Saturday, February 28, 2015

go figure & admittedly

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42

Jonathan Holmes:[go figure; admittedly; 37:20] It was owned, at the time, by Frank Lowy. He was one of the best businessmen in the country. So, you know, go figure. But anyway, there had - have been efficiencies. Anyone who works at the ABC over the last decade, admittedly people who work in commercial organisation have had it much tougher. No one is denying that.

Definitions:

go figure:
used to indicate that you think a situation you have described is odd or hard to comprehend.

admittedly:
used, especially at the beginning of a sentence, when you are accepting sth is true.

profligate & Jatz

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42

Jonathan Holmes: [profligate 37:06] Well, I tell what I will say. I worked for Channel 10 for a while. It was the most unbelievably profligate organization. This was a long time ago.  I admit to you. Unbelievable.

Ben Elton: [Jatz] I tell you what ... hospitality it was one box of Jatz. Let's be honest, back stage ...

Definitions:
profligate:
using moneying, time, materials, etc. in a careless way.

Jatz:
a round savoury crisp cracker, lightly salted, also available in a cracked pepper flavoured variety.

Thursday, February 26, 2015

under wraps & fair dinkum

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42

Jonathan Holmes: [under wraps 36:34] Every report - every time we haven't seen the Peter Lewis's report. It's still under wraps. Every other report that has been looking at ABC's efficiency has come back to governments that were longing to hear precisely what you've just said in a nice, scornful report from accountants saying what a wasteful place it is and they've come back and they've said: no. It's actually very good value for money.

Malcolm Turnbull: [fair dinkum] Are you fair dinkum? 

Definitions:
under wraps:
concealed or secret;

fair dinkum:
used to emphasize that sth is genuine or true, or to ask whether it is;

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

subsidise & implementation

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42

Malcolm Turnbull: [subsidise] you know, the Australian network contract, and the reason for that is that that was a contract between the Department of Foreign Affairs and the ABC, and obviously the ABC loses the revenue from that contract, but they also lose the cost, because it was not - unless the ABC was cost, you know, making a profit out of  it and was cross-subsidised which they always said it wasn't.

Malcolm Turnbull: [implementation 35:35] I'm talking about 5% on - I say around 5%. It's actually depending on whether you include implementation cost or not.

Definitions:
subsidise:
to give money to sb or an organization to help pay for sth; to give a subsidy;

implementation:
the process of implementing something;

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

demographic & legitimate

Quotations:
qanda_2015_42

Malcolm Turnbull: [government-wide; exempt; back-office; overhead; put it another way; CFO; collaboratively; demographic; legitimate 31:01]Well, the answer to your question is no. The savings measures that have been partially set out the budget, and which are - well, I'll be announcing not tomorrow as media Watch said, but later in the week in great detail - are not punitive measures at all. They are relatively modest savings, relative to the budgets or budget of ABC and SBS. They are part of a government-wide savings exercise, because you know we've got a problem with the budget and what's the problem? We're spending more than we're receiving in  revenue. So we've got to raise some more money and we've got to spend less. And that, there are - there's no reason for the ABC and SBS to be exempt from that. Now, I've gone to some considerable pains to ensure that the ABC - in particular, I just talk about the ABC, although these comments apply, to a lesser extent, to the SBS - where we've gone to considerable pains to ensure the ABC is will able to deliver these savings without cutting into the resources available for programming. In other words, through cutting what you might call back-office costs, administrative overhead, you know, waste, you know you can put it another way. And we've got a study, we did study earlier in the year, headed up by Peter Lewis who had been the CFO of the Seven Network for many years, real, someone really understood the numbers in the television business obviously, and we've been working very collaboratively with the ABC management on this. Now, I regret to say that the ABC management has from time to time in seeking to make programming changes, it wants to make for its own programming reasons; has sought to blame them on the government, and me in particular that is simply no right, and that's why I wrote that blog that was referred to earlier on Media Watch, you know, about the sort of holding Peppa Pig to ransom, then indeed, even worse than Peppa Pig holding Tony Jones to ransom. And you know, the truth is that there was a view held in the management here that Lateline should be taken off ABC 1 because it was felt that its audience was appealing to an old demographic, was too late at night they were mostly in bed, and it was better to have a Lateline-type show on ABC 24 at 10pm and at 10pm every night, because as you know, Lateline sometimes it's 10:35, sometimes it's 10:28. You never quite know when it is starting. Now, that's - look, I'm not a programmer. I mean, everyone think they're a programmer. I know I'm not. That's a legitimate point of view to take. It had nothing to do with the savings measures arising out of this exercise.

Definitions:
demographic:
1. the characteristics of a human population or part of it, especially its size, growth, density, distribution, and statistics regarding birth, marriage, disease, and death;
2. a group of people that a company wants to sell its product to;

legitimate:
1. complying with the law, or having official status defined by law;
2. complying with recognized rules, standards, or traditions;
3. well reasoned and sincere;

