple form to comment on the absurdities in life and comedians have always done that, or not always, frequently, and I think, you know, sometimes I think when you say the word rape and comedian in the same sentence, people have a very strong reaction because, of course, there's nothing funny about rape. So, the notion that you would take it light-heartedly is shocking. But satire is an incredibly useful tool and certainly I think that the ways that we talk about rape, the way that we talk about where women should or shouldn't walk in order to avoid it, the way we legislate women's bodies in the aftermath of a rape and what their choices are, that is all completely available to the wildest of satires.

Definitions:

light-heartedly:
1. funny and not intended to be serious;
2. happy and not worry about anything;

aftermath:
the consequences of an event, especially a disastrous one, or the period of time during which these consequences are felt

Tuesday, July 7, 2015

delve & gruesome

Quotations:

Adrienne: [censor; you would do well to do something; gist; punchline; land; supple; provocative; standpoint; edgy; taste; delve; in an effort; ]I think that, I'm certainly I fall on the side of not censoring expression whether it's in comedy or art or political speech. I think if you are a male comedian making a joke about rape, it would do you well to think really hard about why you are making that joke and why you want to make it and what the gist of it is, perhaps where the punchline lands, if the punchline lands on the victim of the act or the perpetrator, and so it's my belief that it's most likely that a woman might be able to use comedy in a more supple fashion to make a joke about gender and rape, or one a joke that might interest me more. But I have heard intelligent comedians makes joke about gender and even rape that I've found to be provocative and push a conversation forward from a comedic standpoint. I think the notion that you're being edgy simply because you talked about it and were willing to risk offending an audience member makes you, for my taste, not a terribly interesting comedian. And I think there is a little bit of climate in comedy at the moment, I think, where people are delving into very heated subjects like suicide and race and rape,in an effort to seem really edgy and daring ...

Tony Jones: [gruesome] Can you explain how you manage to do it because, I mean, for those who haven't seen your show, I mean, you break a lot of boundaries, you break taboos, you perform half-naked to start with, I mean these are things which would shock most people in the audience even to hear it, tell us why you chose to do it in that way and how you can actually make, in a way, humour out of such a gruesome subject. 

Definitions:

delve:
1. to investigate or research something thoroughly in order to obtain information;
...

gruesome:
very unpleasant and filling you with horror, usually because it is connected with death or injury;

edgy & taste

Quotations:

Adrienne: [censor; you would do well to do something; gist; punchline; land; supple; provocative; standpoint; edgy; taste; delve; in an effort; ]I think that, I'm certainly I fall on the side of not censoring expression whether it's in comedy or art or political speech. I think if you are a male comedian making a joke about rape, it would do you well to think really hard about why you are making that joke and why you want to make it and what the gist of it is, perhaps where the punchline lands, if the punchline lands on the victim of the act or the perpetrator, and so it's my belief that it's most likely that a woman might be able to use comedy in a more supple fashion to make a joke about gender and rape, or one a joke that might interest me more. But I have heard intelligent comedians makes joke about gender and even rape that I've found to be provocative and push a conversation forward from a comedic standpoint. I think the notion that you're being edgy simply because you talked about it and were willing to risk offending an audience member makes you, for my taste, not a terribly interesting comedian. And I think there is a little bit of climate in comedy at the moment, I think, where people are delving into very heated subjects like suicide and race and rape,in an effort to seem really edgy and daring ...


Definitions:

edgy:
1. music, movies, books, etc. that are edgy are strange in a way that is interesting or exciting;
2. ...

taste:
1. what a person likes or prefers;
...


Sunday, July 5, 2015

supple & provocative

Quotations:

Adrienne: [censor; you would do well to do something; gist; punchline; land; supple; provocative; standpoint; edgy; taste; delve; in an effort; ]I think that, I'm certainly I fall on the side of not censoring expression whether it's in comedy or art or political speech. I think if you are a male comedian making a joke about rape, it would do you well to think really hard about why you are making that joke and why you want to make it and what the gist of it is, perhaps where the punchline lands, if the punchline lands on the victim of the act or the perpetrator, and so it's my belief that it's most likely that a woman might be able to use comedy in a more supple fashion to make a joke about gender and rape, or one a joke that might interest me more. But I have heard intelligent comedians makes joke about gender and even rape that I've found to be provocative and push a conversation forward from a comedic standpoint. I think the notion that you're being edgy simply because you talked about it and were willing to risk offending an audience member makes you, for my taste, not a terribly interesting comedian. And I think there is a little bit of climate in comedy at the moment, I think, where people are delving into very heated subjects like suicide and race and rape,in an effort to seem really edgy and daring ...


Definitions:

supple:
1. adaptable and responsive in grappling with problems or dealing with new challenges
2. flexible and elastic
3. excessively compliant and willing to agree
...

provocative:
1. intended to make people angry or upset;
2. intended to make people argue about sth;
3. intended to make sb sexually excited.

