Sunday, May 31, 2015

Nope & gridlock

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Greg Sheridan: [credibility; shambles; Nope; gridlock]  Well, two things, Tony, real briefly. One breaking promises hurts credibility, There is no doubt about that. Even if they're  the stupid promises, breaking them really hurts credibility. But let me make a characteristic foreign editor's at this point, right across the western world at the moment, there is a crisis of governance. Look at the shambles of Europe; look at the gridlock in American Congress. Some of the factors I outlined before means that the power of nope is much greater than the power of hope. The power of blocking minorities is the power of stopping things. And I think this is a civilizational challenge. And what we are experiencing in Australia is one vision of what's happening right across Western world.

Definitions:

Nope:
used to say no.

gridlock:
gridlock or deadlock or political stalemate refers to a situation when there is difficulty of passing laws in a legislature because the votes for and against a proposed law are evenly divided, or in which two legislative houses, or the executive branch and the legislature are controlled by different political parties, or otherwise cannot agree. 

credibility & shambles

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Greg Sheridan: [credibility; shambles; Nope; gridlock]  Well, two things, Tony, real briefly. One breaking promises hurts credibility, There is no doubt about that. Even if they're  the stupid promises, breaking them really hurts credibility. But let me make a characteristic foreign editor's at this point, right across the western world at the moment, there is a crisis of governance. Look at the shambles of Europe; look at the gridlock in American Congress. Some of the factors I outlined before means that the power of nope is much greater than the power of hope. The power of blocking minorities is the power of stopping things. And I think this is a civilizational challenge. And what we are experiencing in Australia is one vision of what's happening right across Western world.

Definitions:

credibility:
the quality that sb/sth has that makes people believe or trust them.

shambles:
a situation in which there is a lot of confusion.

Friday, May 29, 2015

sidestep & whereas

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Anne Greaves: [wriggle; squirm; obfuscate; side step] Every week, we watch the politicians on the panel wriggle, squirm, obfuscate, side step and avoid to questions that we ask them. Is it anyone wonder that confidence in the governance of our country is at all-time low. It's therefore with scepticism that ask Mr Turnbull if he can tell us what he honestly thinks is needed to restore the faith of Australians in the political party process to stop the negativity of oppositional politics and govern for the future to rebuild the nation's self-belief.


Lisa Wilkinson: [whereas] I think the government has got to start communicating with itself. I think we are seeing that there is a real problem with the left hand knowing what the right hand is doing. Even down to, just in this last week, we heard Prime Minister just say that he is going to go softly, softly on what he puts through parliament, hoping that it's going to get through the senate, whereas Joe Hockey said that he was going to stick with the existing budget that he had, so there is a disconnect there between two of the most senior in the government. So I think - I think miscommunication is a real problem within the existing government. 

Definitions:

sidestep:
to avoid answering a question or dealing with a problem;

whereas:
1. used to compare or contrast two facts ...
2. used at the beginning of a sentence in an official document to mean 'because of the fact that…'

Thursday, May 28, 2015

squirm & obfuscate

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Anne Greaves: [wriggle; squirm; obfuscate; side step] Every week, we watch the politicians on the panel wriggle, squirm, obfuscate, side step and avoid to questions that we ask them. Is it anyone wonder that confidence in the governance of our country is at all-time low. It's therefore with scepticism that ask Mr Turnbull if he can tell us what he honestly thinks is needed to restore the faith of Australians in the political party process to stop the negativity of oppositional politics and govern for the future to rebuild the nation's self-belief.

Definitions:

squirm:
1. to wriggle the body, especially because of discomfort or in an attempt to break free from being held;
2. to feel very uncomfortable, especially because of shame, embarrassment, or revulsion;

obfuscate:
to make sth less clear and more difficult to understand, usually deliberately.



Wednesday, May 27, 2015

in place & loophole

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Tony Jones: [put in place] ... and no doubt, you will want to know what revenue raising measures are going to put in place to pay for your policies, do you have any idea at this stage? 

Catherine King: [slug; loophole] There are certainly- there is certainly work done as - and you would have seen for the shadow Treasurer last Q&A. You know, we know there are challenges in the budget. We know there are challenges in the budget. What we are saying is the measures that you have put in place in your last budget are fundamentally unfair. You know, to slug pensioners while you were allowing multinationals tax loopholes. I mean, really. Like, you know that's not where we want to go. We are working our way through those and of course we have plenty to say in the course of the year. 

