Tuesday, March 31, 2015

dis & spectrum

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Ben Elton: [dis; spectrum; put down; traduce; heated; drop a brick; the sound of things; 56:32] Well, of course there is. There is a lot anywhere and I do believe that good satire has to have a point of view. I think, one of the problems with modern political comedy is it tends to be generally everybody just dissing all politicians. I think, actually, the real problem in our culture at the moment is this new concept that - they're all the same and they're all pointless, the idea what's the point of voting, everyone is the same. I don't think they're all the same. I don't think they're all bad or they're all good and I don't think all Liberals are bad and all Labor are good. There is clearly some highly principled politicians right across the political spectrum and yet we're now living in a satirical culture, a comic culture which tends to presume that they are all awful. Certainly, in Britain we've seen this very much with the birth of the sort of panel show where everyone is vying with each other to put down politicians and I actually think if we go very much further, we're going to get politicians we deserve if we constantly traduced them and I mean, we've had a, you know, a fairly nice heated but we've stuck to issues. We've talked about what people are actually saying. And one thing I don't agree with is that the democratic process is broken and that all politicians are the same. I think we need to listen, we need to have a debate, we need to take our choice. And I think satire can play a role in that, but the satirist has to state where they stand. I think satire without principle is a very toothless animal indeed. And I think that is something that has been growing in comedy with the general hating culture, the general sneering, you know, hate, hate, hate. And I think it's important to, you know, say what you think and if you can do a good joke about it, great. It seems these guys didn't. Clearly we have over-analysed one little - so I'm feeling really sorry for whoever it was. I mean they, you know, they have dropped a brick. there's no question but the sound  of things. But my view is that satire, I agree, has a real place in the political debate. But it should be based on principle, whatever side. PJ O'Rourke he is a very funny man. He is a republican and he is very much right wing views, but he is a great writer, a very funny writer. He tells you what he is thinking and he makes a good joke about it. I like to think. I try  and do that sometimes when I am trying and in the same game, but I believe you should speak from principle as we are all doing tonight.

Definitions:

dis:
to show a lack of respect for sb, especially by saying insulting things to them;

spectrum:
1. the whole range of ideas, qualities, situations, etc. that are possible
2. ...

Monday, March 30, 2015

tone deaf & satirical

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Sarrah Le Marquand: [skit; flagship; incompatible; lightly; refer; slap on the wrist/slap one's wrist; look into;  tone deaf; 55:05] I'll take that as a comment. I think the most offensive thing about that skit on 7.30 was that it was deeply unfunny, and it went on for several minutes as well. If you're going to waste everyone's precious time on a national flagship current affairs programme like that with something that isn't funny, isn't insightful, isn't speaking at any level in terms of entertainment or information, then keep it really quick. I have a slightly different view, in that I actually don't think that satire and serious television are incompatible. I think there is a forum there to take things a bit lightly. But I also think in terms of some of the speculation that government should investigate and this should be referred to people to look into and, you know, wrist should be slapped. No, I think probably the 7.30 editorial team, have hopefully listened to this, they've realised that it was very tone deaf. They should be coming out with something a lot better than that. And, you know, it's subjective ..  

Tony Jones: [satirical] I'm sorry that on a serious current affairs show like this I made a satirical comment about Andrew Bob. Now, Tanya Plibersek.
Definitions:

tone deaf:
1. Unable to distinguish differences in musical pitch.
2. Unable to appreciate or understand the concerns or difficulties of others;

satirical:
satirical writing or art uses humour to criticize people or things and make them seem silly

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Fwd: look into & slap one's wrist


Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Sarrah Le Marquand: [skit; flagship; incompatible; lightly; refer; slap on the wrist/slap one's wrist; look into;  tone deaf; 55:05] I'll take that as a comment. I think the most offensive thing about that skit on 7.30 was that it was deeply unfunny, and it went on for several minutes as well. If you're going to waste everyone's precious time on a national flagship current affairs programme like that with something that isn't funny, isn't insightful, isn't speaking at any level in terms of entertainment or information, then keep it really quick. I have a slightly different view, in that I actually don't think that satire and serious television are incompatible. I think there is a forum there to take things a bit lightly. But I also think in terms of some of the speculation that government should investigate and this should be referred to people to look into and, you know, wrist should be slapped. No, I think probably the 7.30 editorial team, have hopefully listened to this, they've realised that it was very tone deaf. They should be coming out with something a lot better than that. And, you know, it's subjective ..  
Definitions:

look into:
to carry out a careful investigation of something such as a possibility, problem, or crime

slap on the wrist/slap one's wrist:
1. a hit on the wrist as a mild punishment for putting one's hands where they shouldn't be or taking something.
2.  to get a light punishment for doing something wrong.