Monday, February 23, 2015

CFO & collaboratively

Quotations:
qanda_2015_42

Malcolm Turnbull: [government-wide; exempt; back-office; overhead; put it another way; CFO; collaboratively; demographic; legitimate 31:01]Well, the answer to your question is no. The savings measures that have been partially set out the budget, and which are - well, I'll be announcing not tomorrow as media Watch said, but later in the week in great detail - are not punitive measures at all. They are relatively modest savings, relative to the budgets or budget of ABC and SBS. They are part of a government-wide savings exercise, because you know we've got a problem with the budget and what's the problem? We're spending more than we're receiving in  revenue. So we've got to raise some more money and we've got to spend less. And that, there are - there's no reason for the ABC and SBS to be exempt from that. Now, I've gone to some considerable pains to ensure that the ABC - in particular, I just talk about the ABC, although these comments apply, to a lesser extent, to the SBS - where we've gone to considerable pains to ensure the ABC is will able to deliver these savings without cutting into the resources available for programming. In other words, through cutting what you might call back-office costs, administrative overhead, you know, waste, you know you can put it another way. And we've got a study, we did study earlier in the year, headed up by Peter Lewis who had been the CFO of the Seven Network for many years, real, someone really understood the numbers in the television business obviously, and we've been working very collaboratively with the ABC management on this. Now, I regret to say that the ABC management has from time to time in seeking to make programming changes, it wants to make for its own programming reasons; has sought to blame them on the government, and me in particular that is simply no right, and that's why I wrote that blog that was referred to earlier on Media Watch, you know, about the sort of holding Peppa Pig to ransom, then indeed, even worse than Peppa Pig holding Tony Jones to ransom. And you know, the truth is that there was a view held in the management here that Lateline should be taken off ABC 1 because it was felt that its audience was appealing to an old demographic, was too late at night they were mostly in bed, and it was better to have a Lateline-type show on ABC 24 at 10pm and at 10pm every night, because as you know, Lateline sometimes it's 10:35, sometimes it's 10:28. You never quite know when it is starting. Now, that's - look, I'm not a programmer. I mean, everyone think they're a programmer. I know I'm not. That's a legitimate point of view to take. It had nothing to do with the savings measures arising out of this exercise.

Definitions:
CFO:
chief financial officer;

collaboratively:
collaborative:
involving, or done by, several people or groups of people working together;

Sunday, February 22, 2015

overhead & put it another way

Quotations:
qanda_2015_42

Malcolm Turnbull: [government-wide; exempt; back-office; overhead; put it another way; CFO; collaboratively; demographic; legitimate 31:01]Well, the answer to your question is no. The savings measures that have been partially set out the budget, and which are - well, I'll be announcing not tomorrow as media Watch said, but later in the week in great detail - are not punitive measures at all. They are relatively modest savings, relative to the budgets or budget of ABC and SBS. They are part of a government-wide savings exercise, because you know we've got a problem with the budget and what's the problem? We're spending more than we're receiving in  revenue. So we've got to raise some more money and we've got to spend less. And that, there are - there's no reason for the ABC and SBS to be exempt from that. Now, I've gone to some considerable pains to ensure that the ABC - in particular, I just talk about the ABC, although these comments apply, to a lesser extent, to the SBS - where we've gone to considerable pains to ensure the ABC is will able to deliver these savings without cutting into the resources available for programming. In other words, through cutting what you might call back-office costs, administrative overhead, you know, waste, you know you can put it another way. And we've got a study, we did study earlier in the year, headed up by Peter Lewis who had been the CFO of the Seven Network for many years, real, someone really understood the numbers in the television business obviously, and we've been working very collaboratively with the ABC management on this. Now, I regret to say that the ABC management has from time to time in seeking to make programming changes, it wants to make for its own programming reasons; has sought to blame them on the government, and me in particular that is simply no right, and that's why I wrote that blog that was referred to earlier on Media Watch, you know, about the sort of holding Peppa Pig to ransom, then indeed, even worse than Peppa Pig holding Tony Jones to ransom. And you know, the truth is that there was a view held in the management here that Lateline should be taken off ABC 1 because it was felt that its audience was appealing to an old demographic, was too late at night they were mostly in bed, and it was better to have a Lateline-type show on ABC 24 at 10pm and at 10pm every night, because as you know, Lateline sometimes it's 10:35, sometimes it's 10:28. You never quite know when it is starting. Now, that's - look, I'm not a programmer. I mean, everyone think they're a programmer. I know I'm not. That's a legitimate point of view to take. It had nothing to do with the savings measures arising out of this exercise.

Definitions:
overhead:
1. the general recurring costs of running a business, excluding the costs labor and materials, e.g. rent, maintenance, and utilities;
...

(to) put it another way:
used when you are going to explain something in a different way in order to make it easier to understand.

Saturday, February 21, 2015

exempt & back-office

Quotations:
qanda_2015_42

Malcolm Turnbull: [government-wide; exempt; back-office; overhead; put it another way; CFO; collaboratively; demographic; legitimate 31:01]Well, the answer to your question is no. The savings measures that have been partially set out the budget, and which are - well, I'll be announcing not tomorrow as media Watch said, but later in the week in great detail - are not punitive measures at all. They are relatively modest savings, relative to the budgets or budget of ABC and SBS. They are part of a government-wide savings exercise, because you know we've got a problem with the budget and what's the problem? We're spending more than we're receiving in  revenue. So we've got to raise some more money and we've got to spend less. And that, there are - there's no reason for the ABC and SBS to be exempt from that. Now, I've gone to some considerable pains to ensure that the ABC - in particular, I just talk about the ABC, although these comments apply, to a lesser extent, to the SBS - where we've gone to considerable pains to ensure the ABC is will able to deliver these savings without cutting into the resources available for programming. In other words, through cutting what you might call back-office costs, administrative overhead, you know, waste, you know you can put it another way. And we've got a study, we did study earlier in the year, headed up by Peter Lewis who had been the CFO of the Seven Network for many years, real, someone really understood the numbers in the television business obviously, and we've been working very collaboratively with the ABC management on this. Now, I regret to say that the ABC management has from time to time in seeking to make programming changes, it wants to make for its own programming reasons; has sought to blame them on the government, and me in particular that is simply no right, and that's why I wrote that blog that was referred to earlier on Media Watch, you know, about the sort of holding Peppa Pig to ransom, then indeed, even worse than Peppa Pig holding Tony Jones to ransom. And you know, the truth is that there was a view held in the management here that Lateline should be taken off ABC 1 because it was felt that its audience was appealing to an old demographic, was too late at night they were mostly in bed, and it was better to have a Lateline-type show on ABC 24 at 10pm and at 10pm every night, because as you know, Lateline sometimes it's 10:35, sometimes it's 10:28. You never quite know when it is starting. Now, that's - look, I'm not a programmer. I mean, everyone think they're a programmer. I know I'm not. That's a legitimate point of view to take. It had nothing to do with the savings measures arising out of this exercise.