Definitions:

in place:
in the correct position, ready for sth;

loophole:
1. a small mistake or omission in a rule or law that allows it to be circumvented
...

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

unfounded & thingy

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Malcolm Turnbull: [unfounded;] I did that because I wanted to say we're responsible. We don't agree with that item in yours which would leave a hole, so therefore we've got another way of getting the revenue. You have never done that. You've never done that. It's a - this is sort of unfounded empathy we are getting from you.

Malcolm Turnbull: [thingy] That old {our} medical research thingy. That's not important, you know. 

Definitions:

unfounded:
no based on reason or fact;

thingy: (thingummy)
used to refer to a person or thing whose name you do not know or have forgotten, or which you do not want to mention;

Monday, May 25, 2015

slug & excise

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Malcolm Turnbull: [cutback; slug; excise; ] What you - how you are going to address the fact that we have this growing deficit. This, you know, growing debt as a consequence, and you haven't provided us any answers, look, I mean, when I was opposition leader back in 2009, we had - we opposed one of your measures and it related to health that was a cutback on the Medicare, the private health insurance rebate, and we opposed that, and I proposed or we proposed an alternative measure, actually I think it was slugging the poor old smokers with extra-cigarette excise tax us, tobacco excise ..

Definitions:

slug:
1. to charge somebody a price that is unfairly high;
2. to strike somebody or something very hard with the fist or a bat;
...

excise:
1. a government tax on some goods made, sold or used within a country;
...

Sunday, May 24, 2015

take sth on the chin & cutback

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Malcolm Turnbull: [take sth on the chin] I take all that on the chin. 

Malcolm Turnbull: [cutback; slug; excise; ] What you - how you are going to address the fact that we have this growing deficit. This, you know, growing debt as a consequence, and you haven't provided us any answers, look, I mean, when I was opposition leader back in 2009, we had - we opposed one of your measures and it related to health that was a cutback on the Medicare, the private health insurance rebate, and we opposed that, and I proposed or we proposed an alternative measure, actually I think it was slugging the poor old smokers with extra-cigarette excise tax us, tobacco excise ..

Definitions:

take sth on the chin:
to accept a difficult or unpleasant situation without complaining, trying to make excuses, etc.

cutback:
a reduction in sth.

Saturday, May 23, 2015

cop & substantial

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Catherine King: [cop; substantial;] What we did in government was fine substantial savings in health. Private health insurance rebate means testing was not an easy thing to do. It was something these guys opposed and say that they are going to reverse when they get the opportunity to do so. That was a  big area of savings, Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme reform, also we copped a lot of pressure from the pharmacists when we did that. Have seen substantial savings there. There are lots of ideas within health around what you might do. But what people tell you very clearly you do not do is you do not try and make it harder for people to go and see the cheapest part of the system which is our general practitioners. That is not a smile - smart health policy reform. And I think one of the problems that government has had is you haven't actually had health policy framework to actually explain what you are trying to do, what it is you are trying to achieve across the entire commonwealth expenditure for health, not just the Medicare benefit schedule and one component of it. We are in the process of working all of that up. You should - your government has been, the last eighteen months, at war with the doctors, at war with patients, and has had no health policy as a result of that, and is really in the point where it's now going back and saying "we'll consult". What have you been doing for the last 18 months really?

Definitions:

cop:
1. to receive or suffer sth unpleasant;
...

substantial:
1. large in amount, value or importance;
...

Friday, May 22, 2015

surplus & pharmaceutical

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Catherine King: [in essence; surplus;] Yeah, well, I guess the first thing I'd say is that, you know, the Liberal Party before the election said, you know, the impossible in essence. They said they weren't going to put up taxes, they weren't going to cut expenditure on health or education and they were going to have surplus. Now, you can't have all of those things. That's reality. So, that's ...

Catherine King: [pharmaceutical] So, I think the first thing to say is we have actually passed a number of budget measures, including in health, that have actually been savings measures, so I will say that including we supported which was not a budget measure, but which was something that we thought was a good idea to do in government, which was the Pharmaceutical benefit scheme reform. So there's  been $20 worth of savings that we have actually passed. Now I have spent the last 18 months holding policy forms across the country on primary care, on prevention, on health financing, all of those things to develop our policies and we will certainly announce those in the course of the year. We have said that very clearly we will do so but, again, it seems extraordinary to me when it comes to health policy in particular. There is not a health economist in the country that would tell you what the government has done is the right thing when it comes to health policy; not a health economist in the country. There are ... 