Friday, March 27, 2015

incompatible & lightly

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Sarrah Le Marquand: [skit; flagship; incompatible; lightly; refer; slap on the wrist/slap one's wrist; look into;  tone deaf; 55:05] I'll take that as a comment. I think the most offensive thing about that skit on 7.30 was that it was deeply unfunny, and it went on for several minutes as well. If you're going to waste everyone's precious time on a national flagship current affairs programme like that with something that isn't funny, isn't insightful, isn't speaking at any level in terms of entertainment or information, then keep it really quick. I have a slightly different view, in that I actually don't think that satire and serious television are incompatible. I think there is a forum there to take things a bit lightly. But I also think in terms of some of the speculation that government should investigate and this should be referred to people to look into and, you know, wrist should be slapped. No, I think probably the 7.30 editorial team, have hopefully listened to this, they've realised that it was very tone deaf. They should be coming out with something a lot better than that. And, you know, it's subjective ..  
Definitions:

incompatible:
1. two actions, ideas, etc. that are incompatible are not acceptable or possible together because of basic differences;

lightly:
1. without exerting much pressure, force, or weight; without seriousness;
... 

signpost & kit

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

JONATHAN HOLMES: Oh, yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. And, look, I'm not a programmer but I was an executive producer of The 7.30 Report at one stage.

You don't - I don't think it is a good idea. I think you're absolutely right, Malcolm, if you're going to have satire and when that sort of program started with This Day Tonight way back in the 1960s on the ABC, they had it all the time. They got away with the most outrageous undergraduate humour you'd never get away with today. But we have the satire separately now. Shaun Micallef does it and The Chaser does it and The Roast does it. We don't put it into The 7.30 Report and if you're going to do that, you've got to really signpost it. You've got to say, well, we're going to try something new now and it's going to be a special segment and we've got this new reporter and we're going to be funny and we hope we are very funny. But you don't just slide it into the show with Leigh Sales looking embarrassed. It was just, you know, bad tactics.

SARRAH LE MARQUAND: I'll take that as a comment. I think the most offensive thing about that skit on 7.30 was that it was deeply unfunny and it went on for several minutes as well. If you're going to waste everyone's precious time on a national flagship current affairs program like that, with something that isn't funny, isn't insightful, isn't speaking at any level in terms of entertainment or information, then keep it really quick. I have a slightly different view, in that I actually don't think that satire and serious television are incompatible. I think there is a forum there to take things a bit lightly, but I also think, in terms of some of the speculation, that the Government should investigate and this should be referred to people to look into and, you know, wrists should be slapped, no, I think probably the 7.30 editorial team have hopefully listened to this. They've realised that it was very tone deaf. They should be coming out with something a lot better than that, and you know, it's subjective. I thought it was terrible.

Definitions:

signpost:
​something that gives a clue, indication, hint, or guide​

skit:
​a short piece of humorous writing or a performance that makes fun of sb/sth by copying them​

outrageous & get away with

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

JONATHAN HOLMES: Oh, yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. And, look, I'm not a programmer but I was an executive producer of The 7.30 Report at one stage.

You don't - I don't think it is a good idea. I think you're absolutely right, Malcolm, if you're going to have satire and when that sort of program started with This Day Tonight way back in the 1960s on the ABC, they had it all the time. They got away with the most outrageous undergraduate humour you'd never get away with today. But we have the satire separately now. Shaun Micallef does it and The Chaser does it and The Roast does it. We don't put it into The 7.30 Report and if you're going to do that, you've got to really signpost it. You've got to say, well, we're going to try something new now and it's going to be a special segment and we've got this new reporter and we're going to be funny and we hope we are very funny. But you don't just slide it into the show with Leigh Sales looking embarrassed. It was just, you know, bad tactics.

Definitions:

outrageous:
​very shocking and unacceptable


get away with:
​to manage to do something without being blamed or penalized or experiencing an expected bad result;​


Tuesday, March 24, 2015

ill-advised & hit the wrong note

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Jonathan Holmes: [ill-advised] Ill-advised;

Malcolm Turnbull:[hit/strike the wrong/right note; prestigious; 52:12] I thought it was - I thought it lacked taste there. And the other thing was frankly confusing, because you turned on halfway through it,  after Leigh Sales had said, this is a bit tongue in cheek or, I think she introduced it with that. You could be excused for thinking it was - you'd be puzzled as to know whether it was a satire or not, and I think, you know, where if,  again, Bruce Gyngell, you know the first face on television, great old friend of mine, Bruce said to me the problem with TV is everyone thinks they are a programmer and I've always tried to avoid giving advice on programming, so now I'll break that rule. I think the Clarke and Dawe, on the other hand, work better, because it is quite clear, you know, it's sort of cut: now we are into a satire. I think when you stick into the middle of a current affairs serious news format and the most prestigious current affairs, most widely watch current affairs program in the country, I think it hit all the wrong note, but, you know, again, that's just my opinion and ...