Definitions:
exempt:
if sb/sth is exempt from sth, they are not affected by it, do not have to do it, pay it, etc.

back-office:
the part of a business company which does not deal directly with the public;

Friday, February 20, 2015

prowess & government-wide

Quotations:
qanda_2015_42

Sharon Talbot: [in the order of; punitive; prowess; a range of 30:31]Thanks, Tony. My question is for Malcolm Turnbull. Malcolm, are the proposed cuts of more than $300 million to the ABC and SBS which will lead to approximately- to an approximate loss of jobs in the order of 500? Is it a punitive measure aimed at prowess of the ABC and SBS in keeping the government accountable on a range of issues?

Malcolm Turnbull: [government-wide:Affecting or involving all areas and departments of government; exempt; back-office; overhead; put it another way; CFO; collaboratively; demographic; legitimate 31:01]Well, the answer to your question is no. The savings measures that have been partially set out the budget, and which are - well, I'll be announcing not tomorrow as media Watch said, but later in the week in great detail - are not punitive measures at all. They are relatively modest savings, relative to the budgets or budget of ABC and SBS. They are part of a government-wide savings exercise, because you know we've got a problem with the budget and what's the problem? We're spending more than we're receiving in  revenue. So we've got to raise some more money and we've got to spend less. And that, there are - there's no reason for the ABC and SBS to be exempt from that. Now, I've gone to some considerable pains to ensure that the ABC - in particular, I just talk about the ABC, although these comments apply, to a lesser extent, to the SBS - where we've gone to considerable pains to ensure the ABC is will able to deliver these savings without cutting into the resources available for programming. In other words, through cutting what you might call back-office costs, administrative overhead, you know, waste, you know you can put it another way. And we've got a study, we did study earlier in the year, headed up by Peter Lewis who had been the CFO of the Seven Network for many years, real, someone really understood the numbers in the television business obviously, and we've been working very collaboratively with the ABC management on this. Now, I regret to say that the ABC management has from time to time in seeking to make programming changes, it wants to make for its own programming reasons; has sought to blame them on the government, and me in particular that is simply no right, and that's why I wrote that blog that was referred to earlier on Media Watch, you know, about the sort of holding Peppa Pig to ransom, then indeed, even worse than Peppa Pig holding Tony Jones to ransom. And you know, the truth is that there was a view held in the management here that Lateline should be taken off ABC 1 because it was felt that its audience was appealing to an old demographic, was too late at night they were mostly in bed, and it was better to have a Lateline-type show on ABC 24 at 10pm and at 10pm every night, because as you know, Lateline sometimes it's 10:35, sometimes it's 10:28. You never quite know when it is starting. Now, that's - look, I'm not a programmer. I mean, everyone think they're a programmer. I know I'm not. That's a legitimate point of view to take. It had nothing to do with the savings measures arising out of this exercise.

Definitions:
prowess:
great skill at doing sth.

government-wide:
Extending throughout a government.


Thursday, February 19, 2015

in/of the order of sth & punitive

Quotations:
qanda_2015_42

Sharon Talbot: [in the order of; punitive; prowess; a range of 30:31]Thanks, Tony. My question is for Malcolm Turnbull. Malcolm, are the proposed cuts of more than $300 million to the ABC and SBS which will lead to approximately- to an approximate loss of jobs in the order of 500? Is it a punitive measure aimed at prowess of the ABC and SBS in keeping the government accountable on a range of issues?

Definitions:
in/of the order of sth
approximately sth; about sth;

punitive:
1. relating to, done as, or imposed as a punishment;
...

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

go off-script & ring true

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42:

Sarrah Le Marquand: [traffic;senate; air; come across as; parochial; misogyny; resonate; go off-script; ring true;28:28] Well, I think that a lot of our readers feel that they just want a government that is addressing inequality that they feel, they have already been suffering. So, for example, electricity prices is an issue that traffics very heavily among our readers. I mean, politicians of either side, if you are listening, I mean, tackle that and you are going to get a lot of Daily Telegraph readers on side and, contrary to all this external speculation that, you know, there's some sort of political conspiracy is going on at the Daily Telegraph, it's actually just about campaigning for the readers and their concerns and what they want is infrastructure and they want affordable electricity. But in terms of the question and Tony Abbott's speech and the frustrations he's having getting his budget changes through the senate, no, I don't think the G20 was an appropriate forum to be airing his grievances there.  It was - it came across as a very parochial moment and, unfortunately, though, it's been a problem about 20 years since we've had an inspiring speaker. None of our Prime Ministers, going back about 20 years have been very inspirational or passionate or eloquent speakers. I would say probably that's why Julia Gillard's misogyny speech resonated so much, because she just - she went off script and she spoke from the heart and every moment, well, rang true to me and to a lot of, certainly a lot of women around the country, but a lot of men as well. And what was the shame about that moment was that had she sat down and written it to prepare it at an official event, it wouldn't have come out nearly as well. So, when I listened to Tony Abbott on the weekend, I thought: oh, really not good. We can do much better than that as a country, but you know what? We haven't - we haven't done much better than that on that front for a long long time.