Definitions:

surplus:
1. the amount by which the amount of money received is greater than the amount of money spent;
2. an amount that is extra or more than you need;

pharmaceutical:
connected with making and selling drugs and medicines;

Thursday, May 21, 2015

evermore & in essence

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Greg Sheridan: [immaculate; shred of; bizarre; gyration; for evermore; ] Well, you know, at times I think the government has made the economic debate, needlessly complex. It's been like Duns Scotus explaining the immaculate conception or something, but, I would say to you there is, to use the old Marxist terms there are subjective problems and objective problems. Malcolm has outlined the subjective problems. One, I think, of the objective problems is we are becoming a very difficult country to govern. You know, these Greens senators, when they oppose indexing excise on petrol, that would be a core Green belief everywhere in the world, they oppose it because they want to hurt Tony Abbott. These Palmer United Party senators, if you can find any shred of coherence to the bizarre gyrations. Now our Senate system guarantees you're going to have people like that in the senate more or less for evermore. As well as that you've got social media which means any party in government is going to have the extreme elements of its base, much louder in dissatisfaction with not going far enough in whatever the direction is, which is going to hurt it with the centre. Now I thought the failures the Rudd and Gillard governments indicated the failure in the culture of the Labor Party. I'm beginning to worry that we are losing the culture of governing ourselves well and, I think that is a bit problem.

Catherine King: [in essence; surplus;] Yeah, well, I guess the first thing I'd say is that, you know, the Liberal Party before the election said, you know, the impossible in essence. They said they weren't going to put up taxes, they weren't going to cut expenditure on health or education and they were going to have surplus. Now, you can't have all of those things. That's reality. So, that's ...


Definitions:

evermore:
always; forever; from now until to the end of time or the end of somebody's life.

in essence:
1. fundamentally or intrinsically;
2. used for emphasizing what is the most important feature of something;

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

bizarre & gyration

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Greg Sheridan: [immaculate; shred of; bizarre; gyration; for evermore; ] Well, you know, at times I think the government has made the economic debate, needlessly complex. It's been like Duns Scotus explaining the immaculate conception or something, but, I would say to you there is, to use the old Marxist terms there are subjective problems and objective problems. Malcolm has outlined the subjective problems. One, I think, of the objective problems is we are becoming a very difficult country to govern. You know, these Greens senators, when they oppose indexing excise on petrol, that would be a core Green belief everywhere in the world, they oppose it because they want to hurt Tony Abbott. These Palmer United Party senators, if you can find any shred of coherence to the bizarre gyrations. Now our Senate system guarantees you're going to have people like that in the senate more or less for evermore. As well as that you've got social media which means any party in government is going to have the extreme elements of its base, much louder in dissatisfaction with not going far enough in whatever the direction is, which is going to hurt it with the centre. Now I thought the failures the Rudd and Gillard governments indicated the failure in the culture of the Labor Party. I'm beginning to worry that we are losing the culture of governing ourselves well and, I think that is a bit problem.

Definitions:

bizarre:
very strange or unusual;

gyration:
1. movement in a circle around a fixed centre;
2. a spiral or coil-shaped thing or part

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

immaculate & shred of

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Greg Sheridan: [immaculate; shred of; bizarre; gyration; for evermore; ] Well, you know, at times I think the government has made the economic debate, needlessly complex. It's been like Duns Scotus explaining the immaculate conception or something, but, I would say to you there is, to use the old Marxist terms there are subjective problems and objective problems. Malcolm has outlined the subjective problems. One, I think, of the objective problems is we are becoming a very difficult country to govern. You know, these Greens senators, when they oppose indexing excise on petrol, that would be a core Green belief everywhere in the world, they oppose it because they want to hurt Tony Abbott. These Palmer United Party senators, if you can find any shred of coherence to the bizarre gyrations. Now our Senate system guarantees you're going to have people like that in the senate more or less for evermore. As well as that you've got social media which means any party in government is going to have the extreme elements of its base, much louder in dissatisfaction with not going far enough in whatever the direction is, which is going to hurt it with the centre. Now I thought the failures the Rudd and Gillard governments indicated the failure in the culture of the Labor Party. I'm beginning to worry that we are losing the culture of governing ourselves well and, I think that is a bit problem.