Definitions:

ill-advised:
not sensible; not wise; not prudent; likely to cause difficulties in the future;

hit/strike the wrong/right note:
Say or do something in a way that that is very suitable/unsuitable for a particular audience or occasion;

Monday, March 23, 2015

feeding frenzy & let off

Quotations

qanda_2014_ep42

Ben Elton: [feeding frenzy; let off; 50:50] It really was a feeding frenzy, and I think Tony Abbott has actually been let off moderately lightly not surprisingly in the commercial media, and that's not surprising because the commercial media is owned by very few individuals and we have, in this country, because we are quite a small economy. Those individuals have a very loud voice. When Gina Rinehart speaks, or when Clive Palmer speaks, or when Rupert Murdoch speaks, it's reported as news because, you know, as perceived these very significant players and they have a contribution to make, which may well be the case, but I think it's balanced very much towards them. We don't have a contrary comment from one of Gina's workers, or a journalist, et cetera. So, this is not may be ...

Definitions:

feeding frenzy:
1. a situation in which a lot of people compete with each other in an excited way because they want to get sth;
2. an occasion when a group of sharks or other fish attack sth;

let off:
1. to allow somebody to avoid something such as an unpleasant task or a punishmen;
...

Sunday, March 22, 2015

Neanderthal & hate-fest

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Ben Elton: [slip of the tongue; Neanderthal; hate-fest; ] and everyone had made their jokes. It was kind of, you know, clearly he'd either of, you know, made a silly slip of the tongue which he regretted, he was a Neanderthal whatever. People had their various opinions. But it wasn't - it did not sound like he was 82. And you said, incidentally, Malcolm, you know: oh, it's a Tony hate-fest or whatever, I did not - I wish, in a way,it hadn't got so passionate, I mean, climate change is such a passionate subject we are talking about future and we do know the spirit of Australian politics currently has calmed down a lot since the Julia hate fest, which is really a national sport in large sections of the media. Now, come on, you can't deny that.

Definitions:

Neanderthal:
1. used to describe a type of human being who used stone tools and lived in Europe during the early period of human history;
2. very old-fashioned and not wanting any change;

hate-fest -> hate-campaign -> hate-crusade
a term used to express dislike of a person to the point of hate; generally used for hating someone who is not worth wasting your time on.

Saturday, March 21, 2015

sketch & slip of the tongue

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Ben Elton:[concur; sketch] I didn't see that piece. I concur with anyone on the panel. I think generally there is an agreement that public service broadcasting provides such a broad contribution to the national life, not the least in the skills base, the drama and current affairs skills base that then feets into the commercial environment. I mean, it really, if you were to - we were to lose it, the gap would be cosmic, whatever you think about it. As to that mistake, I read all about it. Apparently they did a -  you know,  it did not sound like the greatest sketch. But I did not say it, so I'm not going to comment on it. On the whole, I think probably news and current affair should, you know, try, shouldn't go too much into satire. Maybe they made a  mistake. Having not seen it, I think, 

Ben Elton: [slip of the tongue; Neanderthal; hate-fest; ] and everyone had made their jokes. It was kind of, you know, clearly he'd either of, you know, made a silly slip of the tongue which he regretted, he was a Neanderthal whatever. People had their various opinions. But it wasn't - it did not sound like he was 82. And you said, incidentally, Malcolm, you know: oh, it's a Tony hate-fest or whatever, I did not - I wish, in a way,it hadn't got so passionate, I mean, climate change is such a passionate subject we are talking about future and we do know the spirit of Australian politics currently has calmed down a lot since the Julia hate fest, which is really a national sport in large sections of the media. Now, come on, you can't deny that.

Definitions:

sketch:
1. a short report or story that gives only basic details about sth;
2. ... 

slip of the tongue:
an accidental and usually trivial mistake in speaking;

Friday, March 20, 2015

tongue in cheek & concur

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Kavitha Gowrishankar: [satire;bulletin; tongue in cheek;48:40] Yeah, thanks Tony. My question is completely different. Does the panel think that humor and satire should be part of important news bulletins. We know the tongue in cheek humor in programs like Media Watch that we all really love. But does that have a place in programs like The 7:30 Report which was really not well received, so do you think Aunty got wrong? 


Ben Elton:[concur; sketch] I didn't see that piece. I concur with anyone on the panel. I think generally there is an agreement that public service broadcasting provides such a broad contribution to the national life, not the least in the skills base, the drama and current affairs skills base that then feets into the commercial environment. I mean, it really, if you were to - we were to lose it, the gap would be cosmic, whatever you think about it. As to that mistake, I read all about it. Apparently they did a -  you know,  it did not sound like the greatest sketch. But I did not say it, so I'm not going to comment on it. On the whole, I think probably news and current affair should, you know, try, shouldn't go too much into satire. Maybe they made a  mistake. Having not seen it, I think, 


Definitions:

tongue in cheek:
1. spoken with gentle irony and meant as a joke;
2. intended to be humorous and not meant seriously;

concur:
1. to have the same opinion as somebody else, or reach agreement independently on a specific point;
2. ...


