Thursday, April 30, 2015

crippling & shambles

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Greg Sheridan: [crippling; replicate; shambles; practising; forbear; inundate; reconfigure ] Well, look, I don't have a strong view about it really one way or the other.  But I do think the government overall has been pursuing good policy. But it's very often pursued good policy with disastrous political consequences. On climate change, it is where the public wants to be. Rejecting an economy-crippling tax but taking the science seriously. The public suspects that the Prime Minister doesn't believe in the science, with no disrespect, Malcolm - it suspects that Malcolm doesn't believe in the policy and, this is kind of replicated, not between Malcolm and Tony but all across the government, it's been pursuing good policy but with disastrous political mismanagement. Now I think the Chief of Staff of Prime Minister's office has been running the political show. Politically it's been a shambles and the Chief of Staff has to take responsibility for it. Also, every single practising journalist, I was late to write this. I forbore from writing it but every single practising journalist has been inundated with tales of bad relationships between the Prime Minister's office right across the party and with the business community. Now, my worry for the Prime Minister who, I think, has the makings still of very fine Prime Minister is that even today he doesn't fully grasp the depth of the crisis which he and his government are in and one of the things you do in a crisis is make big changes, change the equations fundamentally and, getting the Chief of Staff to move on honorably. I certainly wouldn't sack her but moving her into a different role or something, would be part of recognizing and reconfiguring.

Definitions:

crippling:
causing severe damage or problems;

shambles:
1. a situation in which there is a lot of confusion;
2. a place which is dirty or untidy;

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

having said that & mismanagement

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Greg Sheridan: [bloke; having said that; conspicuous; mismanagement; ] Well, I didn't suggest she should be sacked. I think she should be moved out of her current position now. I think she should do so with full honour. She is a very good person. She's given her all to her job and to her leader. But, look, I think on the whole the Abbott government has tried to pursue good policy. Now, it's not a great secret that the Prime Minister is an old friend of mine and I think he is a terrific bloke. I think he is a really good human being. He is a first rate person and I'll go to my grave always defending that. Having said that, it has been a government of conspicuous political mismanagement with some exceptions obviously, but ... 

Definitions:

having said that:
used for adding an opinion that seems to be the opposite of what you have just said, although you think both are true;

mismanagement:
the process of managing something badly;

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

eke & bloke

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Catherine King: [legacy; eke; ] That was a very long yes, Malcolm, I thought then. Look, I think the real issue here is, you know, not what Tony Abbott has done this week, it's about the story about the budget and about the policies of the government, if, you know, the backbench or anyone thinks that the electorate is angry at them just because of Tony Abbott, you are deluding yourselves. Wherever you go people will tell you this is an unfair budget and the legacy of that is just eking its way through the government. So you can change Tony, Malcolm if you manage to get the spot at any point in time then it's going to be the policies that you've brought to the electorate. It's broken the promises. It really is what you're actually trying to sell. I think unfortunately where the Liberal Party is today is gone much further to the right than it has been previously. So, it's going to be very difficult for any new leader, particularly one who, may be a bit more progressive than the current leadership as a leadership group to actually move on things like climate change; to be able to move and look at it how do you actually make sure that you do protect those important institutions like Medicare. So, it's not really to me about Abbott. It's about what you are trying to do to the Australian people and they don't like it.

Greg Sheridan: [bloke; having said that; conspicuous; mismanagement; having said that; ] Well, I didn't suggest she should be sacked. I think she should be moved out of her current position now. I think she should do so with full honour. She is a very good person. She's given her all to her job and to her leader. But, look, I think on the whole the Abbott government has tried to pursue good policy. Now, it's not a great secret that the Prime Minister is an old friend of mine and I think he is a terrific bloke. I think he is a really good human being. He is a first rate person and I'll go to my grave always defending that. Having said that, it has been a government of conspicuous political mismanagement with some exceptions obviously, but ... 

Definitions:

eke:
make an amount or supply of something last longer by using or consuming it frugally;

bloke:
a man.

Monday, April 27, 2015

attorney general & chief whip

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Malcolm Turnbull: [re; notably; icon; Attorney-General; chief whip;  20:18] Let me just say this to you re Philip Ruddock. Philip Ruddock has been - is the father of the House. That means he has been in Parliament for over 40 years. He is the old longest serving member of House of representatives. He was an outstanding Minister in the Howard government, notably, as Immigration Minister and Attorney-General. He is one of the absolutely icons of the Liberal Party. He is well loved. He is well respected. He is esteemed by all of the Liberal Party right across the country and, look, Tony Abbott, as Philip said, is entitled to appoint and replace the chief whip as and when he wishes. That's his call. But I was - I have to say: I was very sad to see the announcement. I think, Tony, you know, it's Tony's call, right. So he is the one who has to explain it. But I just want to say that I think Philip Ruddock is a great Liberal, a great Parliamentarian and, it was a very sad day for all of us when we learnt that he had been - his service as chief whip had been terminated by the Prime Minister. 

Definitions:

attorney general:
the most senior legal officer in some countries or states, for example the UK or Canada, who advises the government or head of state on legal matters.

chief whip:
the most senior of a British political party's whips, whose role is to maintain party discipline and ensure that party members attend and vote at debates in the Houses of Parliament.

whip:
an official in a political party who is responsible for making sure that party members attend and vote in important government debates;

Sunday, April 26, 2015

re & icon

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Malcolm Turnbull: [re; notably; icon; Attorney-General; chief whip;  20:18] Let me just say this to you re Philip Ruddock. Philip Ruddock has been - is the father of the House. That means he has been in Parliament for over 40 years. He is the old longest serving member of House of representatives. He was an outstanding Minister in the Howard government, notably, as Immigration Minister and Attorney-General. He is one of the absolutely icons of the Liberal Party. He is well loved. He is well respected. He is esteemed by all of the Liberal Party right across the country and, look, Tony Abbott, as Philip said, is entitled to appoint and replace the chief whip as and when he wishes. That's his call. But I was - I have to say: I was very sad to see the announcement. I think, Tony, you know, it's Tony's call, right. So he is the one who has to explain it. But I just want to say that I think Philip Ruddock is a great Liberal, a great Parliamentarian and, it was a very sad day for all of us when we learnt that he had been - his service as chief whip had been terminated by the Prime Minister. 