Definitions:

immaculate:
1. showing faultless perfection;
2. so clean and tidy that there is no dirt;

shred of:
a very small amount of something;

Monday, May 18, 2015

austerity & advocacy

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Malcolm Turnbull: [mea culpa; budgetary; lean; hair shirt; austerity] Well, it's a very good question and, let me say to you what we need to do is be - this is a bit of a mea culpa. We, as a government, have to do a better job at explaining the problem that we face. We do have a budgetary problem, you know we're spending more than we're receiving in revenue and we've set out how we'd address it and as I said earlier obviously, Labour doesn't like it. But they haven't put up their alternative. But let me say what the really - that is just a subset of the big question. The big question is this: How do we here in Australia maintain our standard of living, our high wage, generous social welfare net economy in a more competitive globalized world where we've got developing countries that are competing in a way that they couldn't do before, but Internet makes so many goods - so many industries and businesses trade boast and, the answer is: we have to be more productive; we have to be smarter; we have to be more innovative; we have to be more cost effective at every level and that's, you know, one of the reasons I'm addressing the digital transformation of Government. It's not just to save some money in government. If you make the government more efficient. That's about a third of the economy - you can make - that will then influence the rest of the economy. We have to  - everything we do has to be designed to ensure that our prosperity is secure and that is by being more productive, more innovative, smarter, faster, leaner, all of those things and that's - and the reason for that is not a hair shirt. It's because that's how we ensure that our kids will have good jobs, our grandkids will have good jobs, that is our future. It's a really competitive world. More competition, but you know something, so many more opportunities, but they'll only be attainable by us if we go for that growth that comes from productivity, competitiveness, innovation, it is - that is what this budget repairs things all about. It's not just about, you know, austerity. It's not just about paying off debt. It's about making us a stronger, healthier economy for a better future for all of us.

Malcolm Turnbull: [advocacy] I think the, you know, I think the fact we haven't been able to get a lot of this through means that mistakes have been made. You know, the great lawmaker Solon who wrote the first laws of Athens, the great legislator, we learnt about him at law school, he was asked, he said - they said, "Solon are these laws you've given Athens the best laws. And he said, "They are the best laws the Athenians will accept." And the fact is if you've got to get your laws through, if you've got to get the public to accept them, if you've got to get the Parliament to accept them. So, we just have to do a better job of advocacy 

Definitions:

austerity:
1. a situation when people do not have much money to spend because there are bad economic conditions;
2. the quality of being austere;
3. something that is part of an ausere way of life;

advocacy: 
the giving of public support to an idea, a course of action or a belief;

Sunday, May 17, 2015

lean & hair shirt

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Malcolm Turnbull: [mea culpa; budgetary; lean; hair shirt; austerity] Well, it's a very good question and, let me say to you what we need to do is be - this is a bit of a mea culpa. We, as a government, have to do a better job at explaining the problem that we face. We do have a budgetary problem, you know we're spending more than we're receiving in revenue and we've set out how we'd address it and as I said earlier obviously, Labour doesn't like it. But they haven't put up their alternative. But let me say what the really - that is just a subset of the big question. The big question is this: How do we here in Australia maintain our standard of living, our high wage, generous social welfare net economy in a more competitive globalized world where we've got developing countries that are competing in a way that they couldn't do before, but Internet makes so many goods - so many industries and businesses trade boast and, the answer is: we have to be more productive; we have to be smarter; we have to be more innovative; we have to be more cost effective at every level and that's, you know, one of the reasons I'm addressing the digital transformation of Government. It's not just to save some money in government. If you make the government more efficient. That's about a third of the economy - you can make - that will then influence the rest of the economy. We have to  - everything we do has to be designed to ensure that our prosperity is secure and that is by being more productive, more innovative, smarter, faster, leaner, all of those things and that's - and the reason for that is not a hair shirt. It's because that's how we ensure that our kids will have good jobs, our grandkids will have good jobs, that is our future. It's a really competitive world. More competition, but you know something, so many more opportunities, but they'll only be attainable by us if we go for that growth that comes from productivity, competitiveness, innovation, it is - that is what this budget repairs things all about. It's not just about, you know, austerity. It's not just about paying off debt. It's about making us a stronger, healthier economy for a better future for all of us.