Thursday, March 19, 2015

satire & bulletin

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Kavitha Gowrishankar: [satire;bulletin; tongue in cheek;48:40] Yeah, thanks Tony. My question is completely different. Does the panel think that humor and satire should be part of important news bulletins. We know the tongue in cheek humor in programs like Media Watch that we all really love. But does that have a place in programs like The 7:30 Report which was really not well received, so do you think Aunty got wrong? 

Definitions:
satire:
the use of humour to criticize someone or something and make them seem silly;

bulletin:
1. a short news report on the radio or television;
2. an official statement about sth important;
3. a printed report that gives news about an organization or a group;

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

sort of & feet of clay

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Malcolm Turnbull: [rhetorically; kick up a fuss; grumpy; sort of; feet of clay;  47:22]Oh, I don't think. Maybe some do rhetorically. But there is absolutely, you know, bipartisan support for the ABC as an institution there is nobody who seriously suggests it should be closed or sold. I mean, but I tell you the last people who would want it to be sold would be the commercial broadcasters, I mean, they're kicking up a fuss at suggestion that SBS might be be able to sell a little bit more advertising. You can imagine what they'd think about ABC, Jonathan having a - Roger, having a, you know, advertising. So, look the ABC is part of landscape, it is a beloved part of the landscape. One of the reasons people get, frankly, so grumpy about perceived bias and, you know, low standards or lower than they like standards in the ABC is because they have such high expectations of it. And I've said this to Mark Scott several times, you know, you should actually take a lot of this criticism as a compliment. Because it shows people want to expect the ABC to be right up there, you know, better than anyone else. When it sort of becomes human and shows that it does have feet of clay, they get very disappointed. 

Definitions:

sort of:
1. similar, but not exactly the same;
2. somewhat;

feet of clay:
1. a weakness or hidden flaw in the character of a greatly admired or respected person;
2. any unexpected or critical fault;

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

kick up a fuss & grumpy

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Malcolm Turnbull: [rhetorically; kick up a fuss; grumpy; sort of; feet of clay;  47:22]Oh, I don't think. Maybe some do rhetorically. But there is absolutely, you know, bipartisan support for the ABC as an institution there is nobody who seriously suggests it should be closed or sold. I mean, but I tell you the last people who would want it to be sold would be the commercial broadcasters, I mean, they're kicking up a fuss at suggestion that SBS might be be able to sell a little bit more advertising. You can imagine what they'd think about ABC, Jonathan having a - Roger, having a, you know, advertising. So, look the ABC is part of landscape, it is a beloved part of the landscape. One of the reasons people get, frankly, so grumpy about perceived bias and, you know, low standards or lower than they like standards in the ABC is because they have such high expectations of it. And I've said this to Mark Scott several times, you know, you should actually take a lot of this criticism as a compliment. Because it shows people want to expect the ABC to be right up there, you know, better than anyone else. When it sort of becomes human and shows that it does have feet of clay, they get very disappointed. 

Definitions:

kick up a fuss/row/stink/storm:
to complain loudly about sth;

grumpy:
bad-tempered;

Monday, March 16, 2015

navel-gazing & rhetorically

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Sarrah Le Marquand: [abolition;beholder; bleeding heart;lefty/leftie; feminazi; navel-gazing; 46:08] Yeah, and there is certainly a role for a public broadcast. I would absolutely never call for the abolition of the ABC. I'd be really sad to see that happen. As I said earlier, my only point as a working journalist in a commercial newsroom, is that there's certainly fat to be trimmed. I don't take any joy in saying that. I have a great respect for so many people at the ABC and I would hate to see people lose their jobs just as I hate to have seen so many fabulous people in the commercial media lose their jobs. And I choose not to weigh into the whole partisan and bias thing, because in my experience generally in the eye of the beholder. Trust me, you know, what Malcolm was saying before about his inbox and the ABC. I have written so many pieces where - if you could go online and read the comments at the end and the first one will be: oh, you're just a, you know, a mouthpiece for the right wing media, and then the next person goes just another bleeding heart lefty feminazi. Honestly, I have had those same reactions to the same piece. So, I just choose not to buy into that sort of navel-gazing, you're left or right. Most of the media is doing a pretty good job, and I just think that that's a waste of everyone's time and energy.