Definitions:
go off-script:
The literal meaning is that the actor is ignoring the directions in the script and is making things up. The figurative meaning is anyone who is doing things that are not the traditional way, or are not as directed. Another way to say this would be "making it up as you go along," or "flying by the seat of your pants."

ring true:
to sound true or sincere;

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

misogyny & resonate

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42:

Sarrah Le Marquand: [traffic;senate; air; come across as; parochial; misogyny; resonate; go off-script; ring true;28:28] Well, I think that a lot of our readers feel that they just want a government that is addressing inequality that they feel, they have already been suffering. So, for example, electricity prices is an issue that traffics very heavily among our readers. I mean, politicians of either side, if you are listening, I mean, tackle that and you are going to get a lot of Daily Telegraph readers on side and, contrary to all this external speculation that, you know, there's some sort of political conspiracy is going on at the Daily Telegraph, it's actually just about campaigning for the readers and their concerns and what they want is infrastructure and they want affordable electricity. But in terms of the question and Tony Abbott's speech and the frustrations he's having getting his budget changes through the senate, no, I don't think the G20 was an appropriate forum to be airing his grievances there.  It was - it came across as a very parochial moment and, unfortunately, though, it's been a problem about 20 years since we've had an inspiring speaker. None of our Prime Ministers, going back about 20 years have been very inspirational or passionate or eloquent speakers. I would say probably that's why Julia Gillard's misogyny speech resonated so much, because she just - she went off script and she spoke from the heart and every moment, well, rang true to me and to a lot of, certainly a lot of women around the country, but a lot of men as well. And what was the shame about that moment was that had she sat down and written it to prepare it at an official event, it wouldn't have come out nearly as well. So, when I listened to Tony Abbott on the weekend, I thought: oh, really not good. We can do much better than that as a country, but you know what? We haven't - we haven't done much better than that on that front for a long long time.

Definitions:
misogyny:
the feeling of hating that a man has for women;

resonate:
1. to produce a response in somebody, especially by reminding that person of something or prompting feelings of support or approval.

Monday, February 16, 2015

come across & parochial

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42:

Sarrah Le Marquand: [traffic;senate; air; come across as; parochial; inspirational; misogyny; resonate; go off-script; ring true;28:28] Well, I think that a lot of our readers feel that they just want a government that is addressing inequality that they feel, they have already been suffering. So, for example, electricity prices is an issue that traffics very heavily among our readers. I mean, politicians of either side, if you are listening, I mean, tackle that and you are going to get a lot of Daily Telegraph readers on side and, contrary to all this external speculation that, you know, there's some sort of political conspiracy is going on at the Daily Telegraph, it's actually just about campaigning for the readers and their concerns and what they want is infrastructure and they want affordable electricity. But in terms of the question and Tony Abbott's speech and the frustrations he's having getting his budget changes through the senate, no, I don't think the G20 was an appropriate forum to be airing his grievances there.  It was - it came across as a very parochial moment and, unfortunately, though, it's been a problem about 20 years since we've had an inspiring speaker. None of our Prime Ministers, going back about 20 years have been very inspirational or passionate or eloquent speakers. I would say probably that's why Julia Gillard's misogyny speech resonated so much, because she just - she went off script and she spoke from the heart and every moment, well, rang true to me and to a lot of, certainly a lot of women around the country, but a lot of men as well. And what was the shame about that moment was that had she sat down and written it to prepare it at an official event, it wouldn't have come out nearly as well. So, when I listened to Tony Abbott on the weekend, I thought: oh, really not good. We can do much better than that as a country, but you know what? We haven't - we haven't done much better than that on that front for a long long time.

Definitions:
come across:
1. come across as: to give a particular impression; to appear to have a particular attitude or character;
2. to find something or meet somebody by chance;
...

parochial:
1. only concerned with small issues that happen in your local area and not interested in more important things; narrow-minded, closed-minded;
2. connected with a church parish 

Sunday, February 15, 2015

senate & air

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42:

Sarrah Le Marquand: [traffic;senate; air; come across; parochial; inspirational; misogyny; resonate; go off-script; ring true;28:28] Well, I think that a lot of our readers feel that they just want a government that is addressing inequality that they feel, they have already been suffering. So, for example, electricity prices is an issue that traffics very heavily among our readers. I mean, politicians of either side, if you are listening, I mean, tackle that and you are going to get a lot of Daily Telegraph readers on side and, contrary to all this external speculation that, you know, there's some sort of political conspiracy is going on at the Daily Telegraph, it's actually just about campaigning for the readers and their concerns and what they want is infrastructure and they want affordable electricity. But in terms of the question and Tony Abbott's speech and the frustrations he's having getting his budget changes through the senate, no, I don't think the G20 was an appropriate forum to be airing his grievances there.  It was - it came across as a very parochial moment and, unfortunately, though, it's been a problem about 20 years since we've had an inspiring speaker. None of our Prime Ministers, going back about 20 years have been very inspirational or passionate or eloquent speakers. I would say probably that's why Julia Gillard's misogyny speech resonated so much, because she just - she went off script and she spoke from the heart and every moment, well, rang true to me and to a lot of, certainly a lot of women around the country, but a lot of men as well. And what was the shame about that moment was that had she sat down and written it to prepare it at an official event, it wouldn't have come out nearly as well. So, when I listened to Tony Abbott on the weekend, I thought: oh, really not good. We can do much better than that as a country, but you know what? We haven't - we haven't done much better than that on that front for a long long time.