Definitions:

lean:
1. a lean business spends as little money and employs as few workers as possible so that it will make a good profit;
2. not using any more resources than necessary;

hair shirt:
1. a shirt made from a harsh scratchy haircloth that was once worn next to the skin by religious people as a form of self-imposed punishment
2. a self-imposed punishment in the form of private suffering
3. a shirt made of very rough cloth that some religious people wore in the past to punish themselves for things that they had done wrong

Saturday, May 16, 2015

mea culpa & budgetary

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Malcolm Turnbull: [mea culpa; budgetary; lean; hair shirt; austerity] Well, it's a very good question and, let me say to you what we need to do is be - this is a bit of a mea culpa. We, as a government, have to do a better job at explaining the problem that we face. We do have a budgetary problem, you know we're spending more than we're receiving in revenue and we've set out how we'd address it and as I said earlier obviously, Labour doesn't like it. But they haven't put up their alternative. But let me say what the really - that is just a subset of the big question. The big question is this: How do we here in Australia maintain our standard of living, our high wage, generous social welfare net economy in a more competitive globalized world where we've got developing countries that are competing in a way that they couldn't do before, but Internet makes so many goods - so many industries and businesses trade boast and, the answer is: we have to be more productive; we have to be smarter; we have to be more innovative; we have to be more cost effective at every level and that's, you know, one of the reasons I'm addressing the digital transformation of Government. It's not just to save some money in government. If you make the government more efficient. That's about a third of the economy - you can make - that will then influence the rest of the economy. We have to  - everything we do has to be designed to ensure that our prosperity is secure and that is by being more productive, more innovative, smarter, faster, leaner, all of those things and that's - and the reason for that is not a hair shirt. It's because that's how we ensure that our kids will have good jobs, our grandkids will have good jobs, that is our future. It's a really competitive world. More competition, but you know something, so many more opportunities, but they'll only be attainable by us if we go for that growth that comes from productivity, competitiveness, innovation, it is - that is what this budget repairs things all about. It's not just about, you know, austerity. It's not just about paying off debt. It's about making us a stronger, healthier economy for a better future for all of us.

Definitions:

mea culpa:
used when you are admitting that sth is your fault.

budgetary:
connected with a budget.

Friday, May 15, 2015

I beg to differ & too hard basket

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Jane Healy: [I beg to differ] sorry, I beg to differ.

Kate Golder: [too hard basket] My question is to the Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull. Minister, as a financial planner and a small business owner, I appreciate the importance of balancing a budget more than most. However, I've become increasingly dismayed over the past 18 months about the inability of the government to make public case for reform and concern that following Queensland election, tough budget measures would be placed in the too hard basket. In today's political climate, do you still believe budget repair and sensible economic reform is possible and if so, how can it be done without being voted out of government?

Definitions:

I beg to differ:
used for saying that you disagree with what someone has just said;

too hard basket:
The theoretical basket in which certain tasks are placed when they are deemed to be tedious or difficult. This can include office work and household chores. 

Thursday, May 14, 2015

blatantly & at some length/at length

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Tony Jones: [blatantly]  I'm going to - yes, I'd like to hear Malcolm on Gillian Triggs' report specifically, because we're running out of time and I want to hear - well, let me just put it as a question: do you share Tony Abbott's view that the children in detention report was a blatantly partisan politicized exercise?


Malcolm Turnbull: [at some length/at length; ] I'm not going to run a commentary on my colleagues. I just want to make this - this is a very - I want to make a very important point and I discussed this at some length with the Immigration Minister Peter Dutton today who has - who has been successful, as indeed was Scott Morrison, in getting kids out of detention. The reason children are in detention is obviously they are with their families - their mother and father typically. The reason why they are still there, in most cases, is because the mother and the children have been offered the opportunity to move out of detention, but do not want to leave the father in detention and the father is very - it may be, want to -  the authorities may wish to keep them in detention because of security issues and matters of that kind. So, that is - that is the, 

Definitions:

blatantly:
blatant:
done in an obvious and open way without caring if people are shocked.

at some length/at length:
for a long time and with a lot of detail.