Malcolm Turnbull: [rhetorically; kick up a fuss; grumpy; sort of; feet of clay;  47:22]Oh, I don't think. Maybe some do rhetorically. But there is absolutely, you know, bipartisan support for the ABC as an institution there is nobody who seriously suggests it should be closed or sold. I mean, but I tell you the last people who would want it to be sold would be the commercial broadcasters, I mean, they're kicking up a fuss at suggestion that SBS might be be able to sell a little bit more advertising. You can imagine what they'd think about ABC, Jonathan having a - Roger, having a, you know, advertising. So, look the ABC is part of landscape, it is a beloved part of the landscape. One of the reasons people get, frankly, so grumpy about perceived bias and, you know, low standards or lower than they like standards in the ABC is because they have such high expectations of it. And I've said this to Mark Scott several times, you know, you should actually take a lot of this criticism as a compliment. Because it shows people want to expect the ABC to be right up there, you know, better than anyone else. When it sort of becomes human and shows that it does have feet of clay, they get very disappointed. 

Definitions:
navel-gazing:
1. the act of spending a lot of time thinking about your own problems, or one issue, but not doing anything about them;
2. concentration on self-analysis and personal concerns in a way that excludes considering broader issues or taking practical action;

rhetorically:
1. in a way that expects or wants no answer; 
2. using or relating to rhetoric

Sunday, March 15, 2015

lefty/leftie & feminazi

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Sarrah Le Marquand: [abolition;beholder; bleeding heart;lefty/leftie; feminazi; navel-gazing; 46:08] Yeah, and there is certainly a role for a public broadcast. I would absolutely never call for the abolition of the ABC. I'd be really sad to see that happen. As I said earlier, my only point as a working journalist in a commercial newsroom, is that there's certainly fat to be trimmed. I don't take any joy in saying that. I have a great respect for so many people at the ABC and I would hate to see people lose their jobs just as I hate to have seen so many fabulous people in the commercial media lose their jobs. And I choose not to weigh into the whole partisan and bias thing, because in my experience generally in the eye of the beholder. Trust me, you know, what Malcolm was saying before about his inbox and the ABC. I have written so many pieces where - if you could go online and read the comments at the end and the first one will be: oh, you're just a, you know, a mouthpiece for the right wing media, and then the next person goes just another bleeding heart lefty feminazi. Honestly, I have had those same reactions to the same piece. So, I just choose not to buy into that sort of navel-gazing, you're left or right. Most of the media is doing a pretty good job, and I just think that that's a waste of everyone's time and energy.

Definitions:
lefty/leftie:
1. somebody with left-wing beliefs;
2. somebody who is left-handed;

feminazi:
an offensive term for somebody who is thought to uphold feminist ideas to what is considered an extreme and unreasonable extent.

Saturday, March 14, 2015

beholder & bleeding heart

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Sarrah Le Marquand: [abolition;beholder; bleeding heart;lefty/leftie; feminazi; navel-gazing; 46:08] Yeah, and there is certainly a role for a public broadcast. I would absolutely never call for the abolition of the ABC. I'd be really sad to see that happen. As I said earlier, my only point as a working journalist in a commercial newsroom, is that there's certainly fat to be trimmed. I don't take any joy in saying that. I have a great respect for so many people at the ABC and I would hate to see people lose their jobs just as I hate to have seen so many fabulous people in the commercial media lose their jobs. And I choose not to weigh into the whole partisan and bias thing, because in my experience generally in the eye of the beholder. Trust me, you know, what Malcolm was saying before about his inbox and the ABC. I have written so many pieces where - if you could go online and read the comments at the end and the first one will be: oh, you're just a, you know, a mouthpiece for the right wing media, and then the next person goes just another bleeding heart lefty feminazi. Honestly, I have had those same reactions to the same piece. So, I just choose not to buy into that sort of navel-gazing, you're left or right. Most of the media is doing a pretty good job, and I just think that that's a waste of everyone's time and energy.

Definitions:
beholder:
A beholder is an observer: someone who gains awareness of things through the senses, especially sight. 

bleeding heart:
a person who is too kind and sympathetic towards people that other people think do not deserve kindness;

Friday, March 13, 2015

damn & abolition

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Jonathan Holmes: [proliferation; vociferous; dictate; sack; bloody well; damn; 44:26]Look. Of course, you can argue that the ABC is an unnecessary of charging on the public purse. Especially now that we have such a proliferation of media. It was started in very different climate, very different media situation. It's a perfectly logical argument to say we don't need it, users should pay. But as every politician in this country knows, it's not a winning argument with the voters. The ABC is a very popular institution in this country. One of the reasons it's popular is because, in fact, commercial organisations are allowed to be partisan and they are partisan, much more partisan, I would believe than the ABC ever is. Even those who are most vociferous in their attacks on the ABC is partiality on one side or the other, have to accept that at least, most of us honestly really do try to keep our personal opinions off it, and we don't have a proprietor that's dictating. So, that's - but the main advantage of the ABC at the moment I would argue is precisely that commercial operations, the business models they've been - were very successful for a hundred years are in deep trouble, and journalists are being sacked by the hundreds and even the thousands. It's an island of relative security. We have to bloody well earn it, I say We - I'm not there any more, but the ABC journalists should work damn hard just as their colleagues in commercial are working very hard. They should be holding governments to account. They should be doing all those public jobs for the public money and taking that responsibility really seriously. And I promise you most of them do. 