Definitions:

re:
with reference to;

icon:
somebody or something widely and uncritically admired, especially somebody or something symbolizing a movement or field of activity


Saturday, April 25, 2015

be in touch with & backbench

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Lisa Wilkinson: [be in touch with; backbench] No, no ,no, but, but, you know, in terms of, you know, these own goals, the Prime Minister even, after he said good government, the other day he said that the question was not whether or not the Australian people thought that Prince Philip getting that award was appropriate, it's whether the award was appropriate. Now, these are the awards that the Prime Minister brought back from the dark ages, and the definition was that they had to be an Australian receiving the awards. Now, last time I looked, he was Greek-British. So, I just -  there's been so many things and you know, Tony Abbott only has to look in the mirror to see why he is having so many problems and on the issue of Philip Ruddock, I would have thought it's the Prime Minister's job to be in touch with this backbench, he couldn't have been reading a newspaper and he certainly couldn't have been talking to anybody in the backbench, because we all knew, everyone in this room, everyone watching, knew that you had real issues with the backbench and 40% of the people who said behind him don't want him there as a leader.

Definitions:

be in touch with:
to have regular communication with someone by telephone, letter etc. 

backbench:
one of the seats in the British Parliament where ordinary Members of Parliament sit. The leading members of each party sit on the front bench;

Friday, April 24, 2015

laundry list & knight

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Lisa Wilkinson: [own goals; laundry list; knighting; knighthood;] This came at the end of a week when the Prime Minister said that we were about to have good government and I think everybody had exactly the same reaction: so, what have we been having for the last 16 or 17 months. So, I think, I think the problem that Tony Abbott has now is that there are so many own goals, I mean, there is almost a laundry list now, from you - and having interviewed the Prime Minister many times, you know, most particularly also when he was opposition leader. He was very much - he was very effective opposition leader, because he was really good at tearing down the government. But one of the strongest messages that he would come back with, during our interviews, was 'Julia Gillard broke a promise. We will not break promises'. So we've got broken promises no cuts to pensions', 'no cuts to the ABC or SBS', 'no cuts to education', the submarine contracts look like that have been broken. It's just been one thing after the other and then we've had silly mistakes and silly decisions, like the knighting of Prince Philip. This is a man who has got 30 knighthoods and, I think, if you were to poll any number of Australians walking down George Street right now and you said : "Of all the royal family who do you think has the closest connection to the average Aussie." I think Prince Philip wouldn't even make the top 50 ...

Definitions:

laundry list:
a long list of people or things;

knight:
1. if someone in the U.K. is knighted, they are given the status of a knight byu a king or queen;
2. to bestow a knighthood on a man;

Thursday, April 23, 2015

spill & own goals

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Petra Hilton: [father of the House; whip up; spill; sack 17:02] It would appear that the father of the House, Philip Ruddock is being used as a scapegoat for the Prime Minister's unpopularity, being sacked for failure to whip up support for the PM in the 60 hours prior to the spill vote, while Tony Abbott has had 17 months to whip up support for his Prime Ministership and has failed miserably to do so. Has the wrong man been sacked? 

Lisa Wilkinson: [own goals; laundry list; knighting; knighthood;] This came at the end of a week when the Prime Minister said that we were about to have good government and I think everybody had exactly the same reaction: so, what have we been having for the last 16 or 17 months. So, I think, I think the problem that Tony Abbott has now is that there are so many own goals, I mean, there is almost a laundry list now, from you - and having interviewed the Prime Minister many times, you know, most particularly also when he was opposition leader. He was very much - he was very effective opposition leader, because he was really good at tearing down the government. But one of the strongest messages that he would come back with, during our interviews, was 'Julia Gillard broke a promise. We will not break promises'. So we've got broken promises no cuts to pensions', 'no cuts to the ABC or SBS', 'no cuts to education', the submarine contracts look like that have been broken. It's just been one thing after the other and then we've had silly mistakes and silly decisions, like the knighting of Prince Philip. This is a man who has got 30 knighthoods and, I think, if you were to poll any number of Australians walking down George Street right now and you said : "Of all the royal family who do you think has the closest connection to the average Aussie." I think Prince Philip wouldn't even make the top 50 ...

Definitions:

spill:
1. to reveal or divulge something, often unintentionally;
...

own goals:
1. sth. you do that accidentally harms you, often when you intended to harm sb. else, mainly used in British English;
2. a goal that you accidentally score against your own team, mainly used in British English;

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

father of the House & whip up

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Petra Hilton: [father of the House; whip up; spill; sack 17:02] It would appear that the father of the House, Philip Ruddock is being used as a scapegoat for the Prime Minister's unpopularity, being sacked for failure to whip up support for the PM in the 60 hours prior to the spill vote, while Tony Abbott has had 17 months to whip up support for his Prime Ministership and has failed miserably to do so. Has the wrong man been sacked? 

Definitions:

father of the House:
Father of the House is a term that has by tradition been unofficially bestowed on certain members of some national legislatures, most notably the House of Commons in the United Kingdom. In some legislatures the term refers to the oldest member, but in others it refers the longest-serving member. The term Mother of the House or Mother of Parliament is also found, although the usage varies between countries. It is used simply as the female alternative to Father of the House, being applied when the relevant member is a woman.

whip up:
1. to arouse or provoke a strong feeling or reaction in a group of people;
2. ...