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

undocumented & give rise to

Quotations

qanda_2015_ep03

Bryan Stevenson: [casualty; figure out; horrific; through the roof;  traumatise; undocumented; give rise to; replicate] Well, it troubles me but I think that, you know, this is not an uncommon debate. I mean, we've suffered in America from the politics of fear and anger where people posture politically around a big issue and that there are casualties in the middle and I think that's what's happened here. So, I do think that the challenge really has to be how do we protect children and it doesn't - from my perspective, and of course, I am not an Australian, it doesn't matter sort of who the political party is; it doesn't matter how we got here. We've got to figure out how we get where we are - from where we are to where we want to go and, no child should be under these conditions and circumstances. We've got some 3,000 children in adult jails and prisons and it's horrific. The suicide rate is through the roof. Kids are traumatised. They are scarred in ways that we are responsible for putting children in that situation. So, I think it's an immediate question of how to we get out of that. And there are some really good programs around the world. Refugee children in many societies are shielded from whatever the immigration policy is that is going to create suffering and abuse. So, we've got some programs in the States where we actually pull children; we put them in school; we provide them services; we offer them counselling; we facilitate relationships with their parents, even if they are undocumented and illegal. I think, you always in a just society have an obligation to protect children. In some ways it's society's first obligation; and all children are children. It doesn't matter whether they are born in another country; it doesn't matter if their parents came to the country illegal, well, they are children. If you don't protect children, you're really sowing the  seeds of a society that's at risk with itself. I don't think you should do nothing except quarrel about the politics that give rise to these policies. That is a recipe for sustaining the problem. I think in many ways, there are some immediate things that could be done and I think the Human Rights Commission report painted a picture that might have allowed that to happen. I do think it's a mistake to silence the reporting of these kinds of problems. Even if it's a little of out of date, because it's going to  - it can create a sort of resolve to  shield a country from these problems replicating themselves. 

Definitions:

undocumented:
not based on or supported by written evidence, or not have the legal document;

give rise to:
to cause sth to happen or exist;

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

go through the roof & traumatise

Quotations

qanda_2015_ep03

Bryan Stevenson: [casualty; figure out; horrific; through the roof;  traumatise; undocumented; give rise to; replicate] Well, it troubles me but I think that, you know, this is not an uncommon debate. I mean, we've suffered in America from the politics of fear and anger where people posture politically around a big issue and that there are casualties in the middle and I think that's what's happened here. So, I do think that the challenge really has to be how do we protect children and it doesn't - from my perspective, and of course, I am not an Australian, it doesn't matter sort of who the political party is; it doesn't matter how we got here. We've got to figure out how we get where we are - from where we are to where we want to go and, no child should be under these conditions and circumstances. We've got some 3,000 children in adult jails and prisons and it's horrific. The suicide rate is through the roof. Kids are traumatised. They are scarred in ways that we are responsible for putting children in that situation. So, I think it's an immediate question of how to we get out of that. And there are some really good programs around the world. Refugee children in many societies are shielded from whatever the immigration policy is that is going to create suffering and abuse. So, we've got some programs in the States where we actually pull children; we put them in school; we provide them services; we offer them counselling; we facilitate relationships with their parents, even if they are undocumented and illegal. I think, you always in a just society have an obligation to protect children. In some ways it's society's first obligation; and all children are children. It doesn't matter whether they are born in another country; it doesn't matter if their parents came to the country illegal, well, they are children. If you don't protect children, you're really sowing the  seeds of a society that's at risk with itself. I don't think you should do nothing except quarrel about the politics that give rise to these policies. That is a recipe for sustaining the problem. I think in many ways, there are some immediate things that could be done and I think the Human Rights Commission report painted a picture that might have allowed that to happen. I do think it's a mistake to silence the reporting of these kinds of problems. Even if it's a little of out of date, because it's going to  - it can create a sort of resolve to  shield a country from these problems replicating themselves. 

Definitions:

go through the roof:
1. to rise to an extremely high level;
...

traumatise:
to shock and upset sb very much, often making them unable to think or work normally;

Monday, May 11, 2015

sideline & horrific

Quotations

qanda_2015_ep03

Tony Jones: [sideline] Bryan, I'm just going to bring you in as an outsider. I sidelin

ed you for the most political leadership debate, because it didn't seem fair {you did not see in fair}. But, can you reflect on what you've seen here, children in detention, did you expect to find that in Australia.