Sarrah Le Marquand: [abolition;beholder; bleeding heart;lefty/leftie; feminazi; navel-gazing; 46:08] Yeah, and there is certainly a role for a public broadcast. I would absolutely never call for the abolition of the ABC. I'd be really sad to see that happen. As I said earlier, my only point as a working journalist in a commercial newsroom, is that there's certainly fat to be trimmed. I don't take any joy in saying that. I have a great respect for so many people at the ABC and I would hate to see people lose their jobs just as I hate to have seen so many fabulous people in the commercial media lose their jobs. And I choose not to weigh into the whole partisan and bias thing, because in my experience generally in the eye of the beholder. Trust me, you know, what Malcolm was saying before about his inbox and the ABC. I have written so many pieces where - if you could go online and read the comments at the end and the first one will be: oh, you're just a, you know, a mouthpiece for the right wing media, and then the next person goes just another bleeding hard lefty feminazi. Honestly, I have had those same reactions to the same piece. So, I just choose not to buy into that sort of navel-gazing, you're left or right. Most of the media is doing a pretty good job, and I just think that that's a waste of everyone's time and energy.

Definitions:
damn:
used for emphasizing what you are saying, especially when you are annoyed about something.

abolition:
to officially end a law, a system or an institution;

Thursday, March 12, 2015

sack & bloody well

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Jonathan Holmes: [proliferation; vociferous; dictate; sack; bloody well; damn; 44:26]Look. Of course, you can argue that the ABC is an unnecessary of charging on the public purse. Especially now that we have such a proliferation of media. It was started in very different climate, very different media situation. It's a perfectly logical argument to say we don't need it, users should pay. But as every politician in this country knows, it's not a winning argument with the voters. The ABC is a very popular institution in this country. One of the reasons it's popular is because, in fact, commercial organisations are allowed to be partisan and they are partisan, much more partisan, I would believe than the ABC ever is. Even those who are most vociferous in their attacks on the ABC is partiality on one side or the other, have to accept that at least, most of us honestly really do try to keep our personal opinions off it, and we don't have a proprietor that's dictating. So, that's - but the main advantage of the ABC at the moment I would argue is precisely that commercial operations, the business models they've been - were very successful for a hundred years are in deep trouble, and journalists are being sacked by the hundreds and even the thousands. It's an island of relative security. We have to bloody well earn it, I say We - I'm not there any more, but the ABC journalists should work damn hard just as their colleagues in commercial are working very hard. They should be holding governments to account. They should be doing all those public jobs for the public money and taking that responsibility really seriously. And I promise you most of them do. 

Definitions:
sack:
1. to dismiss sb from a job.
...

bloody well:
used to show anger or irritation when contradicting something;

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

vociferous & dictate

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Jonathan Holmes: [proliferation; vociferous; dictate; sack; bloody well; damn; 44:26]Look. Of course, you can argue that the ABC is an unnecessary of charging on the public purse. Especially now that we have such a proliferation of media. It was started in very different climate, very different media situation. It's a perfectly logical argument to say we don't need it, users should pay. But as every politician in this country knows, it's not a winning argument with the voters. The ABC is a very popular institution in this country. One of the reasons it's popular is because, in fact, commercial organisations are allowed to be partisan and they are partisan, much more partisan, I would believe than the ABC ever is. Even those who are most vociferous in their attacks on the ABC is partiality on one side or the other, have to accept that at least, most of us honestly really do try to keep our personal opinions off it, and we don't have a proprietor that's dictating. So, that's - but the main advantage of the ABC at the moment I would argue is precisely that commercial operations, the business models they've been - were very successful for a hundred years are in deep trouble, and journalists are being sacked by the hundreds and even the thousands. It's an island of relative security. We have to bloody well earn it, I say We - I'm not there any more, but the ABC journalists should work damn hard just as their colleagues in commercial are working very hard. They should be holding governments to account. They should be doing all those public jobs for the public money and taking that responsibility really seriously. And I promise you most of them do. 

Definitions:
vociferous:
expressing your opinions or feelings in a loud and confident way;

dictate:
to control or influence how sth happens.