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

succumb & sad to say

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Greg Sheridan: [sense of proportion; succumb;sad to say; fall back; 15:59 ] To be honest with you, I don't and, I do think this is a terrible tragedy. But, of course, Indonesia is not alone in having the death penalty. I think we need to keep even our justifiable anger in some sense of proportion. I don't think Jokowi would have let this get to where it is, if he was going to change his mind now. I agree with what Bryan and Malcolm are saying that it would show great strength, but in fact to do it now would look as though he was succumbing to Australian pressure. SBY was strong enough to stop the execution. He was not quite strong enough to abolish the policy of execution and, sad to say, around Asia execution is still very very common. In China, in Vietnam, in Singapore, in Malaysia, it's not an uncommon practice and Indonesia was kind of - in many respects, Indonesia is leading the way in South-east Asia with the democracy now and, it was leading the way on this issue and, I think, Jokowi is letting it fall back a bit.

Definitions:

succumb:
1. to lose your ability to fight against someone or something, and to allow them to control or persuade you;
...

sad to say:
used when talking about something that makes you unhappy;

Monday, April 20, 2015

boycott & sense of proportion

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Bryan Stevenson: [boycott] Well, I agree that the America has been a terrible witness on this issue. But, you know, I think that there is a need for resistance. I mean, we couldn't - I grew up in a community where black children who couldn't go to the public school. So I started my education in a coloured school and people protested. The civil rights movement in America began with a boycott , with people choosing and making a hard choice and not to ride the buses. So they could push the society to protect the rights of people who were disfavoured. I can't speak to what the right response will be for the Australian government. But we can't be indifferent to violations of human rights. America changed when people changed, when protests changed. South Africa changed, when protests changed. Countries around the world that continue to violate human rights change when the rest of world stands up and says something clear and definitive about the unacceptability of that conduct. 

Greg Sheridan: [sense of proportion; succumb;sad to say; fall back; 15:59 ] To be honest with you, I don't and, I do think this is a terrible tragedy. But, of course, Indonesia is not alone in having the death penalty. I think we need to keep even our justifiable anger in some sense of proportion. I don't think Jokowi would have let this get to where it is, if he was going to change his mind now. I agree with what Bryan and Malcolm are saying that it would show great strength, but in fact to do it now would look as though he was succumbing to Australian pressure. SBY was strong enough to stop the execution. He was not quite strong enough to abolish the policy of execution and, sad to say, around Asia execution is still very very common. In China, in Vietnam, in Singapore, in Malaysia, it's not an uncommon practice and Indonesia was kind of - in many respects, Indonesia is leading the way in South-east Asia with the democracy now and, it was leading the way on this issue and, I think, Jokowi is letting it fall back a bit.

Definitions:

boycott:
to refuse to buy, use or take part in sth as a way of protesting;

sense of proportion:
the ability to judge the relative importance or seriousness of things;

Sunday, April 19, 2015

norm & gesture

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Bryan Stevenson: [extradite; subscribe to; unprecedented; norm; gesture; 12:48] I do. I mean, I think that for many years, many States would not extradite people to America if they were going to face the death penalty. I think States do have an obligation to seek the kind of broad commitment to basic human rights that most countries subscribe to. It's not unprecedented. The international norms that have been adopted and enforced around world. I think, have had a really profound impact on protecting the right of disfavoured people, advancing human rights and, in that respect, I think it's not only appropriate but necessary that foreign governments provide services to people who are foreign nationals. Indonesia is doing that on behalf of Indonesian nationals. Right, they are acting on their behalf and, so I think it's entirely appropriate that we do that. But I also want to just kind of reinforce what Mr. Turnbull just said, because I do think that the most profound expression of strength and commitment to basic human rights is when you do not engage in these kind of really cruel and barbarian practices. I have stood next  to people who are within 72 hours of execution. It is cruel. It is barbaric. It's barbaric for everybody involved, including the people who participate in these executions and, I think for me at least, what my work has taught me, and this is in response to Emily's question as well, I think we are all more than the worst thing we have ever done. That's what my work has taught me. I think if somebody tells a lie, they are not just a liar. if they take something that doesn't belong to them, they are not just a thief. I think even when you kill someone, you are not just a killer. And these two men are not just drug dealers and we can't execute just drug dealer. when there is more to it. They are human beings. They are Australian citizens. And it's all of that other stuff that I think we have to protect in our circumstances and to another reason why I think our strongest gesture is to recognize that a civil society, a society committed to human rights, doesn't engage in killing its citizens. 

Definitions:

norm:
a standard pattern of behavior that is considered normal in a society;

gesture:
1. something that you do or say to show a particular feeling or intention;
2. a movement that you make with your hands, your head or your face to show a particular meaning;

Saturday, April 18, 2015

subscribe & unprecedented

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Bryan Stevenson: [extradite; subscribe to; unprecedented; norm; gesture; 12:48] I do. I mean, I think that for many years, many States would not extradite people to America if they were going to face the death penalty. I think States do have an obligation to seek the kind of broad commitment to basic human rights that most countries subscribe to. It's not unprecedented. The international norms that have been adopted and enforced around world. I think, have had a really profound impact on protecting the right of disfavoured people, advancing human rights and, in that respect, I think it's not only appropriate but necessary that foreign governments provide services to people who are foreign nationals. Indonesia is doing that on behalf of Indonesian nationals. Right, they are acting on their behalf and, so I think it's entirely appropriate that we do that. But I also want to just kind of reinforce what Mr. Turnbull just said, because I do think that the most profound expression of strength and commitment to basic human rights is when you do not engage in these kind of really cruel and barbarian practices. I have stood next  to people who are within 72 hours of execution. It is cruel. It is barbaric. It's barbaric for everybody involved, including the people who participate in these executions and, I think for me at least, what my work has taught me, and this is in response to Emily's question as well, I think we are all more than the worst thing we have ever done. That's what my work has taught me. I think if somebody tells a lie, they are not just a liar. if they take something that doesn't belong to them, they are not just a thief. I think even when you kill someone, you are not just a killer. And these two men are not just drug dealers and we can't execute just drug dealer. when there is more to it. They are human beings. They are Australian citizens. And it's all of that other stuff that I think we have to protect in our circumstances and to another reason why I think our strongest gesture a strong is to recognize that a civil society, a society committed to human rights, doesn't engage in killing its citizens. 