Bryan Stevenson: [casualty; figure out; horrific; thought the roof;  traumatise; undocumented; give rise to; replicate] Well, it troubles me but I think that, you know, this is not an uncommon debate. I mean, we've suffered in America from the politics of fear and anger where people posture politically around a big issue and that there are casualties in the middle and I think that's what's happened here. So, I do think that the challenge really has to be how do we protect children and it doesn't - from my perspective, and of course, I am not an Australian, it doesn't matter sort of who the political party is; it doesn't matter how we got here. We've got to figure out how we get where we are - from where we are to where we want to go and, no child should be under these conditions and circumstances. We've got some 3,000 children in adult jails and prisons and it's horrific. The suicide rate is through the roof. Kids are traumatised. They are scarred in ways that we are responsible for putting children in that situation. So, I think it's an immediate question of how to we get out of that. And there are some really good programs around the world. Refugee children in many societies are shielded from whatever the immigration policy is that is going to create suffering and abuse. So, we've got some programs in the States where we actually pull children; we put them in school; we provide them services; we offer them counselling; we facilitate relationships with their parents, even if they are undocumented and illegal. I think, you always in a just society have an obligation to protect children. In some ways it's society's first obligation; and all children are children. It doesn't matter whether they are born in another country; it doesn't matter if their parents came to the country illegal, well, they are children. If you don't protect children, you're really sowing the  seeds of a society that's at risk with itself. I don't think you should do nothing except quarrel about the politics that give rise to these policies. That is a recipe for sustaining the problem. I think in many ways, there are some immediate things that could be done and I think the Human Rights Commission report painted a picture that might have allowed that to happen. I do think it's a mistake to silence the reporting of these kinds of problems. Even if it's a little of out of date, because it's going to  - it can create a sort of resolve to  shield a country from these problems replicating themselves. 

Definitions:

sideline:
1. to prevent someone from being involved in something that they would normally expect to be involved in;
2. to cause a player in a sport or game to be unable to play;

horrific:
1. very bad or unpleasant;
2. extremely bad and shocking or frightening;

Sunday, May 10, 2015

offshore & quibble

Quotations:

Tony Jones: [misapprehension; leave out; offshore; ]  No, no, there is a misapprehension here because Peter Dutton did release figures of {figure as} 192 children in detention today. But he left out {down} the children in detention offshore on Nauru.

Malcolm Turnbull: [quibble] But the bottom line, look, can I, listen, let's not quibble.

Definitions:

offshore:
based or registered in a foreign country;

quibble:
to argue or complain about a small matter or an unimportant detail

Saturday, May 9, 2015

misapprehension & leave out

Quotations:

Tony Jones: [misapprehension; leave out; offshore; ]  No, no, there is a misapprehension here because Peter Dutton did release figures of {figure as} 192 children in detention today. But he left out {down} the children in detention offshore on Nauru.

Definitions:

misapprehension:
a wrong idea about sth, or sth you believe to be true that is not true;

leave out:
to not include sb. or sth.

Friday, May 8, 2015

as of & up to date

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Malcolm Turnbull: [as of] It's out of date. but, there are 136 as of 12pm today. There are 192 as of last Thursday. There were 1992 at the peak under the Labor in 2013.

Malcolm Turnbull: [up to date] I'm sorry. This is the up to date information. 

Definitions:

as of:
used for saying that something will start to happen on a particular day, and will continue after that day;

up to date:
1. having or including the most recent information;
2. modern; fashionable

Thursday, May 7, 2015

let sb off the hook & irreparable

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Malcolm Turnbull: [let sb off the hook] But you keep on letting her off the hook, I mean, she is keen, she is very keen to answer.

Jane Healy: [irreparable] I'm a weekly visitor to Villawood Detention Centre and I know some of the children that have been mentioned in the recently-released report by the Australian Human Rights Commission.  I know an 8-year-old who attempted to suicide by eating rocks and screws and bolts from the tents that he lived in for 14 months on Nauru. I know a 14-year-old who attempted to hang herself. I would ask you personally to justify the irreparable damage that's been done to hundreds of children still in the detention. 

Definitions:

let sb off the hook:
to allow someone to escape from a difficult situation or to avoid doing something that they do not want to do;

irreparable:
too bad or too serous to repair or put right.

sort out & at some point

Quotations:

Malcolm Turnbull: [sort out; at some point; ] I suspect they have got more important things to worry about and I know I'm being a bit persistent about this. But if Catherine King and the Labor Party don't like our way of sorting out the budget mess we inherited, what is their alternative? I mean there is going to be an election in 18 months. They are ahead in the polls. You could be in government, Catherine. What - at some point you're going to have to say either there is no problem at all in which case people will think you are in the denial business in a very big way, or you're going to have to say, you know, we're going to fix the budget deficit by putting up taxes, or by cancelling these concessions, or by cutting that expenditure. I mean we've laid our program out on the table honestly and I grant you a lot of it has not been very popular, but what is yours...