Definitions:
senate:
one of the two groups of elected politicians who make laws in some countries, for example in the US, Australia, Canada and France. The Senate is smaller than the other group but higher in rank. 

air:
1. to express your opinions publicly;
...

Saturday, February 14, 2015

in a way & traffic

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42:
Tony Jones: [in a way 27:57] I'm just going to ask Sarrah, you're representing in a way the Daily Telegraph. Well, completely. So, what do you suppose your readers make of this particular argument around the budget, around these issues, around the way Tony Abbott presented them.

Sarrah Le Marquand: [traffic;senate; air; come across; parochial; inspirational; misogyny; resonate; go off-script; ring true;28:28] Well, I think that a lot of our readers feel that they just want a government that is addressing inequality that they feel, they have already been suffering. So, for example, electricity prices is an issue that traffics very heavily among our readers. I mean, politicians of either side, if you are listening, I mean, tackle that and you are going to get a lot of Daily Telegraph readers on side and, contrary to all this external speculation that, you know, there's some sort of political conspiracy is going on at the Daily Telegraph, it's actually just about campaigning for the readers and their concerns and what they want is infrastructure and they want affordable electricity. But in terms of the question and Tony Abbott's speech and the frustrations he's having getting his budget changes through the senate, no, I don't think the G20 was an appropriate forum to be airing his grievances there.  It was - it came across as a very parochial moment and, unfortunately, though, it's been a problem about 20 years since we've had an inspiring speaker. None of our Prime Ministers, going back about 20 years have been very inspirational or passionate or eloquent speakers. I would say probably that's why Julia Gillard's misogyny speech resonated so much, because she just - she went off script and she spoke from the heart and every moment, well, rang true to me and to a lot of, certainly a lot of women around the country, but a lot of men as well. And what was the shame about that moment was that had she sat down and written it to prepare it at an official event, it wouldn't have come out nearly as well. So, when I listened to Tony Abbott on the weekend, I thought: oh, really not good. We can do much better than that as a country, but you know what? We haven't - we haven't done much better than that on that front for a long long time.

Definitions:
in a way:
from a certain point of view;

traffic(?):
1.   social or verbal interchange, especially information;
...

Friday, February 13, 2015

skew & Gini Coefficient

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42
Malcolm Turnbull: [means-tested; skew; 25:05] Well, can I just make one observation. I mean, there is - Australia, in terms of income inequality, is much much - income - household incomes, is much less unequal than a lot of other countries in the G20 including the United States and Britain, and one of the reasons is because we have always had a social welfare system which is very heavily means-tested. And your colleague Andrew Lee, when he was a professor at the ANU has written a lot about this and very well too, I might say, about the way in which - and this has been a bipartisan project. There's no, you know, both sides of politics have handled this, and that is one of the reasons, I agree with you, we do need equality or inequality is a real problem, and that's one of the reasons you've got to make sure that in so far as you can you have a strong economy that gives everyone the chance of a job, you have a strong education system, so that people, as jobs require more skills, are able to do them, and you've got to have a social welfare system that is very much skewed to meet their need.

Tanya Plibersek:[Gini Coefficient; 27"02] And can I just add to this. We've actually the measure, the classic measure of inequality is called Gini Coefficient, and that's been - the difference between the richest and poorest has been growing in Australia for several decades with the notable exception over the Rudd Gillard years where the gap closed, and when you say that we are fairly equal country, we are. It's worth remembering that the 3 richest Australians own the same amount wealth of the million poorest Australians, and the great project that you're talking about of generations of Australians investing in our shared prosperity. That's true. We've always been known as a social laboratory, but Medicare is one of the best and most precious aspects of that, an affordable university education - one of the best and most precious aspects of that, and Gonski education funding reforms, the national disability insurance scheme, they were the next stage of that great project.

Definitions: 

skew:
1. to make something uneven, sloping, or unsymmetrical, or be in this state;
2. to misrepresent the true meaning or nature of something;

skewed:
directed towards a particular group, place, etc. in a way that may not be accurate or fair;

Gini Coefficient/index/ratio:
an index of income distribution in an economy, expressed as a fraction, that indicates the level of inequality between incomes. The higher the fraction, the greater the inequality of incomes.

coefficient:
1. a number that measures a particular property (= characteristic) of a substance;
2. a number which is placed before another quantity and which multiplies it, for example 3 in the quantity 3x

Thursday, February 12, 2015

inequality & means-tested

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42
Tanya Plibersek: [terrific; presidency; showcase; decision-making body; inclusive; Ebola; humanitarian; communique;; inequality; 23:10] Well, I think the first thing to say is it's terrific that Australia hosted the G20. It's great that we had the presidency. I think it showcased Australian organisation, you know, it would have looked great to the world. The reason that Labor supported the G20 becoming the premier economic decision-making body during the global financial crisis, is because some problems are too big for anyone country. But I think it was a little bit of a missed opportunity. And growth is good, but growth has to inclusive and has to be environmentally sustainable. And, at this G20, Tony Abbott didn't want to talk about climate change. He did not want to talk about inclusive growth and didn't want to talk about other global issues like Ebola, which, of course, is both a humanitarian and an economic problem, and, thankfully, all of those three things are in the communique, but Australia did not lead the world in putting those issues on the agenda, we got dragged along, very unwillingly, on a number of them. Can I just make this comment about inclusive growth, you now have the OECD, the IMF, the World Bank, the Governor of the Reserve Bank of England, Mark Carney, Christine Lagarde,  all these people saying that for growth to be really sustainable, long term, higher rates, it has to be inclusive, that means investing in people. It means a smaller gap between the richest and poorest in a country. It means investing in health and education and infrastructure. And there is terrific data from the OECD that shows that the larger the difference between the richest and the poorest, the less likely it is that a country's growth will be strong. It's actually better for growth to have less inequality  in quality in a country. Why aren't are we talking about that? Why did the government not want the word inclusive in front of the growth in the communique from the weekend?