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

regression & proliferation

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Roger Colman: [ partisanship; leg; prime time; regression; 43:11] I've got a question for the three media panellists there, one private, public and the man in the middle. The key question seems to be whether the ABC or government should own media at all, and that's the core of the argument. You'll never settle bias and partisanship unless you get out of the public hands and all taxpayers don't pay. And moving to the second leg of the issues that the three panellists in the media side here should address is if the New Zealand government can have a - two government owned television stations, advertisers supported, and given the demographic premium on prime time for the ABC and SBS, a user-pay principle should apply on regression grounds on the viewers. I mean, during a typical month only 59% Australians watch the ABC versus 88 or 86% for private. It's not even fulfilling a universal obligation at the moment in terms of penetration. So I want to hear from three media panellists, whether the government should own it? how it should be funded and should be public funded or should be funded by the viewer? 

Jonathan Holmes: [proliferation; vociferous; dictate; sack; bloody well; damn; 44:26]Look. Of course, you can argue that the ABC is an unnecessary of charging on the public purse. Especially now that we have such a proliferation of media. It was started in very different climate, very different media situation. It's a perfectly logical argument to say we don't need it, users should pay. But as every politician in this country knows, it's not a winning argument with the voters. The ABC is a very popular institution in this country. One of the reasons it's popular is because, in fact, commercial organisations are allowed to be partisan and they are partisan, much more partisan, I would believe than the ABC ever is. Even those who are most vociferous in their attacks on the ABC is partiality on one side or the other, have to accept that at least, most of us honestly really do try to keep our personal opinions off it, and we don't have a proprietor that's dictating. So, that's - but the main advantage of the ABC at the moment I would argue is precisely that commercial operations, the business models they've been - were very successful for a hundred years are in deep trouble, and journalists are being sacked by the hundreds and even the thousands. It's an island of relative security. We have to bloody well earn it, I say We - I'm not there any more, but the ABC journalists should work damn hard just as their colleagues in commercial are working very hard. They should be holding governments to account. They should be doing all those public jobs for the public money and taking that responsibility really seriously. And I promise you most of them do. 

Definitions:

regression:
the process of going back to an earlier or less advanced form or state;

proliferation:
1. the sudden increase in the number or amount of sth;
2. a large number of a particular thing

Monday, March 9, 2015

leg & prime time

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Roger Colman: [ partisanship; leg; prime time; regression; 43:11] I've got a question for the three media panellists there, one private, public and the man in the middle. The key question seems to be whether the ABC or government should own media at all, and that's the core of the argument. You'll never settle bias and partisanship unless you get out of the public hands and all taxpayers don't pay. And moving to the second leg of the issues that the three panellists in the media side here should address is if the New Zealand government can have a - two government owned television stations, advertisers supported, and given the demographic premium on prime time for the ABC and SBS, a user-pay principle should apply on regression grounds on the viewers. I mean, during a typical month only 59% Australians watch the ABC versus 88 or 86% for private. It's not even fulfilling a universal obligation at the moment in terms of penetration. So I want to hear from three media panellists, whether the government should own it? how it should be funded and should be public funded or should be funded by the viewer? 

Definitions:
​leg:
1. one of several stages, events, or games that is part of a larger competition but is treated independently of the otherparts and has its own winner;
2. a part of journey that is separated from other parts by a period of rest or by a change in direction or the manner of travel;

prime time:
the time when the greatest number of people are watching television or listening to the radio;

Sunday, March 8, 2015

unilaterally & partisanship

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Malcolm Turnbull:[unilaterally 42:40] If you accept that thesis, then you've got to assume that he'd decided unilaterally to overrule and contradict what I'd been saying as his shadow Communications Minister ...

Roger Colman: [ partisanship; leg; prime time; regression; 43:11] I've got a question for the three media panellists there, one private, public and the man in the middle. The key question seems to be whether the ABC or government should own media at all, and that's the core of the argument. You'll never settle bias and partisanship unless you get out of the public hands and all taxpayers don't pay. And moving to the second leg of the issues that the three panellists in the media side here should address is if the New Zealand government can have a - two government owned television stations, advertisers supported, and given the demographic premium on prime time for the ABC and SBS, a user-pay principle should apply on regression grounds on the viewers. I mean, during a typical month only 59% Australians watch the ABC versus 88 or 86% for private. It's not even fulfilling a universal obligation at the moment in terms of penetration. So I want to hear from three media panellists, whether the government should own it? how it should be funded and should be public funded or should be funded by the viewer? 

Definitions:

unilaterally;
unilateral:
done by one member of a group or an organization without the agreement of the other members.

partisanship:
prejudice in favour of a particular cause, group, party;

Saturday, March 7, 2015

slashing & be looking to do sth

Quotations:

qanda_2014_ep42

Malcolm Turnbull: [slashing 42:02]No, no, prior the election, I said on a number of occasions, I think possibly on this show, certainly on Lateline, that while we weren't planning to make, you know, massive, slashing cuts to the ABC, to cut their programming resources, as some people were urging us to do so. 

Malcolm Turnbull: [be looking to do sth; 42:19]We would be looking to make savings and cut waste, right across government and ABC and SBS will not be exempt. Now, I think, when Tony made that remark, he was speaking in the context of that. I don't think he was intending to ...