Definitions:

sort out:
1. to deal effectively with a problem;
2. to separate something from the mixture it exists in, or from another group of things;
3. to think and come to a conclusion about a problem or difficulty;
...

at some point:
at some moment in time that is not made specific

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

in play & minefield

Quotations 

qanda_2015_ep03


Greg Sheridan: [in play] Well, look. You know, it's painful sometimes when you have known someone for very very long time, but as a journalist, you are paid to tell the truth and to write the truth and you're no good if you don't. It's quite clear the leadership is in play. It's quite clear the leadership is in play. I think Tony has a fifty-fifty chance of staying as a leader. I think if he were to lose the support definitively, it's very likely the Party would ask Malcolm Turnbull to take the leadership. That's what I think.

Malcolm Turnbull: [minefield] Well, I'll - you know, tempting, though it is, to venture into the minefield you are luring me into. I think I'll pass on that one. 

Definitions:

in play:
if a ball is in play, it is within the area where a game can be played.

minefield:
1. an area of land or water where mines have been hidden;
2. a situation that contains hidden dangers or difficulties;

Monday, May 4, 2015

choreography & sell someone short

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Lisa Wilkinson: [choreography]No, but everybody else in the party walked in with Tony Abbott. Was there any sort of choreography involved in that.

Lisa Wilkinson: [sell someone short] Well, we sold you short.

Definitions:

choreography:
the art of designing and arranging the steps and movements in dances, especially in ballet; the steps and movements in a particular ballet or show;

sell someone short:
to describe someone or something as less impressive than they really are;

candidacy & on your own

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Greg Sheridan: [candidacy] I'd like to declare my candidacy. If called upon, I'm willing to serve.

Lisa Wilkinson: [on your own] No, no, no. This certainly buys into Zack's question. I would love to know: why did you walk into that leadership spill all on your own.

Definitions:

candidacy:
the fact of being a candidate in an election;

on your own:
alone; by yourself;

Saturday, May 2, 2015

leadership spill & gaff

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Zack Solomon: [leadership spill; gaff; tender;] Following the recent leadership spill, Tony Abbott stated that "The good government starts today". Despite this we've experienced yet another week of unpopular decisions, captain's calls and gaffs. Does the panel believe that we are witnessing the end of Tony Abbott's tender as a leader of Liberal Party and Prime Minister and, if so, who do you believe to replace him? Is the person in this room?

Definitions:

leadership spill: 
In Australian politics, a leadership spill is a declaration that the leadership of a parliamentary party is vacant, and open for re-election;

gaff:
a pole with a hook on the end used to pull large fish out of the water;

Friday, May 1, 2015

practising & inundate

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Greg Sheridan: [crippling; replicate; shambles; practising; forbear; inundate; reconfigure ] Well, look, I don't have a strong view about it really one way or the other.  But I do think the government overall has been pursuing good policy. But it's very often pursued good policy with disastrous political consequences. On climate change, it is where the public wants to be. Rejecting an economy-crippling tax but taking the science seriously. The public suspects that the Prime Minister doesn't believe in the science, with no disrespect, Malcolm - it suspects that Malcolm doesn't believe in the policy and, this is kind of replicated, not between Malcolm and Tony but all across the government, it's been pursuing good policy but with disastrous political mismanagement. Now I think the Chief of Staff of Prime Minister's office has been running the political show. Politically it's been a shambles and the Chief of Staff has to take responsibility for it. Also, every single practising journalist, I was late to write this. I forbore from writing it but every single practising journalist has been inundated with tales of bad relationships between the Prime Minister's office right across the party and with the business community. Now, my worry for the Prime Minister who, I think, has the makings still of very fine Prime Minister is that even today he doesn't fully grasp the depth of the crisis which he and his government are in and one of the things you do in a crisis is make big changes, change the equations fundamentally and, getting the Chief of Staff to move on honorably. I certainly wouldn't sack her but moving her into a different role or something, would be part of recognizing and reconfiguring.

Definitions:

practising:
taking an active part in a particular religion, profession, etc. 

inundate: 
1. to give or send sb so many things that they cannot deal with them all;
2. to cover an area of land with a large amount of water;