Malcolm Turnbull: [means-tested; skew; 25:05] Well, can I just make one observation. I mean, there is - Australia, in terms of income inequality, is much much - income - household incomes, is much less unequal than a lot of other countries in the G20 including the United States and Britain, and one of the reasons is because we have always had a social welfare system which is very heavily means-tested. And your colleague Andrew Lee, when he was a professor at the ANU has written a lot about this and very well too, I might say, about the way in which - and this has been a bipartisan project. There's no, you know, both sides of politics have handled this, and that is one of the reasons, I agree with you, we do need equality or inequality is a real problem, and that's one of the reasons you've got to make sure that in so far as you can you have a strong economy that gives everyone the chance of a job, you have a strong education system, so that people, as jobs require more skills, are able to do them, and you've got to have a social welfare system that is very much skewed to meet their need.

Definitions: 

inequality:
the unfair difference between groups of people in society, when some have more wealth, status or opportunities than others;

means-tested:
an amount of money or a benefit that is means-tested changes according to your income. If your income is low you get more money, and if it is high you get less money.

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

humanitarian & communique

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42
Tanya Plibersek: [terrific; presidency; showcase; decision-making body; inclusive; Ebola; humanitarian; communique;; inequality; 23:10] Well, I think the first thing to say is it's terrific that Australia hosted the G20. It's great that we had the presidency. I think it showcased Australian organisation, you know, it would have looked great to the world. The reason that Labor supported the G20 becoming the premier economic decision-making body during the global financial crisis, is because some problems are too big for anyone country. But I think it was a little bit of a missed opportunity. And growth is good, but growth has to inclusive and has to be environmentally sustainable. And, at this G20, Tony Abbott didn't want to talk about climate change. He did not want to talk about inclusive growth and didn't want to talk about other global issues like Ebola, which, of course, is both a humanitarian and an economic problem, and, thankfully, all of those three things are in the communique, but Australia did not lead the world in putting those issues on the agenda, we got dragged along, very unwillingly, on a number of them. Can I just make this comment about inclusive growth, you now have the OECD, the IMF, the World Bank, the Governor of the Reserve Bank of England, Mark Carney, Christine Lagarde,  all these people saying that for growth to be really sustainable, long term, higher rates, it has to be inclusive, that means investing in people. It means a smaller gap between the richest and poorest in a country. It means investing in health and education and infrastructure. And there is terrific data from the OECD that shows that the larger the difference between the richest and the poorest, the less likely it is that a country's growth will be strong. It's actually better for growth to have less inequality  in quality in a country. Why aren't are we talking about that? Why did the government not want the word inclusive in front of the growth in the communique from the weekend?

Definitions: 
humanitarian:
concerned with reducing suffering and improving the conditions that people live in;

communique:
an official announcement or statement, especially one made to the media;

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

inclusive & Ebola

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42
Tanya Plibersek: [terrific; presidency; showcase; decision-making body; inclusive; Ebola; humanitarian; communique; dragged; inequality; 23:10] Well, I think the first thing to say is it's terrific that Australia hosted the G20. It's great that we had the presidency. I think it showcased Australian organisation, you know, it would have looked great to the world. The reason that Labor supported the G20 becoming the premier economic decision-making body during the global financial crisis, is because some problems are too big for anyone country. But I think it was a little bit of a missed opportunity. And growth is good, but growth has to inclusive and has to be environmentally sustainable. And, at this G20, Tony Abbott didn't want to talk about climate change. He did not want to talk about inclusive growth and didn't want to talk about other global issues like Ebola, which, of course, is both a humanitarian and an economic problem, and, thankfully, all of those three things are in the communique, but Australia did not lead the world in putting those issues on the agenda, we got dragged along, very unwillingly, on a number of them. Can I just make this comment about inclusive growth, you now have the OECD, the IMF, the World Bank, the Governor of the Reserve Bank of England, Mark Carney, Christine Lagarde,  all these people saying that for growth to be really sustainable, long term, higher rates, it has to be inclusive, that means investing in people. It means a smaller gap between the richest and poorest in a country. It means investing in health and education and infrastructure. And there is terrific data from the OECD that shows that the larger the difference between the richest and the poorest, the less likely it is that a country's growth will be strong. It's actually better for growth to have less inequality  in quality in a country. Why aren't are we talking about that? Why did the government not want the word inclusive in front of the growth in the communique from the weekend?

Definitions:

inclusive:
having the total cost, or the cost of sth that is mentioned, contained in the price;

Ebola:
a virus transmitted by blood and body fluids that causes the linings of bodily organs and vessels to leak blood and fluids, usually resulting in death