Definitions:

subscribe:
1. to support or believe in a theory or view;
...

unprecedented:
that has never happened, been done or been known before;

Friday, April 17, 2015

firing squad & extradite

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Malcolm Turnbull: [counterproductive; unanimous; the House of Representatives; extend; firing squad; 10:30] Well, as Tony Abbott said today or yesterday, you, in making the submissions to the Indonesian government. You have to be careful that what you do is not actually counterproductive. No government likes being pushed around by another government. So, the arguments to - you've got to explain sincerely how the depth of feeling in Australia and you saw that with the unanimous vote of the House of Representatives calling for the Indonesian government to extend clemency and not execute these men. It's important that friends speak honestly with each other and we explain to Indonesians how deeply we feel about it, and how Australians will be hurt by these men being executed. But equally, we - threats and so forth could be very very counterproductive. That's why, as I said in the House of Representatives and I say again tonight, I think, you know, Greg has just said that president Jokowi is already looking like a weak president. Well, you're a foreign affairs expert. I would not comment on that, but I would say this, that a Indonesian president, that had the strength to say as SBY said: we're a big enough, a great enough, a good enough country, not to have to execute criminals. We don't have to lower ourselves to the business of putting up convicted criminals in front of firing squad and shooting them. We are bigger than that. We have a bigger love. We have a greater mercy than any of their crimes, and that's why we don't lower ourselves to kill them. That's a sign of strength and I hope that in the next little while the president of Indonesia shows this great strength, the strength of mercy.

Bryan Stevenson: [extradite; subscribe to; unprecedented; norm; gesture; 12:48] I do. I mean, I think that for many years, many States would not extradite people to America if they were going to face the death penalty. I think States do have an obligation to seek the kind of broad commitment to basic human rights that most countries subscribe to. It's not unprecedented. The international norms that have been adopted and enforced around world. I think, have had a really profound impact on protecting the right of disfavoured people, advancing human rights and, in that respect, I think it's not only appropriate but necessary that foreign governments provide services to people who are foreign nationals. Indonesia is doing that on behalf of Indonesian nationals. Right, they are acting on their behalf and, so I think it's entirely appropriate that we do that. But I also want to just kind of reinforce what Mr. Turnbull just said, because I do think that the most profound expression of strength and commitment to basic human rights is when you do not engage in these kind of really cruel and barbarian practices. I have stood next  to people who are within 72 hours of execution. It is cruel. It is barbaric. It's barbaric for everybody involved, including the people who participate in these executions and, I think for me at least, what my work has taught me, and this is in response to Emily's question as well, I think we are all more than the worst thing we have ever done. That's what my work has taught me. I think if somebody tells a lie, they are not just a liar. if they take something that doesn't belong to them, they are not just a thief. I think even when you kill someone, you are not just a killer. And these two men are not just drug dealers and we can't execute just drug dealer. when there is more to it. They are human beings. They are Australian citizens. And it's all of that other stuff that I think we have to protect in our circumstances and to another reason why I think our strongest gesture a strong is to recognize that a civil society, a society committed to human rights, doesn't engage in killing its citizens. 

Definitions:

firing squad:
a group of soldiers who are ordered to shoot and kill sb who is found guilty of a crime;

extradite:
to officially send back sb who has been accused or found guilty of a crime to the country where the crime was committed;

Thursday, April 16, 2015

the House of Representatives & extend

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Malcolm Turnbull: [counterproductive; unanimous; the House of Representatives; extend; firing squad; 10:30] Well, as Tony Abbott said today or yesterday, you, in making the submissions to the Indonesian government. You have to be careful that what you do is not actually counterproductive. No government likes being pushed around by another government. So, the arguments to - you've got to explain sincerely how the depth of feeling in Australia and you saw that with the unanimous vote of the House of Representatives calling for the Indonesian government to extend clemency and not execute these men. It's important that friends speak honestly with each other and we explain to Indonesians how deeply we feel about it, and how Australians will be hurt by these men being executed. But equally, we - threats and so forth could be very very counterproductive. That's why, as I said in the House of Representatives and I say again tonight, I think, you know, Greg has just said that president Jokowi is already looking like a weak president. Well, you're a foreign affairs expert. I would not comment on that, but I would say this, that a Indonesian president, that had the strength to say as SBY said: we're a big enough, a great enough, a good enough country, not to have to execute criminals. We don't have to lower ourselves to the business of putting up convicted criminals in front of firing squad and shooting them. We are bigger than that. We have a bigger love. We have a greater mercy than any of their crimes, and that's why we don't lower ourselves to kill them. That's a sign of strength and I hope that in the next little while the president of Indonesia shows this great strength, the strength of mercy.