Definitions:

slashing:
1. to reduce sth by a large amount;
2. to make a long cut with a sharp object, especially in a violent way;

be looking to do sth:
to try to find ways of doing sth;

Friday, March 6, 2015

statutory & nonetheless

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42

Malcolm: [the/a curate's egg; journalism; statutory; nonetheless 41:08] Look, I think it's like the curate's egg, Tony. I think it's good in part, I think there are, you know, but, I'm not, I don't, the fact is that journalism is a very subjective business, and, you know, no one would be - Look, the ABC has got a statutory obligation to be accurate and impartial. That's in section 8 of the ABC Act. But it is according to the accepted standards of objective journalism - Jonathan might explain what they are, but, nonetheless, that's in the acts. So, there is an absolute obligation and the ABC has to remember this, that while Sarrah's paper or any other channel nine or whatever,

Definitions:

statutory:
fixed by law; that must be done by law.

nonetheless:
despite this fact.

Thursday, March 5, 2015

the curate's egg & journalism

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42

Malcolm: [the/a curate's egg; journalism; statutory; nonetheless 41:08] Look, I think it's like the curate's egg, Tony. I think it's good in part, I think there are, you know, but, I'm not, I don't, the fact is that journalism is a very subjective business, and, you know, no one would be - Look, the ABC has got a statutory obligation to be accurate and impartial. That's in section 8 of the ABC Act. But it is according to the accepted standards of objective journalism - Jonathan might explain what they are, but, nonetheless, that's in the acts. So, there is an absolute obligation and the ABC has to remember this, that while Sarrah's paper or any other channel nine or whatever,

Definitions:

the/a curate's egg:
something that has some good parts and some bad ones;

curate:
an assistant to a vicar (a priest, who is in charge of the church or churches in a particular area)

journalism:
the work of collecting and writing news stories for newspapers, magazines, radio or television;

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

run/go off on a tangent & unbiased

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42

Malcolm Turnbull: [run/go off on a tangent] You've clearly made a good case, because you are no longer talking the ABC. You've run off on a tangent about something else.

Glen Mills: [unbiased; 39:57] The ABC is loved and revered by young and all, an institution we've come to rely on and trust. We don't regard it as either being right or left wing, but as a reliable source of unbiased, factual information. So can you please explain the reasoning behind the government's massive financial cuts to what we regard as our only source of intelligent, unbiased information and outstanding Australian drama.

Definitions:

run/go off on a tangent:
to suddenly start doing, discussing, or thinking about something completely different;

unbiased:
fair and not influenced by your own or sb else's opinions, desires, etc. 

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

mendacious & multinational

Quotations:
qanda_2015_ep42

Ben Elton: [mendacious] What are we going to have Tony Abbott-solutely mendacious? What's going to be the ... 

Ben Elton: [wittily; multinational; accountancy; 39:13]But, but, Malcolm as for you're talking about the, you know, very wittily about how obvious it is that the ABC is a wasteful organization. I don't really know. But this government doesn't even apparently be able to claim tax off the various multinationals that are hoarding all their the money overseas and refusing pay their way within the public. So maybe a bit of accountancy, maybe we could make some money by taxing some of the people, some of whom fund your party, whilst they put all their money oversea.

Definitions:
mendacious:
not telling the truth.

multinational:
operating or having investments in several countries.

Monday, March 2, 2015

newsroom & conviction

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42

Sarrah Le Marquand: [newsroom; conviction; 37:48] Well, personally, in an ideal world, I genuinely believe that. I wish that no media organization had to undergo any cuts. But, yes, as a working journalist in a commercial newsroom, the cost cutting that every commercial company across this country - newspapers, magazines, television and radio - has undergone in the past three years has been in brutal, absolutely brutal, and yet, despite that, is expected to produce not just the same level content, but more content than ever before and maintain high standards, breaking exclusives and holding powers to be - to account, so, while I sympathize with the defenders of the ABC, and I admire their conviction they would do well to remember that there are thousands and thousands of journalists working in the commercial media. They could also do with a little bit of their concern and conviction. And I simply from that point of view, I just can't accept that the ABC is only media company in Australia, one of the precious few in the world that remains immune to the cost cutting that's gone on. 

Definitions:

newsroom:
the area in a newspaper office or broadcasting studio where news is written.

conviction:
1. the feeling or appearance of believing sth strongly and of being sure about it ...

Sunday, March 1, 2015

arcane & buy into

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42

Tony Jones: [arcane; buy into] Well, let's actually hear. Well, let's hear from Sarrah Le Marquand. I mean, what do you say, listening to this argument. Is it too arcane for words? Will the Daily Telegraph be buying into it?

Definitions:
arcane:
secret and mysterious and therefore difficult to understand.

buy into:
to accept or believe in a proposition or idea.