Monday, February 9, 2015

showcase & decision-making body

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42
Tanya Plibersek: [terrific; presidency; showcase; decision-making body; inclusive; Ebola; humanitarian; communique; dragged; inequality; 23:10] Well, I think the first thing to say is it's terrific that Australia hosted the G20. It's great that we had the presidency. I think it showcased Australian organisation, you know, it would have looked great to the world. The reason that Labor supported the G20 becoming the premier economic decision-making body during the global financial crisis, is because some problems are too big for anyone country. But I think it was a little bit of a missed opportunity. And growth is good, but growth has to inclusive and has to be environmentally sustainable. And, at this G20, Tony Abbott didn't want to talk about climate change. He did not want to talk about inclusive growth and didn't want to talk about other global issues like Ebola, which, of course, is both a humanitarian and an economic problem, and, thankfully, all of those three things are in the communique, but Australia did not lead the world in putting those issues on the agenda, we got dragged along, very unwillingly, on a number of them. Can I just make this comment about inclusive growth, you now have the OECD, the IMF, the World Bank, the Governor of the Reserve Bank of England, Mark Carney, Christine Lagarde,  all these people saying that for growth to be really sustainable, long term, higher rates, it has to be inclusive, that means investing in people. It means a smaller gap between the richest and poorest in a country. It means investing in health and education and infrastructure. And there is terrific data from the OECD that shows that the larger the difference between the richest and the poorest, the less likely it is that a country's growth will be strong. It's actually better for growth to have less inequality  in quality in a country. Why aren't are we talking about that? Why did the government not want the word inclusive in front of the growth in the communique from the weekend?

Definitions:

showcase:
to show someone or something in a way that attracts attention and emphasizes their good qualities;

decision-making:
the process of deciding what to do about something, especially in an organization;

body:
an organized group of people such as lawmakers, students, or soldiers;



Sunday, February 8, 2015

terrific & presidency

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42
Tanya Plibersek: [terrific; presidency; showcase; decision-making body; inclusive; Ebola; humanitarian; communique; dragged; inequality; 23:10] Well, I think the first thing to say is it's terrific that Australia hosted the G20. It's great that we had the presidency. I think it showcased Australian organisation, you know, it would have looked great to the world. The reason that Labor supported the G20 becoming the premier economic decision-making body during the global financial crisis, is because some problems are too big for anyone country. But I think it was a little bit of a missed opportunity. And growth is good, but growth has to inclusive and has to be environmentally sustainable. And, at this G20, Tony Abbott didn't want to talk about climate change. He did not want to talk about inclusive growth and didn't want to talk about other global issues like Ebola, which, of course, is both a humanitarian and an economic problem, and, thankfully, all of those three things are in the communique, but Australia did not lead the world in putting those issues on the agenda, we got dragged along, very unwillingly, on a number of them. Can I just make this comment about inclusive growth, you now have the OECD, the IMF, the World Bank, the Governor of the Reserve Bank of England, Mark Carney, Christine Lagarde,  all these people saying that for growth to be really sustainable, long term, higher rates, it has to be inclusive, that means investing in people. It means a smaller gap between the richest and poorest in a country. It means investing in health and education and infrastructure. And there is terrific data from the OECD that shows that the larger the difference between the richest and the poorest, the less likely it is that a country's growth will be strong. It's actually better for growth to have less inequality  in quality in a country. Why aren't are we talking about that? Why did the government not want the word inclusive in front of the growth in the communique from the weekend?

Definitions:
terrific:
excellent; wonderful;

presidency:
the job of being president of a country or an organization;

Saturday, February 7, 2015

secure & groundbreaking

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42
Tony Jones: [secure; groundbreaking; 23:01] As Malcolm Turnbull points out, Tony Abbott did secure a groundbreaking deal on global growth. I mean, isn't it best to judge him on that when it comes to the G20?

Definitions:
secure:
1. to obtain or achieve sth, especially when this mean using a lot of effort;

groundbreaking:
making new discoveries; using new method.

Friday, February 6, 2015

nitty-gritty & intergalactic

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42
Malcolm Turnbull: [wafty; collectively; implement; nitty-gritty; worthwhile; 20:40] Look, the. It's not something - It's not something -  It's not something I've turned my mind to, needless to say. But I just say this again in defence of Tony: the - all politics is local. Right? And the purpose of that leaders' retreat, I think, they called it and they were all just going to sit together and talk frankly, was to talk about the challenges each of them faced in their own countries which, of course, collectively, our overcoming those challenges and implementing their policies is what adds up to that over 2% increasing growth right? increase in GDP, and that is the - that - you know, so all of those things, I know they may seem - they may not seem as high and wafty and grand and 80,000 feet as some other philosophical themes, but that is the nitty-gritty of politics and the nitty-gritty of a government. And that's what Tony Abbott was talking about. And I think the other leaders would have appreciated getting an insight into the particular challenges in Australia, and no doubt shared similar challenges with him. You've got to remember that, you know, why we're all very familiar with Barack Obama's domestic challenges, you know, he's probably not very familiar with what we're facing here. So, I think it's worthwhile for the Australian host to actually set out and say, okay, this what we are dealing with here and you will find - you would have found that a lot of those countries had very similar challenges. One of the things we do not do well enough in Australia in government - Tanya may agree with this, I think - is that we don't pay enough attention to comparable - sorry, to comparable comment, comparable policy responses to common problems. You know every country is dealing with the same issues, you know, whether it is ageing or whether it is, you know, youth unemployment, or whether it is climate change, and we don't pay enough attention to what each of us is doing, because there is a lot to learn. So I think what Tony was doing was really setting out the local scene to inform the others and encourage them to do the same for his benefit. 

Malcolm Turnbull: [intergalactic 22:54] Well, that's sort of ... That's an intergalactic issue as opposed to ... 

Definitions:
nitty-gritty:
the basic or most important details of an issue or a situation.

intergalactic:
existing or happening between galaxies of stars.