Definitions:

the House of Representatives:
the largest part of Congress in the US, or of the Parliament in Australia, whose members are elected by the people of the country;

extend:
1. to offer or provide something to somebody;
2. to work or make somebody or something work, as hard as possible to achieve the best possible result;

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

counterproductive & unanimous

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Malcolm Turnbull: [counterproductive; unanimous; the House of Representatives; extend; firing squad; 10:30] Well, as Tony Abbott said today or yesterday, you, in making the submissions to the Indonesian government. You have to be careful that what you do is not actually counterproductive. No government likes being pushed around by another government. So, the arguments to - you've got to explain sincerely how the depth of feeling in Australia and you saw that with the unanimous vote of the House of Representatives calling for the Indonesian government to extend clemency and not execute these men. It's important that friends speak honestly with each other and we explain to Indonesians how deeply we feel about it, and how Australians will be hurt by these men being executed. But equally, we - threats and so forth could be very very counterproductive. That's why, as I said in the House of Representatives and I say again tonight, I think, you know, Greg has just said that president Jokowi is already looking like a weak president. Well, you're a foreign affairs expert. I would not comment on that, but I would say this, that a Indonesian president, that had the strength to say as SBY said: we're a big enough, a great enough, a good enough country, not to have to execute criminals. We don't have to lower ourselves to the business of putting up convicted criminals in front of firing squad and shooting them. We are bigger than that. We have a bigger love. We have a greater mercy than any of their crimes, and that's why we don't lower ourselves to kill them. That's a sign of strength and I hope that in the next little while the president of Indonesia shows this great strength, the strength of mercy.

Definitions:

counterproductive:
having the opposite effect to the one which was intended;

unanimous:
if a decision or an opinion is unanimous , it is agreed or shared by everyone in a group 

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

de facto & clemency

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Greg Sheridan: [execution; populism; machination; de facto; clemency; 08:17 ] Well, after the last Bali bombers were rescued, I think in 2008. SBY was personally revolted by the business of executions, and he didn't execute anyone again until 2013, and then there was  a very small number of executions in 2013. Now SBY was strong enough to do that against popular opinion and against the general outrage that the average Indonesian citizen feels at drugs trade. Of course, it is the sad truth that corrupt  Indonesian police are at the centre of the Indonesian drugs trade. Now I think Jokowi is emerging already, and I said this with no pleasure, as a weak president, who is caught between the demands of populism on one hand and machinations traditional Jakarta elite politicians - Megawati Sukarnoputri, Prabowo Subianot - and he is not strong enough to exercise the de facto clemency which SBY exercised. 

Definitions:

de facto:
existing as a fact although it may not be legally accepted as existing;

clemency:
kindness shown to sb when they are being punished; willingness not to punish sb so severely;

Monday, April 13, 2015

populism & machination

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Greg Sheridan: [execution; populism; machination; de facto; clemency; 08:17 ] Well, after the last Bali bombers were rescued, I think in 2008. SBY was personally revolted by the business of executions, and he didn't execute anyone again until 2013, and then there was  a very small number of executions in 2013. Now SBY was strong enough to do that against popular opinion and against the general outrage that the average Indonesian citizen feels at drugs trade. Of course, it is the sad truth that corrupt  Indonesian police are at the centre of the Indonesian drugs trade. Now I think Jokowi is emerging already, and I said this with no pleasure, as a weak president, who is caught between the demands of populism on one hand and machinations traditional Jakarta elite politicians - Megawati Sukarnoputri, Prabowo Subianot - and he is not strong enough to exercise the de facto clemency which SBY exercised. 

Definitions:

populism:
a type of politics that claims to represent the opinions and wishes of ordinary people.

machination:
a secret and complicated plan.

Sunday, April 12, 2015

retrospect & execution

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Greg Sheridan: [impulse; be sick of ; retrospect] Well, Tony, this is very difficult, because you've got two conflicting impulses here. Both of which are right. The government must do something substantial to show its displeasure with Indonesia over this if Indonesia goes ahead and kills two Australians. But not only is this a tragedy for the young men, this is a terrible tragedy for Indonesia. I love Indonesia. I love the Australia-Indonesia relationship. So the government shouldn't do anything which destroys the Australia-Indonesia relationship. But I think what this matter brings up is that this is a terrible tragedy for Indonesia and indicates an awful weakness in president, Jokowi who is already really in a kind of political crisis. You know, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, he's a bit like John Howard, people were sick of him at the end but, by god, it looks good in retrospect and after the ...

Greg Sheridan: [execution; populism; machination; de facto; clemency; 08:17 ] Well, after the last Bali bombers were rescued, I think in 2008. SBY was personally revolted by the business of executions, and he didn't execute anyone again until 2013, and then there was  a very small number of executions in 2013. Now SBY was strong enough to do that against popular opinion and against the general outrage that the average Indonesian citizen feels at drugs trade. Of course, it is the sad truth that corrupt  Indonesian police are at the centre of the Indonesian drugs trade. Now I think Jokowi is emerging already, and I said this with no pleasure, as a weak president, who is caught between the demands of populism on one hand and machinations traditional Jakarta elite politicians - Megawati Sukarnoputri, Prabowo Subianot - and he is not strong enough to exercise the de facto clemency which SBY exercised. 

Definitions:

retrospect:
the remembering of past events;

execution:
1. the act of killing sb, especially as a legal punishment;
2. ...

Saturday, April 11, 2015

impulse & be sick of

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Greg Sheridan: [impulse; be sick of ; retrospect] Well, Tony, this is very difficult, because you've got two conflicting impulses here. Both of which are right. The government must do something substantial to show its displeasure with Indonesia over this if Indonesia goes ahead and kills two Australians. But not only is this a tragedy for the young men, this is a terrible tragedy for Indonesia. I love Indonesia. I love the Australia-Indonesia relationship. So the government shouldn't do anything which destroys the Australia-Indonesia relationship. But I think what this matter brings up is that this is a terrible tragedy for Indonesia and indicates an awful weakness in president, Jokowi who is already really in a kind of political crisis. You know, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, he's a bit like John Howard, people were sick of him at the end but, by god, it looks good in retrospect and after the ...

Definitions:

impulse:
something that causes sb/sth to do sth or to develop and make progress;

be sick of:
tired of someone or something, especially something that one must do again and again or someone or something that one must deal with repeatedly.