Saturday, July 4, 2015

punchline & land on

Quotations:

Adrienne: [censor; you would do well to do something; gist; punchline; land; supple; provocative; standpoint; edgy; taste; delve; in an effort; ]I think that, I'm certainly I fall on the side of not censoring expression whether it's in comedy or art or political speech. I think if you are a male comedian making a joke about rape, it would do you well to think really hard about why you are making that joke and why you want to make it and what the gist of it is, perhaps where the punchline lands, if the punchline lands on the victim of the act or the perpetrator, and so it's my belief that it's most likely that a woman might be able to use comedy in a more supple fashion to make a joke about gender and rape, or one a joke that might interest me more. But I have heard intelligent comedians makes joke about gender and even rape that I've found to be provocative and push a conversation forward from a comedic standpoint. I think the notion that you're being edgy simply because you talked about it and were willing to risk offending an audience member makes you, for my taste, not a terribly interesting comedian. And I think there is a little bit of climate in comedy at the moment, I think, where people are delving into very heated subjects like suicide and race and rape,in an effort to seem really edgy and daring ...


Definitions:

punchline:
the last few words of a joke that make it funny

land on:
to reprimand; criticize;e

Friday, July 3, 2015

would do well to & gist

Quotations:

Adrienne: [censor; you would do well to do something; gist; punchline; land; supple; provocative; standpoint; edgy; taste; delve; in an effort; ]I think that, I'm certainly I fall on the side of not censoring expression whether it's in comedy or art or political speech. I think if you are a male comedian making a joke about rape, it would do you well to think really hard about why you are making that joke and why you want to make it and what the gist of it is, perhaps where the punchline lands, if the punchline lands on the victim of the act or the perpetrator, and so it's my belief that it's most likely that a woman might be able to use comedy in a more supple fashion to make a joke about gender and rape, or one a joke that might interest me more. But I have heard intelligent comedians makes joke about gender and even rape that I've found to be provocative and push a conversation forward from a comedic standpoint. I think the notion that you're being edgy simply because you talked about it and were willing to risk offending an audience member makes you, for my taste, not a terribly interesting comedian. And I think there is a little bit of climate in comedy at the moment, I think, where people are delving into very heated subjects like suicide and race and rape,in an effort to seem really edgy and daring ...


Definitions:

would do well to:
 If you say that someone would do well to do something, you mean that you advise or recommend that they do it.

gist:
the main or general meaning of a piece of writing, a speech or a conversation.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

stage & censor

Quotations:

Christen Daly: [stage]  My question is for Adrienne, a female audience member recently staged to protest against comedian Ray Badran, because of his joke: "Gay people can make jokes about being gay, black people can make jokes about being black, while I can make jokes about rape. The intent of the joke was to express how people are often judged by their appearances and first impressions, do you believe there is a room for male comedians to joke about their experiences, specifically those experiences relating to the gender without exploiting the power the gender may afford them.


Adrienne: [censor; you would do well to do something; gist; punchline; land; supple; provocative; standpoint; edgy; taste; delve; in an effort; ]I think that, I'm certainly I fall on the side of not censoring expression whether it's in comedy or art or political speech. I think if you are a male comedian making a joke about rape, it would do you well to think really hard about why you are making that joke and why you want to make it and what the gist of it is, perhaps where the punchline lands, if the punchline lands on the victim of the act or the perpetrator, and so it's my belief that it's most likely that a woman might be able to use comedy in a more supple fashion to make a joke about gender and rape, or one a joke that might interest me more. But I have heard intelligent comedians makes joke about gender and even rape that I've found to be provocative and push a conversation forward from a comedic standpoint. I think the notion that you're being edgy simply because you talked about it and were willing to risk offending an audience member makes you, for my taste, not a terribly interesting comedian. And I think there is a little bit of climate in comedy at the moment, I think, where people are delving into very heated subjects like suicide and race and rape,in an effort to seem really edgy and daring ...


Definitions:

stage:
1. to organize or carry out something such as an event that will attract attention or publicity;
...

censor:
1. to suppress or control something that may offend or harm others;
...


Wednesday, July 1, 2015

well-intentioned & unanimity

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep14

Mark Butler: [subliminal; reclaim the night movement; movement; well-intentioned; rest with; ] Well, I'm not sure that takes us any further than asking women not to walk unescorted. I think it really is -- this language is important. I'm not sure I agree with Peter. This language is a much gentler version of the subliminal messages we send from the boxing question really. Back to the Reclaim the Night movements of the 1970s, women have legitimately said you should not use language that casts any blame for these sorts of  attacks on us exercising our freedom of movement, I think that is very very important. And I think the officials you've talked about were doing their job. They were well-intentioned, providing advice, particularly to young women who are, you know, becoming independent, to keep safe, but it's very important that we all use language, particularly public officials use language that make crystal clear that the blame for these attacks rests with criminal men, not with the women exercising their freedom of movement ,rests with criminal men, and I think that it is very important for public officials to keep in mind.

Greg Hunt: [unanimity] Look, I think the point is a very simple one with near unanimity here, and that is: the victim is never to blame and it's as simple as that. And that's something that has to be part of, not just public discourse, but also the private discourse around this country. So, as that sort of language, isn't part of the dialogue, but even more so it is not part of the way we think.


Definitions:

well-intentioned:
trying to help, but often making things worse.

unanimity:
complete agreement about sth among a group of people