Thursday, February 5, 2015

collectively & implement

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42
Malcolm Turnbull: [wafty; collectively; implement; nitty-gritty; worthwhile; 20:40] Look, the. It's not something - It's not something -  It's not something I've turned my mind to, needless to say. But I just say this again in defence of Tony: the - all politics is local. Right? And the purpose of that leaders' retreat, I think, they called it and they were all just going to sit together and talk frankly, was to talk about the challenges each of them faced in their own countries which, of course, collectively, our overcoming those challenges and implementing their policies is what adds up to that over 2% increasing growth right? increase in GDP, and that is the - that - you know, so all of those things, I know they may seem - they may not seem as high and wafty and grand and 80,000 feet as some other philosophical themes, but that is the nitty-gritty of politics and the nitty-gritty of a government. And that's what Tony Abbott was talking about. And I think the other leaders would have appreciated getting an insight into the particular challenges in Australia, and no doubt shared similar challenges with him. You've got to remember that, you know, why we're all very familiar with Barack Obama's domestic challenges, you know, he's probably not very familiar with what we're facing here. So, I think it's worthwhile for the Australian host to actually set out and say, okay, this what we are dealing with here and you will find - you would have found that a lot of those countries had very similar challenges. One of the things we do not do well enough in Australia in government - Tanya may agree with this, I think - is that we don't pay enough attention to comparable - sorry, to comparable comment, comparable policy responses to common problems. You know every country is dealing with the same issues, you know, whether it is ageing or whether it is, you know, youth unemployment, or whether it is climate change, and we don't pay enough attention to what each of us is doing, because there is a lot to learn. So I think what Tony was doing was really setting out the local scene to inform the others and encourage them to do the same for his benefit. 

Definitions:
collectively:
together, as a group.

implement:
to make sth that has been officially decided start to happen or be used;

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

co-payment & wafty

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42
Ryan Broom: [opening; co-payment; 20:22]Thanks, Tony. My question is to Malcolm Turnbull: Malcolm, if you were Prime Minister and were preparing your address for the opening leaders' summit for the G20. Would you have mentioned domestic issues like the seven dollar GP co-payment or abolishing the carbon tax?

Malcolm Turnbull: [wafty; collectively; implement; nitty-gritty; worthwhile; 20:40] Look, the. It's not something - It's not something -  It's not something I've turned my mind to, needless to say. But I just say this again in defence of Tony: the - all politics is local. Right? And the purpose of that leaders' retreat, I think, they called it and they were all just going to sit together and talk frankly, was to talk about the challenges each of them faced in their own countries which, of course, collectively, our overcoming those challenges and implementing their policies is what adds up to that over 2% increasing growth right? increase in GDP, and that is the - that - you know, so all of those things, I know they may seem - they may not seem as high and wafty and grand and 80,000 feet as some other philosophical themes, but that is the nitty-gritty of politics and the nitty-gritty of a government. And that's what Tony Abbott was talking about. And I think the other leaders would have appreciated getting an insight into the particular challenges in Australia, and no doubt shared similar challenges with him. You've got to remember that, you know, why we're all very familiar with Barack Obama's domestic challenges, you know, he's probably not very familiar with what we're facing here. So, I think it's worthwhile for the Australian host to actually set out and say, okay, this what we are dealing with here and you will find - you would have found that a lot of those countries had very similar challenges. One of the things we do not do well enough in Australia in government - Tanya may agree with this, I think - is that we don't pay enough attention to comparable - sorry, to comparable comment, comparable policy responses to common problems. You know every country is dealing with the same issues, you know, whether it is ageing or whether it is, you know, youth unemployment, or whether it is climate change, and we don't pay enough attention to what each of us is doing, because there is a lot to learn. So I think what Tony was doing was really setting out the local scene to inform the others and encourage them to do the same for his benefit. 

Definitions:
co-payment:
an arrangement by which two or more parties make complementary payments on a loan or other financial obligation, or a payment made in this way, especially a patient's payment for a medical expense partially covered by insurance;

wafty:
Tending to waft; gaseous, insubstantial.


Tuesday, February 3, 2015

simulcast & opening

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42
Tony Jones:[simulcast 20:12] All right. Q and A is live across Australia. It's simulcast on ABC news 24 news radio and Australia Plus. Our next question tonight comes from Ryan Broom.

Ryan Broom: [opening; co-payment; 20:22]Thanks, Tony. My question is to Malcolm Turnbull: Malcolm, if you were Prime Minister and were preparing your address for the opening leaders' summit for the G20. Would you have mentioned domestic issues like the seven dollar GP co-payment or abolishing the carbon tax?

Definitions:
simulcast:
to broadcast sth on radio and television at the same time or on both AM and FM radio;

opening:
1. a ceremony to celebrate the start of a public event or the first time a new building, road, etc. is used;
...

Monday, February 2, 2015

remotely & Rhodes Scholar

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42

Ben Elton: [remotely; Rhodes Scholar;] No,  not, not remotely. It certainly doesn't amuse me, Malcolm. He has created his own caricature. I'm trying to want to understand how a Rhodes Scholar can deny climate science.

Definitions:
remotely:
1. to a very slightly degree;
2. far away from places where other people live;

Rhodes Scholar:
a student from the US, Germany or the Commonwealth who is given a scholarship to study in Britain at Oxford University from a fund that was started by Cecil Rhodes in 1902;

Sunday, February 1, 2015

bear in mind & caricature

Quotations:
qanda_2014_ep42

Tony Jones: [bear in mind; 18:22]Can you - can you respond briefly to that, and can we just bear in mind that the Canadian Prime Minister  has signed up to that green bank.

Malcolm: [caricature 19:00] So, there is a lot. But there is a lot of capital committed. I just want to say this though, in defence of Tony Abbott, just be careful that you don't make the mistake of creating a caricature character and assume which which may amusing you, and assuming that is real person, Ben, Ben...

Definitions:
bear in mind:
to hold in one's mind; remember;

caricature:
1. a description of a person or thing that makes them seem ridiculous by exaggerating some of their characteristics;
..