Friday, April 10, 2015

ice & the eleventh hour

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Lisa Wilkinson: [up close; ice] It colours my understanding of people who want these two men killed, because if you've seen up (a) close a young life destroyed by drugs which I have, which my family has, then you want the people who do that work to suffer. I've never wanted to see somebody who does that work die, but, you know, certainly the drug laws need looking at, because whatever we've got at the moment, it's not working. The ice problem in this country at the moment is at epidemic levels. So, that has to be dealt with, I mean that's a separate (separated) issue. But in this case, I just - I can't sanction murder. 

​Catherine King: ​[the 11th hour] ​You know, look, I think that it's important to understand the concept of redemption as well​. You know, we abolished the death penalty in this country because we believe very firmly that​ our​ ​justice system​, you know, ​ deserve - people deserve​ to be punished but we also need to try and rehabilitate them. We had those debates in this country and I think is there anything worth killing someone for and what does that say about the nation, the state and the nation that you​ come from. These families, these young men have made a terrible mistake that has had very big consequences and would have had big consequences, of course, had they not been caught as well for many Australians but i think it's a nature of our civil society or a measure of our civil society that we have abolished the death penalty in this country and I think that all of us are certainly pleaing that the Indonesian government sees some sense at eleventh hour and does not execute these young men and the power, potentially, of the message that they sent to other people about what not to do and their story and about how they have rehabilitated in prison. I think it will be an important one but one that won't be if die this week.

Definitions:

ice:
1. a smokable form of methamphetamine used as an illegal drug
...

the 11th hour:
the last possible moment that you can do sth, especially prevent sth. bad from happening

Thursday, April 9, 2015

colour & up close

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Lisa Wilkinson: [up close; ice] It colours my understanding of people who want these two men killed, because if you've seen up (a) close a young life destroyed by drugs which I have, which my family has, then you want the people who do that work to suffer. I've never wanted to see somebody who does that work die, but, you know, certainly the drug laws need looking at, because whatever we've got at the moment, it's not working. The ice problem in this country at the moment is at epidemic levels. So, that has to be dealt with, I mean that's a separate (separated) issue. But in this case, I just - I can't sanction murder. 

Definitions:

colour:
1. to influence an opinion or judgment, especially so as to make it less objective;
...

up close:
1. at very close range;
2. in great detail;

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

inmate & unrest

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Lisa Wilkinson: [sanction; make no mistake; rehabilitation; may as well; tourism; inmate; population;3:04 ]I'm very aware at that time Emily's view is shared by a not insignificant number of Australians, that if you walk through the airport, you know exactly what the consequences are if you are carrying drugs, that death is very much a possibility if you are caught. Many of those people who hold that view are from families who have suffered the consequences of drug addiction and have lost family members and seen lives destroyed. I am a member of family who has gone through that, so I understand that thinking. However, make no mistake, this is state-sanctioned murder. And I don't believe anybody has the right to take another person's life. Jail has to be about punishment.It has to be about people understanding how wrong the thing is that they have done. But it also has to be about rehabilitation. Otherwise, what's the point. You may as well just kill everybody as soon as you put them in jail and I think Indonesia and Bali in particular is really going to pay the price if they do take the lives of these two men. I think they will suffer a drop in tourism in Bali. But I think also the message that they send to inmates, particularly in Indonesia, is don't do what these guys did which is work really hard to rehabilitate. They became, as I understand, great mentors to other young prisoners who found their way through what these young men were teaching them. And I think the unrest that will happen amongst the prison population will be significant.

Definitions:

inmate:
one of the people living in an institution such as a prison or a mental hospital;

unrest:
a political situation in which people are angry and likely to protest or fight;

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

rehabilitation & may as well

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Lisa Wilkinson: [sanction; make no mistake; rehabilitation; may as well; tourism; inmate; population;3:04 ]I'm very aware at that time Emily's view is shared by a not insignificant number of Australians, that if you walk through the airport, you know exactly what the consequences are if you are carrying drugs, that death is very much a possibility if you are caught. Many of those people who hold that view are from families who have suffered the consequences of drug addiction and have lost family members and seen lives destroyed. I am a member of family who has gone through that, so I understand that thinking. However, make no mistake, this is state-sanctioned murder. And I don't believe anybody has the right to take another person's life. Jail has to be about punishment.It has to be about people understanding how wrong the thing is that they have done. But it also has to be about rehabilitation. Otherwise, what's the point. You may as well just kill everybody as soon as you put them in jail and I think Indonesia and Bali in particular is really going to pay the price if they do take the lives of these two men. I think they will suffer a drop in tourism in Bali. But I think also the message that they send to inmates, particularly in Indonesia, is don't do what these guys did which is work really hard to rehabilitate. They became, as I understand, great mentors to other young prisoners who found their way through what these young men were teaching them. And I think the unrest that will happen amongst the prison population will be significant.

Definitions:

rehabilitation:
rehabilitate:
to help somebody to have a normal, useful life again after they have been very ill/sick or in prison for a long time;

may as well/may well:
used for suggesting something when you can not think of anything better to do.

sanction & make no mistake

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Lisa Wilkinson: [sanction; make no mistake; rehabilitation; may as well; tourism; inmate; population;3:04 ]I'm very aware at that time Emily's view is shared by a not insignificant number of Australians, that if you walk through the airport, you know exactly what the consequences are if you are carrying drugs, that death is very much a possibility if you are caught. Many of those people who hold that view are from families who have suffered the consequences of drug addiction and have lost family members and seen lives destroyed. I am a member of family who has gone through that, so I understand that thinking. However, make no mistake, this is state-sanctioned murder. And I don't believe anybody has the right to take another person's life. Jail has to be about punishment.It has to be about people understanding how wrong the thing is that they have done. But it also has to be about rehabilitation. Otherwise, what's the point. Your may as well just kill everybody as soon as you put them in jail and I think Indonesia and Bali in particular is really going to pay the price if they do take the lives of these two men. I think they will suffer a drop in tourism in Bali. But I think also the message that they send to inmates, particularly in Indonesia, is don't do what these guys did which is work really hard to rehabilitate. They became, as I understand, great mentors to other young prisoners who found their way through what these young men were teaching them. And I think the unrest that will happen amongst the prison population will be significant.

Definitions:

sanction:
1. official permission or approval for an action or a change;
2. a course of action that can be used, if necessary, to make people obey a law or behave in a particular way;

make no mistake:
used for emphasizing that you mean what you are saying;


heroin & culpability

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Emily Messer. [heroin; 01:08] When entering (enter) in Indonesia, everyone must sign a document that clearly states the death penalty as punishment for importing and exporting drugs. So why is it that Australia is putting [Australians put] in so much time and effort to save these two men when they clearly understood the consequences of [consequence as] exporting heroin but did so anyway?


Bryan Stevenson: [culpability;hypocritical; ]Well, I think the question of death penalty isn't a really resolved by asking do people deserve to die for the crimes they committed. It's really not about them. I think the death penalty is a question for society. It is do we deserve to kill? And the government, in my judgement, is doing something quite tragic by executing these people. Most of the people who have been executed in Indonesia are foreign nationals. And when you are different, you are often presumed dangerous and presumed guilty. I come from a country where 84% of the people who have been executed in America are black. There is a presumption of dangerousness and guilt that has undermined our use of the death penalty. We have a system that treats you better if you are poor and guilty than if you are rich and innocent. So, wealth not culpability shapes outcomes. And our county does not deserve to kill. The death penalty is a perfect punishment and requires a perfect system and that does not exist in Indonesia, I think it actually quite hypocritical for the Indonesian government, to be spending millions of dollars to spare Indonesian nationals who are being subject to death penalty around the world, and having a death penalty that primarily executed a foreign nationals.  Drug dependency is not going to be challenged to overcome with direct punishment. The people who are heroin addicts, aren't thinking about what's the consequence of my using heroin Countries that have dealt with drug dependency as a health issue, have made progress, those who have dealt with it as a crime issue have made tremendous outcomes of injustice and inequality, and I think that's what we're seeing with the instance of these men in Indonesia now. 


Definitions:

heroin:
a powerful illegal drug made from morphine , that some people take for pleasure and can become addicted to;

culpability:
responsibility for a fault or wrong; blame.

Sunday, April 5, 2015

on air & detention

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Tony Jones: [civil rights; capital punishment; initiative; on air; detention;] Good evening and welcome to Q and A. I'm Tony Jones. Answering your question tonight: Foreign Editor of The Australian, Greg Sheridan; Communications minister, Malcolm Turnbull; Journalist and host of The Today Show, Lisa Wilkinson; civil rights lawyer and capital punishment opponent Bryan Stevenson who runs Alabama's Equal Justice Initiative; and the shadow minister for health, Catherine King. Please welcome our panel. Remember, if you sent us a twitter question add @qanda to help us find it and put it on air. Facebook followers want us to discuss children in detention, we'll get to that later. Our first question tonight comes from Emily Messer.

Definitions:

on air:
being broadcast on radio or television;

detention:
the state of being kept in a place, especially a prison, and prevented from leaving;

Saturday, April 4, 2015

capital punishment & initiative

Quotations:

qanda_2015_ep03

Tony Jones: [civil rights; capital punishment; initiative; on air; detention;] Good evening and welcome to Q and A. I'm Tony Jones. Answering your question tonight: Foreign Editor of The Australian, Greg Sheridan; Communications minister, Malcolm Turnbull; Journalist and host of The Today Show, Lisa Wilkinson; civil rights lawyer and capital punishment opponent Bryan Stevenson who runs Alabama's Equal Justice Initiative; and the shadow minister for health, Catherine King. Please welcome our panel. Remember, if you sent us a twitter question add @qanda to help us find it and put it on air. Facebook followers want us to discuss children in detention, we'll get to that later. Our first question tonight comes from Emily Messer.

Definitions:

capital punishment:
punishment by death;

initiative:
a new plan for dealing with a particular problem or for achieving a particular purpose

Thursday, April 2, 2015

the sound of things & civil rights

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Ben Elton: [dis; spectrum; put down; traduce; heated; drop a brick; the sound of things; 56:32] Well, of course there is. There is a lot anywhere and I do believe that good satire has to have a point of view. I think, one of the problems with modern political comedy is it tends to be generally everybody just dissing all politicians. I think, actually, the real problem in our culture at the moment is this new concept that - they're all the same and they're all pointless, the idea what's the point of voting, everyone is the same. I don't think they're all the same. I don't think they're all bad or they're all good and I don't think all Liberals are bad and all Labor are good. There is clearly some highly principled politicians right across the political spectrum and yet we're now living in a satirical culture, a comic culture which tends to presume that they are all awful. Certainly, in Britain we've seen this very much with the birth of the sort of panel show where everyone is vying with each other to put down politicians and I actually think if we go very much further, we're going to get politicians we deserve if we constantly traduced them and I mean, we've had a, you know, a fairly nice heated but we've stuck to issues. We've talked about what people are actually saying. And one thing I don't agree with is that the democratic process is broken and that all politicians are the same. I think we need to listen, we need to have a debate, we need to take our choice. And I think satire can play a role in that, but the satirist has to state where they stand. I think satire without principle is a very toothless animal indeed. And I think that is something that has been growing in comedy with the general hating culture, the general sneering, you know, hate, hate, hate. And I think it's important to, you know, say what you think and if you can do a good joke about it, great. It seems these guys didn't. Clearly we have over-analysed one little - so I'm feeling really sorry for whoever it was. I mean they, you know, they have dropped a brick. there's no question but the sound  of things. But my view is that satire, I agree, has a real place in the political debate. But it should be based on principle, whatever side. PJ O'Rourke he is a very funny man. He is a republican and he is very much right wing views, but he is a great writer, a very funny writer. He tells you what he is thinking and he makes a good joke about it. I like to think. I try  and do that sometimes when I am trying and in the same game, but I believe you should speak from principle as we are all doing tonight.

qanda_2015_ep03

Tony Jones: [civil rights; capital punishment; initiative; on air; detention;] Good evening and welcome to Q and A. I'm Tony Jones. Answering your question tonight: Foreign Editor of The Australian, Greg Sheridan; Communications minister, Malcolm Turnbull; Journalist and host of The Today Show, Lisa Wilkinson; civil rights lawyer and capital punishment opponent Bryan Stevenson who runs Alabama's Equal Justice Initiative; and the shadow minister for health, Catherine King. Please welcome our panel. Remember, if you sent us a twitter question add @qanda to help us find it and put it on air. Facebook followers want us to discuss children in detention, we'll get to that later. Our first question tonight comes from Emily Messer.


Definitions:

the sound of things:
the idea or impression that you get of sb/sth from what sb says or what you read;

civil rights:
the rights that every person in a society has, for example to be treated equally, to be able to vote, work, etc. whatever their sex, race or religion;

heated & drop a brick

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Ben Elton: [dis; spectrum; put down; traduce; heated; drop a brick; the sound of things; 56:32] Well, of course there is. There is a lot anywhere and I do believe that good satire has to have a point of view. I think, one of the problems with modern political comedy is it tends to be generally everybody just dissing all politicians. I think, actually, the real problem in our culture at the moment is this new concept that - they're all the same and they're all pointless, the idea what's the point of voting, everyone is the same. I don't think they're all the same. I don't think they're all bad or they're all good and I don't think all Liberals are bad and all Labor are good. There is clearly some highly principled politicians right across the political spectrum and yet we're now living in a satirical culture, a comic culture which tends to presume that they are all awful. Certainly, in Britain we've seen this very much with the birth of the sort of panel show where everyone is vying with each other to put down politicians and I actually think if we go very much further, we're going to get politicians we deserve if we constantly traduced them and I mean, we've had a, you know, a fairly nice heated but we've stuck to issues. We've talked about what people are actually saying. And one thing I don't agree with is that the democratic process is broken and that all politicians are the same. I think we need to listen, we need to have a debate, we need to take our choice. And I think satire can play a role in that, but the satirist has to state where they stand. I think satire without principle is a very toothless animal indeed. And I think that is something that has been growing in comedy with the general hating culture, the general sneering, you know, hate, hate, hate. And I think it's important to, you know, say what you think and if you can do a good joke about it, great. It seems these guys didn't. Clearly we have over-analysed one little - so I'm feeling really sorry for whoever it was. I mean they, you know, they have dropped a brick. there's no question but the sound  of things. But my view is that satire, I agree, has a real place in the political debate. But it should be based on principle, whatever side. PJ O'Rourke he is a very funny man. He is a republican and he is very much right wing views, but he is a great writer, a very funny writer. He tells you what he is thinking and he makes a good joke about it. I like to think. I try  and do that sometimes when I am trying and in the same game, but I believe you should speak from principle as we are all doing tonight.

Definitions:

heated:
1. a heated discussion or argument is one in which people get angry and excited;
...

drop a brick:
Also, drop a clanger. Say something indiscreet, commit a social gaffe. 

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

put down & traduce

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Ben Elton: [dis; spectrum; put down; traduce; heated; drop a brick; the sound of things; 56:32] Well, of course there is. There is a lot anywhere and I do believe that good satire has to have a point of view. I think, one of the problems with modern political comedy is it tends to be generally everybody just dissing all politicians. I think, actually, the real problem in our culture at the moment is this new concept that - they're all the same and they're all pointless, the idea what's the point of voting, everyone is the same. I don't think they're all the same. I don't think they're all bad or they're all good and I don't think all Liberals are bad and all Labor are good. There is clearly some highly principled politicians right across the political spectrum and yet we're now living in a satirical culture, a comic culture which tends to presume that they are all awful. Certainly, in Britain we've seen this very much with the birth of the sort of panel show where everyone is vying with each other to put down politicians and I actually think if we go very much further, we're going to get politicians we deserve if we constantly traduced them and I mean, we've had a, you know, a fairly nice heated but we've stuck to issues. We've talked about what people are actually saying. And one thing I don't agree with is that the democratic process is broken and that all politicians are the same. I think we need to listen, we need to have a debate, we need to take our choice. And I think satire can play a role in that, but the satirist has to state where they stand. I think satire without principle is a very toothless animal indeed. And I think that is something that has been growing in comedy with the general hating culture, the general sneering, you know, hate, hate, hate. And I think it's important to, you know, say what you think and if you can do a good joke about it, great. It seems these guys didn't. Clearly we have over-analysed one little - so I'm feeling really sorry for whoever it was. I mean they, you know, they have dropped a brick. there's no question but the sound  of things. But my view is that satire, I agree, has a real place in the political debate. But it should be based on principle, whatever side. PJ O'Rourke he is a very funny man. He is a republican and he is very much right wing views, but he is a great writer, a very funny writer. He tells you what he is thinking and he makes a good joke about it. I like to think. I try  and do that sometimes when I am trying and in the same game, but I believe you should speak from principle as we are all doing tonight.

Definitions:

put down:
1. to make somebody or something appear ridiculous or unimportant by being critical or scornful
2. ...

traduce:
to say things about sb that are unpleasant or not true